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Howard
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#121
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#121
(Original post by fishpaste)
Yep, exactly.
Well, don't you think that might effect the supply of teachers?
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amexblack
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#122
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#122
(Original post by Ben.S.)
Paradox? Nope - I don't think I created one of those just then.

How can an education be intermediate? An education is not something which itself can be split into timeframes, it is something continual throughout one's life.

Back to your original post ....
(Original post by Ben.S.)
I'm at Cambridge - it's about 50:50 state:independent here. Paying an extortionate amount of money for an intermediate education (which doesn't seem to make much of a difference) is a bit odd - but people are free to waste their money as they see fit.
Simply because you are at cambridge, and that half of the students at cambridge are from state school, you imply that public school is a waste of money (presumably because, hey, if you can get into Cambridge from a state school, what the hell is the point in going to a private school?!) . My point is that you have seemed to missed the point of public school entirely - and that it's not all about getting a place at cambridge. The playing fields, swimming pools, tennis courts and boathouses .. what are they? worth spending money on? Sure, some parents might send their children to public school purely so that they will get into oxbridge. But the vast majority simply wanted the best facilities and the best education for their children. That doesn't seem in the least bit odd to me.
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AT82
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#123
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#123
(Original post by Howard)
Yes. Most people would prefer to work for someone that pays $5000 a year more than someone else. Believe it or not, people go to work to earn money to do such selfish things as pay their mortgages, and not for the benefit of society.
They go to work (according to maslow) to satisify their basic needs. After this it all about job satisifation this is why a lot of teachers prefer working in innercity schools as they can actually make a different and a real impact on kids lives.
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happysunshine
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#124
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#124
(Original post by amexblack)

Simply because you are at cambridge, and that half of the students at cambridge are from state school, you imply that public school is a waste of money (presumably because, hey, if you can get into Cambridge from a state school, what the hell is the point in going to a private school) . My point is that you have seemed to missed the point of public school entirely - and that it's not all about getting a place at cambridge. The playing fields, swimming pools, tennis courts and boathouses .. what are they? worth spending money on? Sure, some parents might send their children to public school purely so that they will get into oxbridge. But the vast majority simply wanted the best facilities and the best education for their children.
I didn't see that post by BenS, seems very accurate. And at a private school you don't get the education of life.
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Kurdt Morello
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#125
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#125
(Original post by happysunshine)
I didn't see that post by BenS, seems very accurate. And at a private school you don't get the education of life.
well go to a private school yet live in a rough area - there's ur life training!!!
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pedy1986
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#126
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#126
(Original post by happysunshine)
I didn't see that post by BenS, seems very accurate. And at a private school you don't get the education of life.
You don't get an education in life? Well this is news to me, yes I admit in my private school I don't have the pleasure of people throwing chairs and arranging fights for 4pm on the playground. However, this is not an life education, these things are understood and found out in other areas outside school.
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me!
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#127
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#127
(Original post by Kurdt Morello)
well go to a private school yet live in a rough area - there's ur life training!!!
I live in a roughish area and go to a 'rough' school
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pedy1986
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#128
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#128
(Original post by me!)
I live in a roughish area and go to a 'rough' school
so surely your education is not giving you an ideal 'life' education?
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fishpaste
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#129
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#129
(Original post by Howard)
Well, don't you think that might effect the supply of teachers?
Not drastically. Given that less than 20% of teachers are in the private sector. And of these, many were poached for their experience and talent from the state sector where they probably earned quite an economic rent anyway. There's also the aspect to consider that class sizes are smaller in private schools anyway, less pupils per teacher ratio.

The most important thing though, is that skilled experienced teachers would be available for the state sector which badly needs them. A huge gain for the 85% of kids in private education. Surely a net benefit.
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Howard
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#130
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#130
(Original post by fishpaste)
I'm so glad you finally agree with me, poaching
Poaching is a form of theft. We are talking about a private schooling system which induces teachers to work for them by increased benefits.
That's called a competitive advantage. Not theft.

