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Is it realistic of me to consider career in law? watch

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    I'll keep it short and sweet. I'm a mature student (24) and will be studying at UCL for a non law degree. I know there are avenues one can take into the legal profession without an undergraduate law degree but I've read some posters on here state that obtaining a GDL can be a waste of time although admittedly I can't remember the context in which it was written.

    I'd really appreciate an honest and knowledgeable opinion on whether this is something I should consider pursuing.
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    oh dear you have read to many posts (probably from tsr user 'imsoacademic' ) but in reality there are plenty of solicitors in top law firms who have done a GDL and might I add gone too far worse universities than yours. You have nothing to worry about as you would very easily get into a more regional smaller firm if you didnt fancy all the interviews . However I must warn against a career as a barrister...even for UCL law grads who are second to oxbridge are stuggling...if you have a first then go for it but still dont expect anything. so to sum up its a good idea to practice as a solicitor, also do some research on exams for higher rights of audience...thts like a barrister...tht could be your route ...hope it helps...if you could tell me your degree class....and possibly A levels..if yu did them it might make a more rounder picture
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    (Original post by Busby_Babe)
    I'll keep it short and sweet. I'm a mature student (24) and will be studying at UCL for a non law degree. I know there are avenues one can take into the legal profession without an undergraduate law degree but I've read some posters on here state that obtaining a GDL can be a waste of time although admittedly I can't remember the context in which it was written.

    I'd really appreciate an honest and knowledgeable opinion on whether this is something I should consider pursuing.
    This isn't really enough information to enable us to advise you.

    What area of law do you want to go into? What is your pre-university history? What are you studying? Are you able to self-fund through the GDL phase?
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    It depends, can you argue your case?
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    chill guys let the user explain
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    (Original post by lionboy)
    chill guys let the user explain
    Eh?
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    (Original post by chalks)
    Eh?
    busby babe has yet to explain her a levels, degree class and subject and work esperience ect ect an field of law
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    If all else fails... Prostitution.
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    (Original post by lionboy)
    oh dear you have read to many posts (probably from tsr user 'imsoacademic' ) but in reality there are plenty of solicitors in top law firms who have done a GDL and might I add gone too far worse universities than yours. You have nothing to worry about as you would very easily get into a more regional smaller firm if you didnt fancy all the interviews . However I must warn against a career as a barrister...even for UCL law grads who are second to oxbridge are stuggling...if you have a first then go for it but still dont expect anything. so to sum up its a good idea to practice as a solicitor, also do some research on exams for higher rights of audience...thts like a barrister...tht could be your route ...hope it helps...if you could tell me your degree class....and possibly A levels..if yu did them it might make a more rounder picture
    I think it was 'imsoacademic'

    (Original post by chalks)
    This isn't really enough information to enable us to advise you.

    What area of law do you want to go into? What is your pre-university history? What are you studying? Are you able to self-fund through the GDL phase?
    I haven't thought about it that deeply although criminal law would be a dream. I left School and worked in sales before working for Manchester United. I started A-levels in Law, English Literature and History after school (actually got 100% on my first law module ) and was in the process of organising UCAS applications when my father became mentally ill and I had to leave college and start working as it was only me and him in the household. He passed away sadly and I started an access course and got distinctions across the board although in all honesty that's like saying I won a race against a man with a broken leg (no disrespect it gave me a second chance). Got accepted into UCL on what I can only assume was the strength of my Personal statement, piece of work they asked for and an interview.

