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Child ticket for a train to london watch

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    i have a job interview in london soon.. i will be travelling from crewe to london euston, and will be booking the tickets soon.

    i would like to get a child ticket as they are around half the price, but could i get away with a child ticket (im 17 but look about 13)? or are they really strict with this sort of thing?

    thanks for any help
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    (Original post by MutantGecko)
    i have a job interview in london soon.. i will be travelling from crewe to london euston, and will be booking the tickets soon.

    i would like to get a child ticket as they are around half the price, but could i get away with a child ticket (im 17 but look about 13)? or are they really strict with this sort of thing?

    thanks for any help
    It might different in other parts of the country but in Sheffield if you want to buy a child ticket you always have to show a pass to prove that you're under 16 (unless of course it's a child under 10)
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    Wouldn't risk it - I was once kicked off a train for "not having a valid ticket" because I couldn't produce ID. I bought a child ticket at 15 but the ticketman was having none of it.
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    (Original post by MutantGecko)
    i have a job interview in london soon.. i will be travelling from crewe to london euston, and will be booking the tickets soon.

    i would like to get a child ticket as they are around half the price, but could i get away with a child ticket (im 17 but look about 13)? or are they really strict with this sort of thing?

    thanks for any help
    Crewe to Euston? That'll be Virgin trains. You might be OK, but Virgin's ticket grippers can be notoriously strict about any sort of irregularities.

    Fares are cheaper on a London Midland Only ticket anyway.
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    thanks for the help guys, think ill just get an adult ticket
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    greyhound it
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    How many 15 year olds have ID that proves they are 15? Go for the childs ticket
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    (Original post by MutantGecko)
    i have a job interview in london soon.. i will be travelling from crewe to london euston, and will be booking the tickets soon.

    i would like to get a child ticket as they are around half the price, but could i get away with a child ticket (im 17 but look about 13)? or are they really strict with this sort of thing?
    Erm, I'm guessing that if you're going for a job interview, you'll be in business dress? There's also the fact you'll be travelling in the middle of the day on a weekday?
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    (Original post by MutantGecko)
    i have a job interview in london soon.. i will be travelling from crewe to london euston, and will be booking the tickets soon.

    i would like to get a child ticket as they are around half the price, but could i get away with a child ticket (im 17 but look about 13)? or are they really strict with this sort of thing?

    thanks for any help
    Ask the company to pay for interview travel expenses?
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    Personally I wouldn't risk it.

    (Original post by Baula)
    It might different in other parts of the country but in Sheffield if you want to buy a child ticket you always have to show a pass to prove that you're under 16 (unless of course it's a child under 10)
    How would you do that? At least when I was under 16, we didn't have any kind of ID to prove it.
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    Buy a child ticket and go to sleep with a cap or hoody on ...
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    Going to sleep is a very good idea. I'm a sneaky git, and have traveled on trains without paying quite a few times. The best method is to pretend you're asleep, hands down

    Since you are paying for a ticket though, unless you get a real a-hole of a conductor you'll have no problems. As others have said, who has ID when they're under 16? First time most people have ID is when they get their provisional I would've thought.
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    (Original post by WelshBluebird)
    Personally I wouldn't risk it.



    How would you do that? At least when I was under 16, we didn't have any kind of ID to prove it.
    Oh, when you turn 11 here you're supposed to go to the travel centre and get a free children's travel pass. Without this, you get charged full fare on all transport - even if you look under 16! Though, there are some nice drivers that let you on if you've clearly forgotten it

    Source: http://www.travelsouthyorkshire.com/...et.aspx?id=923
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    The people on virgin trains are starting to wake up whoever pretends to be asleep to check their tickets, as so many people pretend to be asleep to prevent buying a ticket, so I wouldn't recommend that. Your ticket will get checked again as you leave Euston anyways.
    Why not just book in advance using a railcard and it'll be cheaper or get the bus as someone else said?