By your rationale you might pick out any number of sucessful firms in the private sector and come to the conclusion that they are too competitive for other, not so sucessful firms. What's your solution here? "Redistribute" one firms assets to another firm in the name of "equity"
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fishpaste
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#131
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#131
(Original post by Howard)
Poaching is a form of theft. We are talking about a private schooling system which induces teachers to work for them by increased benefits.
That's called a competitive advantage. Not theft.

By your rationale you might pick out any number of sucessful firms in the private sector and come to the conclusion that they are too competitive for other, not so sucessful firms. What's your solution here? "Redistribute" one firms assets to another firm in the name of "equity"

Are you familiar with the way the UK poaches nurses and teachers from the 3rd world? It's the same principle. Poaching is the term used there, poaching is the term used here.

I've already explained why education is not your bog standard economic good, like a car, or a 56 inch plasma TV.
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me!
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#132
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#132
(Original post by corey)
so surely your education is not giving you an ideal 'life' education?
Yep it is, at least I think so... because I have to mix with different people and put up with a lot of bad stuff but also do learn stuff and learn to teach myself, to supplement what I learn at school... I'm educated socially and academically, I've had some pretty bad experiences but also some very good ones... damn I forgot what I was gonna say...
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Helenia
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#133
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#133
(Original post by happysunshine)
I didn't see that post by BenS, seems very accurate. And at a private school you don't get the education of life.
You do, just a different kind of life.
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happysunshine
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#134
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#134
(Original post by Kurdt Morello)
well go to a private school yet live in a rough area - there's ur life training!!!
That would be the perfect 'training'!
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Tnacilppa
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#135
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#135
(Original post by fishpaste)
Are you familiar with the way the UK poaches nurses and teachers from the 3rd world? It's the same principle. Poaching is the term used there, poaching is the term used here.

I've already explained why education is not your bog standard economic good, like a car, or a 56 inch plasma TV.
Fishpaste get a grip.

Teachers can CHOOSE where they want to teach. Obviously, the majority want to teach at private schools as they are nicer generally. As the first choice, private schools obviously have more choice as to who to accept.

No-one is doing any poaching. The teachers choose. It is not the fault of the private schools that they are the preffered option.

Adam
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fishpaste
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#136
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#136
(Original post by Tnacilppa)
Fishpaste get a grip.

Teachers can CHOOSE where they want to teach. Obviously, the majority want to teach at private schools as they are nicer generally. As the first choice, private schools obviously have more choice as to who to accept.

No-one is doing any poaching. The teachers choose. It is not the fault of the private schools that they are the preffered option.

Adam
How is this not poaching? When we steal workers from developing countries, is this not the same thing?
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Tek
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#137
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#137
(Original post by fishpaste)
I've already explained why education is not your bog standard economic good, like a car, or a 56 inch plasma TV.
Really? In what way is it different? My family is rich, so we can afford nice long holidays, flashy cars, a big house and public schooling. Ahh the benefits of being rich. Isn't capitalism beautiful?
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fishpaste
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#138
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#138
http://education.guardian.co.uk/high...073288,00.html

If anybody does not understand my analogy, read this.

I'm arguing that the way in which the UK is poaching teachers from developing nations as described in the article is exactly the same way in which the private sector is poaching from the state.
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fishpaste
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#139
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#139
(Original post by Tek)
Really? In what way is it different? My family is rich, so we can afford nice long holidays, flashy cars, a big house and public schooling. Ahh the benefits of being rich. Isn't capitalism beautiful?

I'm very glad you can afford the first four, it's providing people with incentive to work. But education is different! It's an essential right for everybody, and nobody should be deprived of their ability to succeed in life because of their parents' salaries and attitudes. Just to clarify, you might not have a fast car as a child, but this won't prevent you being able to afford a fast car in the future. Depriving poor children of good teaching will.
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happysunshine
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#140
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#140
(Original post by Tek)
Really? In what way is it different? My family is rich, so we can afford nice long holidays, flashy cars, a big house and public schooling. Ahh the benefits of being rich. Isn't capitalism beautiful?
hmm... what job do your parents do?

My parents are still waiting to win the lottery.
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