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numerate but need to get to A level maths standard in 5 months?? watch

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    Hi,

    I have recently applied to uni for an engineering course (yacht production) they have told me that my maths experience is not sufficient.
    not surprising as i am numerate but got a D in GCSE and am now 32...

    I need to get somewhere near A level standard by september to gain entry to the course (uni have told me this is possible)

    I intend to self study (on a full time basis) with lots of contact time with a tutor initially to get me going.

    As it has been a long time since i was involved in the world of education and although tutors are lovely people, they are still in business...

    I am after any advice on the best ways of self study? (of course i am aware this is quite a personal preference and a tutor will try and point me in a certain direction)

    the distance learning courses, i have been warned off due to the fees and the fact that apparently with good text books i dont need them.

    Should i be buying the edexcel books for example? as most of the stuff i need is applied rather than pure math...of course i am going to need some pure to move into the applied??

    so many questions. I hope i am posting in the right area.
    Any info/suggestions/advice anyone can offer would be appreciated.

    At present, i am numerate, have run my own businesses etc, but am at very basic algebra, trig, geo etc,

    I am a little lost and have a great deal to risk in leaving my job to do this full time so am trying to gather as much inffo as possible before leaping...

    Thanks
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    (Original post by huntjody)
    Hi,

    I have recently applied to uni for an engineering course (yacht production) they have told me that my maths experience is not sufficient.
    not surprising as i am numerate but got a D in GCSE and am now 32...

    I need to get somewhere near A level standard by september to gain entry to the course (uni have told me this is possible)

    I intend to self study (on a full time basis) with lots of contact time with a tutor initially to get me going.

    As it has been a long time since i was involved in the world of education and although tutors are lovely people, they are still in business...

    I am after any advice on the best ways of self study? (of course i am aware this is quite a personal preference and a tutor will try and point me in a certain direction)

    the distance learning courses, i have been warned off due to the fees and the fact that apparently with good text books i dont need them.

    Should i be buying the edexcel books for example? as most of the stuff i need is applied rather than pure math...of course i am going to need some pure to move into the applied??

    so many questions. I hope i am posting in the right area.
    Any info/suggestions/advice anyone can offer would be appreciated.

    At present, i am numerate, have run my own businesses etc, but am at very basic algebra, trig, geo etc,

    I am a little lost and have a great deal to risk in leaving my job to do this full time so am trying to gather as much inffo as possible before leaping...

    Thanks
    By applied, I assume since it's Engineering based, we're talking Mechanics (since it's Normal A Level standard, M1 + M2).

    To do M1 and M2, you need to be capable of doing a lot of content from C1-C3. Mostly the large trigonometry and differentiation sections from C3 and Integration at a C2 level (although, to be honest, a lot of the time C4 level integration familiarity can be required), but in order to do those you need to do all 3, as it's dependent on one another. I'd say you can safely skip stuff like graphs and circle theorems, Binomial etc, but you will DEFINITELY need:

    C1: Integration, Differentiation, Algebra + Functions (in order to understand what exactly you're doing with those operations).
    C2: Exponentials and Logs, Trigonometry, Differentiation and Integration, Algebra and Functions (doesn't hurt, having a thorough understanding of algebraic techniques is essential).
    C3: Algebra and Functions, Trigonometry, Exponentials and Logs, Differentiation.
    C4 [Optional, but highly recommended]: Differentiation, Integration(there are some disguised differential equations in M2 which are easily solved with techniques learnt here), Vectors.

    I would personally recommend just doing it all. Doing specific chapters is not going to be a huge time saver, and it would be better to just not have any gaps in your knowledge. I would say, if you're doing it full time, it should be possible to do C1-C4 in about 2-3 months, and M1 and M2 should take 2-3 weeks each. I would definitely completely the core modules first.

    The best possible resource for self teaching is the books. The Heinmann books are very thorough and very easy to understand. Just go on Amazon and type in C1, C2 etc, and buy the ones that look like this http://www.amazon.co.uk/Edexcel-AS-L...1581379&sr=8-1

    Best of luck.
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    Make sure you've got a good grip of all of the GCSE higher maths syllabus first. Have a look at a couple of GCSE past papers if you haven't taken any formal exams lately.

    As TwilightKnight pointed out, a solid understanding of pure maths will be very helpful for you even though it's the mechanics you're mainly interested in. You could do M1 with knowledge from C1 and C2 (I'm speaking from experience from OCR but most other boards are likely to be similar) and M2 with C3 and C4.

    I wouldn't recommend skipping any pure maths out; you never know when it will be useful and it certainly can't hurt to have a complete grounding in pure maths as well as mechanics.

    As long as you use the textbooks, work hard and do plenty of past papers, you should be fine.
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    (Original post by huntjody)
    Hi,

    I am a little lost and have a great deal to risk in leaving my job to do this full time so am trying to gather as much info as possible before leaping...

    Thanks
    I hope you don't mind me being blunt but if you attained grade D at GCSE half a lifetime ago you will struggle to get yourself to A Level standard in five months (how will this be assessed anyway as the A Level exams are in May/June?). I would advise you not to give up your job.
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    A Level is normally a two year course and most schools would not permit anyone with a GCSE grade D to even start the course. I would think it would take 2 months for an adult to get up to a GCSE standard A or B. Six modules are required for an A Level and I think in your circumstances you would be unlikely to finish two.

    I think the University is being dishonest in saying it is possible for a person that got a D in GCSE several years ago to reach A level standard in 5 months.
 
 
 
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