    Sorry for the life story but yeah it's a little complicated
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    (Original post by lionboy)
    busby babe has yet to explain her a levels, degree class and subject and work esperience ect ect an field of law
    (Original post by crazycake93)
    If all else fails... Prostitution.
    I'm a guy

    Busby Babe is a reference to the Busby Babes. I'm only just starting at UCL but I'm fully aware anything less than a 2:1 means this would be impossible. I'm also willing to take A-level exams over the summer if need be and of course will be looking for any possible work experience. That's why I made this thread in part for advice regarding what I should do. Subject is Bsc Archaeology.
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    (Original post by Busby_Babe)
    I think it was 'imsoacademic'



    I haven't thought about it that deeply although criminal law would be a dream. I left School and worked in sales before working for Manchester United. I started A-levels in Law, English Literature and History after school (actually got 100% on my first law module ) and was in the process of organising UCAS applications when my father became mentally ill and I had to leave college and start working as it was only me and him in the household. He passed away sadly and I started an access course and got distinctions across the board although in all honesty that's like saying I won a race against a man with a broken leg (no disrespect it gave me a second chance). Got accepted into UCL on what I can only assume was the strength of my Personal statement, piece of work they asked for and an interview.

    Sorry for the life story but yeah it's a little complicated


    i knew it would be lol....ermmmm in terms of a levels stuff then if you can get a mitigating circumstance of why UCL let you in as proof then firms will look past this...if not then you will have to have an additional document explaining this without proof 'proof' being the key word on lack of A levels...but access court may still be accepted.
    The point still stands, dont hold your breath for a career as a barrister but its more than attainable to get a really strong career as a soliciotr specializing in criminal law...then perhaps take your higher rights course and become a 'criminal' barrister with X number of years backing you up
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    (Original post by Busby_Babe)
    I think it was 'imsoacademic'



    I haven't thought about it that deeply although criminal law would be a dream. I left School and worked in sales before working for Manchester United. I started A-levels in Law, English Literature and History after school (actually got 100% on my first law module ) and was in the process of organising UCAS applications when my father became mentally ill and I had to leave college and start working as it was only me and him in the household. He passed away sadly and I started an access course and got distinctions across the board although in all honesty that's like saying I won a race against a man with a broken leg (no disrespect it gave me a second chance). Got accepted into UCL on what I can only assume was the strength of my Personal statement, piece of work they asked for and an interview.

    Sorry for the life story but yeah it's a little complicated
    If you're not interested in corporate law, then your chances are likely to be higher. The City firms are, as I'm sure you're aware, incredibly competitive.

    Other posters such as Nulli Tertius can probably shed some light on the realities of criminal work - you need to be very aware of what it will mean in practice.

    Many firms will want to know why you did a degree in Archaeology and what has drawn you to the law. You'll need a convincing explanation. Equally, you'll need to explain what work you've been doing for the last 6 years.

    (Original post by lionboy)
    i knew it would be lol....ermmmm in terms of a levels stuff then if you can get a mitigating circumstance of why UCL let you in as proof then firms will look past this...if not then you will have to have an additional document explaining this without proof 'proof' being the key word on lack of A levels...but access court may still be accepted.
    The point still stands, dont hold your breath for a career as a barrister but its more than attainable to get a really strong career as a soliciotr specializing in criminal law...then perhaps take your higher rights course and become a 'criminal' barrister with X number of years backing you up
    Getting your Higher Rights doesn't make you a barrister.
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    (Original post by chalks)
    If you're not interested in corporate law, then your chances are likely to be higher. The City firms are, as I'm sure you're aware, incredibly competitive.

    Other posters such as Nulli Tertius can probably shed some light on the realities of criminal work - you need to be very aware of what it will mean in practice.

    Many firms will want to know why you did a degree in Archaeology and what has drawn you to the law. You'll need a convincing explanation. Equally, you'll need to explain what work you've been doing for the last 6 years.