    Oh and I think in London all children get free transport and they require proof of ID for this then get a photographic card so you might be checked once you're in London. Coming back you'd also be checked and they always ask for my railcard in Euston so would ask for proof of a child ticket too. It's not worth the risk imo
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    (Original post by Wookie42)
    Going to sleep is a very good idea. I'm a sneaky git, and have traveled on trains without paying quite a few times. The best method is to pretend you're asleep, hands down

    Since you are paying for a ticket though, unless you get a real a-hole of a conductor you'll have no problems. As others have said, who has ID when they're under 16? First time most people have ID is when they get their provisional I would've thought.
    I have wondered about this, even though I always have a ticket, I have put it to the test. But quite often, I am actually asleep for real.

    Almost every time, the conductors carrying out a full check of all tickets which often happens on intercity trains in and out of London, the conductor has woken me to check my ticket.

    The only time they haven't is when its a regional branch line with many stops and they check after every station. Except it's hard to remember all the faces that you have already checked and they will often just walk through the train saying "Any tickets from X". Although quite often they are good at remembering who they haven't seen before and will ask to see your ticket or wake you if you are asleep.

    Besides, once you get to Euston, your ticket will have to go in the barrier, and it will flash up "child". Good luck pretending you are asleep when you do that.

    Some railway services in London require you to have a child fare card with your ticket to show you are eligible for the child fare.
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    (Original post by marcusfox)
    Besides, once you get to Euston, your ticket will have to go in the barrier, and it will flash up "child". Good luck pretending you are asleep when you do that.
    I'm pretty sure there are no barriers at Euston for Virgin Trains. At least, I have never had to go through any for trains from London to Birmingham.

    Regarding Under 16 photocards - these exist in the West Midlands as well, administered by Centro (the local Passenger Transport Executive) so they apply on all local transport services. As buses are the main mode of transport here, their main use is that bus drivers can ask to see one when we try to buy a child fare. Based on what people have said on this thread it looks like they exist in a lot of places for local travel, but as far as I know there is no national standard which would mean ticket inspectors can demand to see one.
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    I got the train from Cambridge to Stansted Airport at 4am with a friend and got away as a child with no questions asked (I'm 16, he's 17). I also get child tickets to London as they're half the price and apparently I look young.
    Then again, I only really ever go to London for concerts now. When it's really busy, the ticket people don't even seem to notice when it flashes up as child. The only time I've ever had a problem when was I was about 14, oddly enough. I'm like Benjamin Button.
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    (Original post by thefish_uk)
    I'm pretty sure there are no barriers at Euston for Virgin Trains. At least, I have never had to go through any for trains from London to Birmingham.

    Regarding Under 16 photocards - these exist in the West Midlands as well, administered by Centro (the local Passenger Transport Executive) so they apply on all local transport services. As buses are the main mode of transport here, their main use is that bus drivers can ask to see one when we try to buy a child fare. Based on what people have said on this thread it looks like they exist in a lot of places for local travel, but as far as I know there is no national standard which would mean ticket inspectors can demand to see one.
    Ah, well it's at least 8 years since I travelled out of Euston, and then only once. Nevertheless, I'm sure there is a manual staffed ticket barrier of sorts at times.

    Besides, the OP doesn't want to be travelling on Virgin if he wants to save money. LMR only fares are about half as expensive as the any permitted ones that can be used on Virgin.
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    (Original post by thefish_uk)
    I'm pretty sure there are no barriers at Euston for Virgin Trains. At least, I have never had to go through any for trains from London to Birmingham.

    Regarding Under 16 photocards - these exist in the West Midlands as well, administered by Centro (the local Passenger Transport Executive) so they apply on all local transport services. As buses are the main mode of transport here, their main use is that bus drivers can ask to see one when we try to buy a child fare. Based on what people have said on this thread it looks like they exist in a lot of places for local travel, but as far as I know there is no national standard which would mean ticket inspectors can demand to see one.
    There aren't barriers but when the OP goes back to Crewe from London they often stand and check tickets and may ask for ID then.
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    (Original post by MutantGecko)
    i have a job interview in london soon.. i will be travelling from crewe to london euston, and will be booking the tickets soon.

    i would like to get a child ticket as they are around half the price, but could i get away with a child ticket (im 17 but look about 13)? or are they really strict with this sort of thing?

    thanks for any help
    If they catch you you will be thrown from the moving train
 
 
 
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