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    Hi,

    Im 24 years old. When I was 18 I started a degree in Law with French Law at UCL completing the first year successfully. Due to various problems (unrelated to the course) I decided it wasn't for me. I transferred to philosophy which I graduated in last year with a 2.1.

    I have decided a career in law is now for me and am super motivated. However before that I have two years of Teach First coming up, so I am 2 years away from GDL & LPC etc.

    By the time I apply I will have the following:

    2.1. in Philosophy from UCL.
    A Masters in Education and Leadership.
    2 years of Teach First (graduate teaching scheme in tough schools..fairly elite) + Fully Qualified teacher.
    Coach at Tottenham Hotspur's academy.
    Fluent in English an French. Learning Chinese. Basic Italian.
    AABB(A) at A level

    As well as various other generic extracurriculars.

    Question: I will be 26 by the time I start the GDL. Will top law firms be put off by this given a fairly rounded CV?
    Magic Circle realistic ambition?
    What do I need to do to put myself in the best position? I realistically need a TC and funding for both GDL and LPC...

    You guys are super helpful in here and there's a great atmosphere so thanks for any assistance
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    The difficulty will be in persuading firms why you have now decided on law, as opposed to teaching. If you can put forward persuasive arguments on that front then your CV should be of interest.

    Things such as your football coaching (even though it's Spurs) will catch recruiters' attention provided you can explain what transferable skills you've learnt.
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    I would have ignored this, except I saw the words "Tottenham Hotspur", so I'm all in.

    Wrong time of year, but there's an easy litmus test.

    Apply for the Graduate Open Days for a range of the firms you want in on. Most of them use the same procedure, indeed the same form as for their TCs, and are looking to select only a handful of attendees, which they won't waste on no-hopers. If you get on the Open Day, I'd think you have a dog's chance or better for the TC and then you can quiz the recruiting teams about it. If none of them want to even invite you to the Open Day, that might tell you something.

    I got rej.doc from Simmons and Simmons a few days before they were supposed to give out the decisions - so I read from that that I must have been struck off in the pre-preliminary "CV on pink paper" cull.

    Alternatively, there is a career changers' day hosted at CoL coming up in about three weeks (it was engineered by L2B magazine, I think) you might get some sense from the assembled guests, which I believe includes HR bods from big city mobs. I can't imagine they have too much interest in sugar coating anything for you -just more TC applications for them to plough through, if they give a false impression.
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    In terms of age, I will be 27 when I will (hopefully) start my TC and I have vac schemes secured at MC and SC firms, so this hasn't put firms off.
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    (Original post by chalks)
    The difficulty will be in persuading firms why you have now decided on law, as opposed to teaching. If you can put forward persuasive arguments on that front then your CV should be of interest.

    Things such as your football coaching (even though it's Spurs) will catch recruiters' attention provided you can explain what transferable skills you've learnt.
    I should have no problems there. My initial route was to become a football coach - with teaching a way to earn better money whilst I built my career from scratch and a way of picking up obvious transferable skills - but now I want to work in an environment which stretches me more intellectually. I often work with people who have no GCSEs and need to be stimulated intellectually in my work.

    Leadership, discipline, planning, attention to detail, ability to spot and rectify problems quickly, making key decisions under pressure.. it's all there.

    Thanks for the response. Even if you are a gooner!(?)
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    (Original post by Clip)
    I would have ignored this, except I saw the words "Tottenham Hotspur", so I'm all in.

    Wrong time of year, but there's an easy litmus test.

    Apply for the Graduate Open Days for a range of the firms you want in on. Most of them use the same procedure, indeed the same form as for their TCs, and are looking to select only a handful of attendees, which they won't waste on no-hopers. If you get on the Open Day, I'd think you have a dog's chance or better for the TC and then you can quiz the recruiting teams about it. If none of them want to even invite you to the Open Day, that might tell you something.

    I got rej.doc from Simmons and Simmons a few days before they were supposed to give out the decisions - so I read from that that I must have been struck off in the pre-preliminary "CV on pink paper" cull.