    Getting your Higher Rights doesn't make you a barrister.

    actually it gives you the similar status so you can stand up in court to advocate a case as a barrister does
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    who ever gave me posative rep is ruining my hard work...it took me ages to get to minus 7 .... why would people ruin this ???
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    (Original post by lionboy)
    i knew it would be lol....ermmmm in terms of a levels stuff then if you can get a mitigating circumstance of why UCL let you in as proof then firms will look past this...if not then you will have to have an additional document explaining this without proof 'proof' being the key word on lack of A levels...but access court may still be accepted.
    The point still stands, dont hold your breath for a career as a barrister but its more than attainable to get a really strong career as a soliciotr specializing in criminal law...then perhaps take your higher rights course and become a 'criminal' barrister with X number of years backing you up
    Thanks. The access course is technically the same level as A-levels although I think it would be ludicrous to think Distinctions on an AC are equivalent to A's at A-level. I know Cambridge have accepted people from Access courses this year and I'm attending UCL so obviously the Universities see them as a legitimate alternative but whether a competitive law firm will is another matter.
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    (Original post by lionboy)
    actually it gives you the similar status so you can stand up in court to advocate a case as a barrister does
    Thanks, having qualified as a solicitor-advocate in 2003, I'm aware of the scope of the role.

    It's important to be clear: having Higher Rights does not make you a barrister - it simply enables you to appear before certain courts.
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    (Original post by Busby_Babe)
    Thanks. The access course is technically the same level as A-levels although I think it would be ludicrous to think Distinctions on an AC are equivalent to A's at A-level. I know Cambridge have accepted people from Access courses this year and I'm attending UCL so obviously the Universities see them as a legitimate alternative but whether a competitive law firm will is another matter.
    yeh i thought they were similar, also iv done some scan reading on some higher firms and they accept equivalants...guessing tht your in UCL will mean you were fairly succesfull at your access course to so im not seeing it as a hinderance...definately go for the GDL / or if you fancy two years a post grad law(i know bristol do an interesting MA in law whuch will def help you) but the important thing is to stick at it and remember that there will be many other soliciotrs who arrived much later in the game and are equally as succesfull
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    (Original post by chalks)
    Thanks, having qualified as a solicitor-advocate in 2003, I'm aware of the scope of the role.

    It's important to be clear: having Higher Rights does not make you a barrister - it simply enables you to appear before certain courts.
    ....i was merely suggesting possible routes into the criminal law field...an appearing before courts gives a fairly similar role to a barrister but side steps alot of the trauma attched to attempting a career at the bar...the sarcasm isnt really appreciated...if you had given your qualifications to back up your statements from early on then im sure you would have been listened to but you have tried to play it as a trump card...quite frankly im starting to believe you made it up:rolleyes:
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    (Original post by lionboy)
    ....i was merely suggesting possible routes into the criminal law field...an appearing before courts gives a fairly similar role to a barrister but side steps alot of the trauma attched to attempting a career at the bar...the sarcasm isnt really appreciated...if you had given your qualifications to back up your statements from early on then im sure you would have been listened to but you have tried to play it as a trump card...quite frankly im starting to believe you made it up:rolleyes:
    Believe what you like. You'll see from my other posts on this forum that I have some degree of experience in the legal field.

    Your advice was incorrect. I corrected it for the purpose of the OP. When you started trying to explain to me what Higher Rights meant I thought you should be aware of my experience.

    The OP should also be aware that it's possible to undertake a reasonable amount of criminal advocacy work in the Mags without needing HRs.
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    (Original post by chalks)
    Believe what you like. You'll see from my other posts on this forum that I have some degree of experience in the legal field.

    Your advice was incorrect. I corrected it for the purpose of the OP. When you started trying to explain to me what Higher Rights meant I thought you should be aware of my experience.

    The OP should also be aware that it's possible to undertake a reasonable amount of criminal advocacy work in the Mags without needing HRs.
    okay apart from defining nothing about the higher rights course...par arguing with me over the extent and accessability the course grants you...you have not helped the OP concerning the issue of 'doing a GDL' .
    Also if you have graduated higher rights in 2003 it would mean you would have at least been 24/5 when you attained this ...add seven years and it would make you the lighter end of thirty...its 2 in the morning and im now questioning whether or not your a solicitor...im very sure the hours they work are around 12+ ....do you even work as a solicitor ???? im nearing to passing you off as a fail
 
 
 
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