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undergrad, postgrad, then lecturer at same uni? watch

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    Hello guys!
    have any of you considered studying till phd level at their institution and then work there ? or study there for either undergrad or postgrad, then come bac kand work as an academic?
    What do you think of this?
    I quite like my uni and I would not mind doing this, but sometimes I tell myself, it's probably better to experience another environment.
    Thanks a lot!
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    It probably won't be as easy as you imagine. Getting academic positions is quite hard, so it won't be a A -> B -> C tick box exercise like you're making it out to sound.

    And really, staying in the same place for so many years isn't that great. I think everyone has those feelings of wanting to stay in their uni city forever, but when your student days end and all your friends move away it's not all it's cracked up to be. Much better to see where the job takes you and move wherever. But I guess a lot of it depends on how much stability you like to have. If you stay in one place, it's can harm you career progress though (unless you work in a career that is focused in London).
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    (Original post by Svenjamin)
    It probably won't be as easy as you imagine. Getting academic positions is quite hard, so it won't be a A -> B -> C tick box exercise like you're making it out to sound.

    And really, staying in the same place for so many years isn't that great. I think everyone has those feelings of wanting to stay in their uni city forever, but when your student days end and all your friends move away it's not all it's cracked up to be. Much better to see where the job takes you and move wherever. But I guess a lot of it depends on how much stability you like to have. If you stay in one place, it's can harm you career progress though (unless you work in a career that is focused in London).
    I am aware that it is not an easy process, but I like the fact that after so many years, I would be familiar with the place, maybe even know some people. I am worried I might go somewhere else and not like the atmosphere, the running of the department....
    It would be my first proper job (if we put aside jobs I will do to fund my studies), so I would like to teach somewhere I know already. Could you please develo on career progression and why it is better to go somewhere else?
    Thanks a lot!
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    One of my lecturers did exactly this, but as Svenjamin said: it's incredibly difficult.

    1) You would not be more advantaged than any other candidate, unless it was incredibly close. They'd still hire you on a basis of conferences and papers published, and how your research interests fit in with their department. Not 'familiarity with the university'.
    2) A big part of it will be luck. One of my lecturers did his undergrad/phd at my uni, but he said it was just pure luck that a vacancy came up just as he qualified and he was available to start straight away. The chances of you getting hired at your home uni is very low indeed. Once you've spent 7 years getting your qualifications, you'll be lucky to be hired by any uni, you won't be taking your pick of location. Most lecturers have to move at a moments notice to the other side of the country because an opening comes up!
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    Its not a bad idea. You'll come across alot of lecturers and Head of Departments who literally have spent their entire lives in one university. I dont see anything wrong with it, if you love a place then why cant you stay there? it becomes a part of you.
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    One of my lecturers did his degree at my university and has remained there since, and I guess he must be around 50 or so, so I guess it can be done.
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    Loads of people have done it in my uni, it seems reasonably common. It's more difficult these days, as funding is a bit harder to secure, but still do-able. Before you become an official lecturer, you have to do a postdoc, which is usually 3-5 years. If you think it's what you want to do and you like your uni, you should go for it
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    If you're adamant to stay in one place you have to wait for a job to come along, and if you want a promotion you need to wait for an opening (which usually means waiting for someone above you to leave or get promoted themselves), so it can mean a very slow progression. If you go wherever the best job is then you'll obviously be moving up the ladder a lot faster, both because you're taking the next progression as soon as you're ready for it and because you have more choice in jobs to apply for so can hopefully get something with better future prospects.

    Also staying in one place your entire career will blinker how you approach the job, because you won't know any other way of doing things. Working in lots of different places means you'll see how things are done differently, so you'll have more varied experience and know what bits you think works or doesn't work. In the end, that results in learning more and it looks much better on a CV (i.e. stay in one place and it may be even harder to get that promotion, unless you want to rely on nepotism). That's especially important if you eventually want to go for the top head of department or manager positions, where having a vision and new ideas is vital.

    And a third reason is if you stay in one place, you'll probably work with a dozen or so other people who also want to stay in the same place. When a promotion arises, you'll all be clamouring over it. Being prepared to move means you have more chances for the better jobs everyone's after. Staying in one place means you may only get one shot at a promotion every couple of years, miss out on it and you'll have to wait another few years.

    Obviously a lot of this depends on supply and demand. If you work in a career which is pretty widespread, like IT, you'll have plenty more options to stay in one city and still pick up varied experience. If you're wanting to stay within a university for your whole life, then chances are you won't have much choice. Personally, my job is literally one office in every major city, so I don't have any choice - it's either stay with my office or move somewhere else. That's probably why my advice sounds so pessimistic
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    It's much more difficult now than it used to be to stay in one place. Having experience of other institutions post-PhD (preferably international in many areas) is seen as such a massive advantage for most applicants for lecturing positions that it's almost a requirement for most subject areas.
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    (Original post by itzme)
    Hello guys!
    have any of you considered studying till phd level at their institution and then work there ? or study there for either undergrad or postgrad, then come bac kand work as an academic?
    What do you think of this?
    I quite like my uni and I would not mind doing this, but sometimes I tell myself, it's probably better to experience another environment.
    Thanks a lot!
    If you're good enough it's possible, but there's intense competition for jobs even among the best of the best. My friend may possibly fit that category though, she stayed on at her uni to do a Masters and now a PHD. As such they know her well and like her, and that's always a good way to go. She will I think be able to get a job as a reader (the way most people start). The department is secure against cuts.
    Still, this won't be the case for most uni's, especially given it's an Arts subject.
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    I know a mature student who did his undergrad at my uni, got a 1st and an award for how well he did, and hasnt done his masters yet (deferred it to this september) yet hes doing some teaching at my uni due to his expertise in it. This is music tech by the way.
 
 
 
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