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Charity stores will no longer be able to play music-help them fight back. watch

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    Charities and other non-profit organisations will soon no longer be able to play any music at all.
    Currently the law prohibits us playing anything apart from that that is in the public realm (that means the composer has to have died 60 years ago).

    A short account of my own (limited) experience:
    Spoiler:
    Show

    You can imagine how frustrating it is to be in a store that plays the same classical music over and over again. My manager feels like she's going insane, we honestly don't know what's worse, silence, or the same music that we don't like over and over again.

    It makes the volunteering experience feel terrible, it's become boring, monotonous, everyone seems less happy. The atmosphere and vibe of the shop is less friendly, and it's a lot harder to be cheerful around customers.

    More-over my manager is in there usually at least 5 days a week. She gets paid pittance, and now has far less job satisfaction, it just seems stupid to put charities in this position.


    Soon more licensing laws will come into play requiring a licence to play any music at all (bar having a live band in the shop, which is of course impossible in the vast vast vast amount of cases).



    LINKAGE:
    http://www.ncvo-vol.org.uk/dontstopthemusic

    What suggestions do people have for making the campaign more public?


    Complications with buying a licence:
    Spoiler:
    Show

    It's not as easy to buy a license as one might think.
    Here is the situation where I work:

    BIG BOSS:
    Senior managment positions:
    1
    2
    3
    4
    5
    My managers boss
    My manager
    Relief managers
    Me.

    You can see in the hierarchy, it's damned impossible for my manager, or even my managers boss to actually get into a position of debate (as I can't spell the word I want to use) with the 'big boss'.
    Moreover, for our charity, it has to be in the charities name, if my manager was allowed to pay for it, she would. There are numerous arguments against my manager being allowed to do this, some bad (other managers might feel a bit pressured) and better arguments:
    Spoiler:
    Show

    "We cannot allow individuals to pay for this as it has to be in the name of the charity otherwise it may be significantly higher. under charitable law we are not allowed to raise funds specifically for this as all funds that we do raise need to benefit the main objectives of the charity to care for those who are suffering from a life limiting illness; on top of this some shops would not be able to contribute to the cost of the licence and it would therefore be unfair to ask them to do so."

    To pay for the PRS licence it would cost £2823 for all of the shops. To pay for the PPL licence it would cost around £3720 for all of the shops.

    So the approximate total costs would be £6543.

    How charities and other non-profit organisations are supposed to raise funds for this is unclear.
    As stated before we cannot raise funds specifically for this ,and it is hard to justify spending such funds. Someone might theoretically be able to donate that money on the condition that it is spent on such licences. However I don't know how legal that would be. Moreover, we'd need someone with 6.5K (maybe more) to give such a donation. And that would of course only be for our charity (alternatively however, if anyone does have around that much money to donate that would of course solve at least our charities problem ).

    Thanks for your time, Tom.
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    (Original post by there's too much love)
    Currently the law prohibits us playing anything that is in the public realm (that means the composer has to have died 60 years ago).

    A short account of my own (limited) experience:
    Spoiler:
    Show

    You can imagine how frustrating it is to be in a store that plays the same classical music over and over again. My manager feels like she's going insane, we honestly don't know what's worse, silence, or the same music that we don't like over and over again.

    It makes the volunteering experience feel terrible, it's become boring, monotonous, everyone seems less happy. The atmosphere and vibe of the shop is less friendly, and it's a lot harder to be cheerful around customers.

    More-over my manager is in there usually at least 5 days a week. She gets paid pittance, and now has far less job satisfaction, it just seems stupid to put charities in this position.
    I'm a bit confused as to whether you can or can't currently play music in the public domain - your statement says you can't, but then your experience implies you do. :confused:

    Has the charity organisation considered having low-key but good bands record music for the charity? Surely you'd be able to play that because then you own the music (to an extent) and could also raise funds by selling the music.
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    They can't spend money on that. Also there are a diverse range of musical tastes, what some consider good other consider terrible.

    At the moment we can play music in the public domain, but this will very shortly be a thing of the past.

    I'll edit that part of my post, long day, I meant to put:
    "Currently the law prohibits us playing anything apart from that that is in the public realm (that means the composer has to have died 60 years ago). "
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    (Original post by there's too much love)
    They can't spend money on that. Also there are a diverse range of musical tastes, what some consider good other consider terrible.

    At the moment we can play music in the public domain, but this will very shortly be a thing of the past.

    I'll edit that part of my post, long day, I meant to put:
    "Currently the law prohibits us playing anything apart from that that is in the public realm (that means the composer has to have died 60 years ago). "
    To be honest here, I don't see why this music matters so much. I've worked in places that played music, it just drove me to distraction and I was pleased the day the stereo didn't work.
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    If the composer has to have died 60+ years ago then the obvious solution is to play some kickass blues.
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    What about royalty-free music?
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    Seems a bit strange, if no artists are owed royalties who could object?
 
 
 
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