    Alternatively, there is a career changers' day hosted at CoL coming up in about three weeks (it was engineered by L2B magazine, I think) you might get some sense from the assembled guests, which I believe includes HR bods from big city mobs. I can't imagine they have too much interest in sugar coating anything for you -just more TC applications for them to plough through, if they give a false impression.
    Thanks so much. The College of Law has some great information. I'll also look into the Open Days.

    Vac Schemes: How often do firms tend to offer vac schemes? I've noticed in some other threads that some offer Easter as well as Summer placements. Is it the norm for firms to offer several opportunities for placement throughout the year?
    I am in the same equivalent position as a non-law student nearing the end of his first year. Should I be applying for vac schemes for next sumer (2012)?
    Do firms sponsor the GDL as well as LPC?


    I will be doing extensive research myself but TSR is a good place to get a fair sweep.
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    I'm currently a trainee and many fellow trainees are 26/27 and a handful are older, that's not a problem.

    Magic Circle is perhaps viable, but looking at your CV as outlined here I'd say you are borderline so, like most people, should work on your CV as much as possible and prepare thoroughly for interviews. You should do something to demonstrate commitment to law: you've already given up on studying law, so as a recruiter I would have doubts about how commited you are. You say that you transferred due to problems "unrelated to the course": without wishing to cause offence, if I was a recruiter I would find this difficult to believe without further explanation.

    I guess what I'm trying to say is that there is no reason you can't get a Training Contract with Magic Circle firms: your grades are sufficient but not outstanding, so you will have to do a fair amount of legwork first. You'll need to research thoroughly, apply for some vacation schemes and prepare very thoroughly for interviews.
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    (Original post by Phonicsdude)
    Hi,

    Im 24 years old. When I was 18 I started a degree in Law with French Law at UCL completing the first year successfully. Due to various problems (unrelated to the course) I decided it wasn't for me. I transferred to philosophy which I graduated in last year with a 2.1.

    I have decided a career in law is now for me and am super motivated. However before that I have two years of Teach First coming up, so I am 2 years away from GDL & LPC etc.

    By the time I apply I will have the following:

    2.1. in Philosophy from UCL.
    A Masters in Education and Leadership.
    2 years of Teach First (graduate teaching scheme in tough schools..fairly elite) + Fully Qualified teacher.
    Coach at Tottenham Hotspur's academy.
    Fluent in English an French. Learning Chinese. Basic Italian.
    AABB(A) at A level

    As well as various other generic extracurriculars.

    Question: I will be 26 by the time I start the GDL. Will top law firms be put off by this given a fairly rounded CV?
    Magic Circle realistic ambition?
    What do I need to do to put myself in the best position? I realistically need a TC and funding for both GDL and LPC...

    You guys are super helpful in here and there's a great atmosphere so thanks for any assistance
    If you're sure that law if for you now, why don't you just apply for the GDL and forget about Teach First. IMO two years with teach first is just unnecessarily prolonging the time you will have to wait until you are doing what you really want to do. x

    Regarding funding- you can either apply for a career development loan, or work for a year, (preferrably in a law-related job) and save up, whilst also getting experience that will support your future application. x
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    Is anyone else slightly bemused at what passes for 'super badass' and 'elite' these days?
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    (Original post by Phonicsdude)
    I should have no problems there. My initial route was to become a football coach - with teaching a way to earn better money whilst I built my career from scratch and a way of picking up obvious transferable skills - but now I want to work in an environment which stretches me more intellectually. I often work with people who have no GCSEs and need to be stimulated intellectually in my work.

    Leadership, discipline, planning, attention to detail, ability to spot and rectify problems quickly, making key decisions under pressure.. it's all there.

    Thanks for the response. Even if you are a gooner!(?)
    I'm not sure if I've misunderstood but I think the point was that, given that you have changed direction away from law before and are now doing Teach First it isn't obvious that you are certain that law is your 'vocation'. The points that you raise here are certainly good things to emphasise but they don't go towards convincing the recruiter that you are a philosophy graduate with some teaching experience and a commitment to law rather than, say, a philosophy graduate who has struggled to find a solid job and is just applying for everything. The easiest way to demonstrate this, I suspect, would be to use your holidays to do work experience placements/vacation schemes in law firms.
 
 
 
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