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    (Original post by medbh4805)
    Yes her or possibly the tutor from Oxford. It was when they were saying that they interview virtually all Classics applicants (unless your application was really bad), because generally the standard is so high whereas in other subjects they reject a lot without interview.
    I'd have thought it's more because there are few enough applicants that they have time to interview them all, which isn't the case for more oversubscribed subjects.
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    (Original post by BJack)
    I'd have thought it's more because there are few enough applicants that they have time to interview them all, which isn't the case for more oversubscribed subjects.
    I can only go by what they told us :dontknow: Though that's probably an element of it too.
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    (Original post by lalaberlin)
    you're however saying that maths is the easiest subject to get into, aren't you? maybe for the 14 year old kid, but you clearly haven't seen anything of the oxbridge maths department not to mention the selection process for maths applicants.
    The fact that a 14 year old has been accepted to read the course can be explained by him being born with a genius mind and a genuine interest in maths + hard work, so that he is able to be at the same level at maths as someone who graduated from high school, so maybe for him and him alone it wasn't particularly difficult to get into the course... because he doesn't consider the work he put in as effort or hard work but as pleasure
    Think you are (deliberately or not) missing the point Joinedup was making. Maths is a subject that some people have a clear intrinsic ability for, undoubtably because if you are good enough then lots of things just follow "obviously" from the basics. Maths is the only subject that can be realistically built up by someone on their own working on a piece of paper without needing to be taught a great deal of facts or in the case of arts subjects, being exposed to the contrary ideas of others. Obviously everyone will need some input but I do think that the approach is fundamentally different and so some people will find it easier to get into maths than anybody else forother subjects.

    I am intrigued by you questioning joinedup's experience of the maths selection process- does your experience give you reason to disagree with his points...I'd say that it backed him up quite well.
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    The acceptance rate for theology peaked in 1996 at 73.7%. By 2005 it had bottomed out out 33.6%. The latest figures are 36.8%
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    (Original post by bcrazy)
    Think you are (deliberately or not) missing the point Joinedup was making. Maths is a subject that some people have a clear intrinsic ability for, undoubtably because if you are good enough then lots of things just follow "obviously" from the basics. Maths is the only subject that can be realistically built up by someone on their own working on a piece of paper without needing to be taught a great deal of facts or in the case of arts subjects, being exposed to the contrary ideas of others. Obviously everyone will need some input but I do think that the approach is fundamentally different and so some people will find it easier to get into maths than anybody else forother subjects.
    I am intrigued by you questioning joinedup's experience of the maths selection process- does your experience give you reason to disagree with his points...I'd say that it backed him up quite well.
    No, first of all, I think the point you're making here about maths applies to almost all science subjects, in the same way some people will find it easier to get into say physics or computer science than other people for other subjects.
    Of course I wouldn't argue with you that everything you or Joinedup have said is true, there is no question about that but I still think that you're not answering OP's question.. When I refer to the maths selection process and intake figures, my point is to show that what you've said applies to the 20% of applicants who got an offer, so for them it probably wasn't very hard, but if you ask the other 80% who got rejected, they will tell you that it's the hardest thing in the world to get into Oxbridge to read maths.
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    I'd say Medicine and Law are the hardest, but the others are more or less on par. Maybe theology, but there's very little difference. I really don't think there's an easiest subject - they're all competitive and you have to stand out and be genuinely interested. You can't just apply for a subject at Oxbridge because it's the easiest one to get in for, if your heart isn't really there - the admissions tutors would spot you a mile away!
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    (Original post by Rascacielos)
    I'd say Medicine and Law are the hardest, but the others are more or less on par. Maybe theology, but there's very little difference. I really don't think there's an easiest subject - they're all competitive and you have to stand out and be genuinely interested. You can't just apply for a subject at Oxbridge because it's the easiest one to get in for, if your heart isn't really there - the admissions tutors would spot you a mile away!
    The problematic subject is Economics & Management which has an acceptance rate of less than 8%.

    It is also believed that it is affecting Access initiatives as a disproportionate number of the the state school applicants to Oxford are applying for this course.

    It would not surprise me if over the next couple of years Oxford decides "something must be done" e.g. automatic reconsideration for PPE or by making it a Finals only subject (Oxford hasn't had one of these for many years) into which people switch after Mods.
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    The problematic subject is Economics & Management which has an acceptance rate of less than 8%.

    It is also believed that it is affecting Access initiatives as a disproportionate number of the the state school applicants to Oxford are applying for this course.

    It would not surprise me if over the next couple of years Oxford decides "something must be done" e.g. automatic reconsideration for PPE or by making it a Finals only subject (Oxford hasn't had one of these for many years) into which people switch after Mods.
    Ah, yes, I knew I'd missed one out.
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    (Original post by lalaberlin)
    No, first of all ... to read maths.
    (Original post by bcrazy)
    Think you are (deliberately or not) missing the ... quite well.


    You people have missed the point that these 'prodigies' are actually extremely good at all subjects, and they would get an offer from any one of them. It just so happens that maths is the best subject, which is why whenever you hear about a <17 year old getting in to Oxbridge it's usually maths related.

    I usually hate talking about my subject like this.
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    (Original post by lalaberlin)
    but I still think that you're not answering OP's question.. When I refer to the maths selection process and intake figures, my point is to show that what you've said applies to the 20% of applicants who got an offer, so for them it probably wasn't very hard
    I think the problem is that the OP's question was so inherently flawed (as has been pointed out) that it is impossible to answer it as it was asked and the main problem is in the interpretation of it.
    Joinedup seemed to answer along the lines of "For the best in each subject, which is the easiest to get in for" and it was his answer to this question that I was agreeing with. I have already given most of my reasoning for that, but would just add that the top 10 in each year for maths would stand out so much through natural ability that it would be extremely easy for them to get in, even comparative to the top 10 in other subjects (even those such as Physics that are still somewhat more knowledge based...compsci may be an exception as it requires the same sort of logical deduction as maths).

    (Original post by refref)
    You people have missed the point that these 'prodigies' are actually extremely good at all subjects, and they would get an offer from any one of them.
    Whilst undoubtably most of these prodigies are good at other subjects, I think the gap is much more notable in maths. I would also note that it is not rare for such people to be somewhere on the autistic spectrum (I say this as a mathematician myself who is now a teacher) and such traits aren't quite as suited to more arty subjects!
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    In theory, Classics is one of the easiest but because it's quite a niche subject have to compete against more hardcore nerds than the average
 
 
 
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