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    Pretty misleading title, but I wasn't sure how to word it and even if I did it wouldn't have fitted in the title box.

    Anyway, what I mean is: Is there anything wrong with just looking to get the grades rather than knowing everything there is to know about the subject? I find it really annoying that there's so many people that:

    1. Can copy down things/write notes down from a board/book and actually take things in and learn it

    and

    2. People who seem to remember everything that is said and memorise every single little fact.

    I can't do either and it annoys me how people seem to appear smart through all these amazing test scores when all they've done is memorise everything that is said to them in note heavy subjects: Biology, Geography etc.

    I much prefer subjects such as English and Maths when it's less about memorising everything and more about actually applying your on knowledge and using your brain. Problem solving is what I like I guess and analysing things.

    So what am I trying to say? At school is it ok to actually just 'get by' by getting the best grades possible? I'm never going to be one of those people who can reel off tonnes of facts and things they've memorised. This really annoys me as they aren't really smart, they're lucky.

    / Sorry rant over I guess. :confused:
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    The only comment I can make is that whilst knowledge is always important whatever the subject, the more advanced the studies the less important it becomes as a percentage of the skills needed to succeed. The Scottish exams test knowledge and understanding and problem solving with the latter becoming more significant the further your studies take you. For instance AH Maths, I understand, requires reasonably well developed problem solving skills, knowledge alone does not lead to success.

    I am similar in that knowledge itself will not stick in my brain, however if I really understand something from first principles that understanding does stick and is retained. It is often more difficult and time consuming to truly understand, however the time spent is not wasted as the knowledge arising from the understanding may well stick with you for life. ( I recall quite a lot of school physics from over 30 years ago because I understood the underlying ideas, I never use it in my working life, but it is still in my head. On the other hand I studied French at school by sheer memory with no real underlying ideas about the structure of the language, I am now lucky if I can remember 20 words and phrases)
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    (Original post by DJKL)
    The only comment I can make is that whilst knowledge is always important whatever the subject, the more advanced the studies the less important it becomes as a percentage of the skills needed to succeed. The Scottish exams test knowledge and understanding and problem solving with the latter becoming more significant the further your studies take you. For instance AH Maths, I understand, requires reasonably well developed problem solving skills, knowledge alone does not lead to success.

    I am similar in that knowledge itself will not stick in my brain, however if I really understand something from first principles that understanding does stick and is retained. It is often more difficult and time consuming to truly understand, however the time spent is not wasted as the knowledge arising from the understanding may well stick with you for life. ( I recall quite a lot of school physics from over 30 years ago because I understood the underlying ideas, I never use it in my working life, but it is still in my head. On the other hand I studied French at school by sheer memory with no real underlying ideas about the structure of the language, I am now lucky if I can remember 20 words and phrases)

    So I'm in a better position being good at Problem Solving rather than having a good memory than the other way around?

    Let's just say at the moment: I am Person A and there is a Person B who is bad at problem solving but has a good memory. Here's the circumstances:

    At Standard Grade:

    Person B could have a good enough memory to learn everything he needs to know and guarantee passing his exam.

    Person A could use knowledge he has of the subject by just learning what is going to come up rather than every single thing about the course.

    Yet at Advanced Higher it is more important to beable to adapt your knowledge to certain contexts and sitiuations, puttign Person A at an advantage?
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    (Original post by JaggySnake95)
    So I'm in a better position being good at Problem Solving rather than having a good memory than the other way around?

    Let's just say at the moment: I am Person A and there is a Person B who is bad at problem solving but has a good memory. Here's the circumstances:

    At Standard Grade:

    Person B could have a good enough memory to learn everything he needs to know and guarantee passing his exam.

    Person A could use knowledge he has of the subject by just learning what is going to come up rather than every single thing about the course.

    Yet at Advanced Higher it is more important to beable to adapt your knowledge to certain contexts and sitiuations, puttign Person A at an advantage?
    I am not a teacher, however from my discussions over they years at parent/ teacher evenings for my children, the teachers certainly stressed that where a pupil was maybe marginal to be considered for Higher/ Advanced Higher based on their previous overall standard grade (or Higher) level result, good problem solving but weak knowledge was preferred to good knowledge but weak problem solving.

    However you do need both. My son had sound problem solving skills but a somewhat lax approach to acquiring some of the basic knowledge for his school courses, he did pass them, got into a decent University, initially tried the same approach there and found that without enough graft his innate problem solving was not enough. Luckily he realized the error of his ways and since the first term appears to be on the right track.

    From my experience if you cannot merely read facts and retain them you need to learn to study by other methods; mind maps, mnemonics (every good boy deserves favour/ George eats cooking apples/ROYGBIV) for example. For me it was always past papers and working out where I had gone wrong, the act of investigating where/why I had gone awry seemed to embed knowledge into my brain that mere reading of a text book never did.
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    unfortunately, gcse, as, and even a2 seem to revolve around mindless spunging and spewing of information, which ever way you look at it. Even subjects designed to promote freedom of thought such as philosophy offer hardly any marks for your evaluative skills.
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    Well there's nothing wrong with memorizing everything and making good grades, but I personally feel that there is more to learning that makes education great.

    There are things like writing, philosophy, etc. that require oen to think and provide their own oppinions on something rather than spitting out crystaline knowledge, and I personally like those subject areas more.
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    What I'm saying is: I feel I'm better at subjects that actually require you to think but I still obviously want good grades for obvious reasons. So what I'm saying is there's nothing wrong with just aiming for really good grades even if you don't 100% understand the subject due to all the facts you need to learn?
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    (Original post by JaggySnake95)
    What I'm saying is: I feel I'm better at subjects that actually require you to think but I still obviously want good grades for obvious reasons. So what I'm saying is there's nothing wrong with just aiming for really good grades even if you don't 100% understand the subject due to all the facts you need to learn?
    I agree with you, I didn't wholly understand some of my GCSE subjects and just looked at the actual exam technique - passed everything and got good grades.
 
 
 
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