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BIOL4 Biology Unit 4 Exam - 13th June 2011 watch

  • View Poll Results: Are you resitting this unit?
    YES!
    54.23%
    NO!
    45.77%

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    (Original post by coffee345)
    aww same i didnt do well either...i thought that jan's paper was harder than jan 2010 >.<

    I got a C....but just a C: 60 ums

    what do you need to get into uni?
    i need a B for uni

    hopefully i'll get it but i have had to re-sit all modules.....
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    Looking at the past papers, there are some really random questions such as the 15 marks about a shrew investigation, it wouldn't suprise me if AQA banged in a question about 'the increasing seal population in ethopia' or 'polar bears immigrating into foreign countries' :P

    ..... you never know with aqa x
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    (Original post by heskey 123)
    Looking at the past papers, there are some really random questions such as the 15 marks about a shrew investigation, it wouldn't suprise me if AQA banged in a question about 'the increasing seal population in ethopia' or 'polar bears immigrating into foreign countries' :P

    ..... you never know with aqa x
    I am doing that shrew question now :P.....thanks to AQA, I now hate shrews....
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    (Original post by heskey 123)
    Looking at the past papers, there are some really random questions such as the 15 marks about a shrew investigation, it wouldn't suprise me if AQA banged in a question about 'the increasing seal population in ethopia' or 'polar bears immigrating into foreign countries' :P

    ..... you never know with aqa x
    LOL
    probably.
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    (Original post by Kishanpatel)
    I am doing that shrew question now :P.....thanks to AQA, I now hate shrews....
    Never seen the shrew question! am guessing its in old paper



    Explain why vegatative propagation in plants often results in a clustered distribution(1 mark)

    Ive been told that was taken out from the syllabus

    someone please clarify
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    (Original post by coffee345)
    oh thanks !

    whatdid you get last time? or are you not resitting this paper?
    theres a much easier way to do this too btw.

    births - deaths = 15

    then 15/1000 = 1.5%

    so you just get the population size which is 107m and do

    107 x 1.015 = 108.605m
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    (Original post by SK-mar)
    theres a much easier way to do this too btw.

    births - deaths = 15

    then 15/1000 = 1.5%

    so you just get the population size which is 107m and do

    107 x 1.015 = 108.605m
    where did you get 1.015 from @[email protected]

    thanks btw
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    (Original post by coffee345)
    where did you get 1.015 from @[email protected]

    thanks btw
    in maths when you are doing percentage increase you times whatever your increasing by 1 + whatever the percentage is in decimal form.

    in this case 15/1000 = 1.5% = 0.015 in percentage form. therefore you add that to 1 to get 1.015 ....



    however, for many of these questions in biology there are other ways to do it for the non mathematicians (ie, the one that was first shown to you) but that method i just showed you is probably gcse standard maths or lower. its just quicker thats all....
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    I think for the last week before this exam we should do a thing I've seen in previous threads which is what I call 'rolling question time' .... we ask a question, it gets answered, and the person answering puts forward a question. obviously there will be multiple answers so just all post a question after your answer and people will answer them if they want etc....

    I will get the ball rolling with a nice one:

    Give 3 methods of species conservation and briefly explain each
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    (Original post by SK-mar)
    in maths when you are doing percentage increase you times whatever your increasing by 1 + whatever the percentage is in decimal form.

    in this case 15/1000 = 1.5% = 0.015 in percentage form. therefore you add that to 1 to get 1.015 ....



    however, for many of these questions in biology there are other ways to do it for the non mathematicians (ie, the one that was first shown to you) but that method i just showed you is probably gcse standard maths or lower. its just quicker thats all....
    lol okay...thanks
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    (Original post by SK-mar)
    I think for the last week before this exam we should do a thing I've seen in previous threads which is what I call 'rolling question time' .... we ask a question, it gets answered, and the person answering puts forward a question. obviously there will be multiple answers so just all post a question after your answer and people will answer them if they want etc....

    I will get the ball rolling with a nice one:

    Give 3 methods of species conservation and briefly explain each
    Finally done those questions asked earlier ...

    5 of them:

    1.Conserving fish : fish quotas

    Limit on amount of certain fish that fishermen are allowed to catch

    The limit is worked out by scientist
    ---------
    2.Conserving animals: Captive breeding programme

    Thats for species that are already extinct or endangered

    Animals with low population are bred in captivity to increase their population
    ---------
    3.Conserving plants: Using seedbank

    Lots of seed of lots of different species are stored and can be used when a plant species

    become extinct ( by replanting the extinct plant)
    -----
    4. Conserving Habitat: Protected areas

    National park-coppicing

    restricting urban development, industrial development and farming

    -----
    5. Conserving any organisms: Relocation

    Move species with very low population which are directly under threat to new area


    Thats all I remember ..
    Correct me if am wrong


    Here is another one:

    Describe and explain factors effecting the rate of photosynthesis (6 marks)
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    Co2 - Plants need this to for the calvin cycle, the higher the Co2 concentration the more RuBp is turuned into GP which is broken down to TP which produces glucose and other useful organic substances.

    Temp - PS will be directly proportional to the temp, between 0 and 25 the rate doubles for ever 10 increase. After that the PS level evens off and declines as the enzymes start to become denature and do not function properly.

    Light intensity - Light is used in the depended-reaction, the light excites the chlorophyll which excites electrons and goes down ETC to produce ATP. As the light intensity increases more electrons are excited.

    The rate of PS will be limited by the factor that is at its least favorable value.

    Correct?

    Describe the process of the Electron Transport Chain in the production of ATP (6 marks)



    (Original post by arvin_infinity)
    Finally done those questions asked earlier ...

    5 of them:

    1.Conserving fish : fish quotas

    Limit on amount of certain fish that fishermen are allowed to catch

    The limit is worked out by scientist
    ---------
    2.Conserving animals: Captive breeding programme

    Thats for species that are already extinct or endangered

    Animals with low population are bred in captivity to increase their population
    ---------
    3.Conserving plants: Using seedbank

    Lots of seed of lots of different species are stored and can be used when a plant species

    become extinct ( by replanting the extinct plant)
    -----
    4. Conserving Habitat: Protected areas

    National park-coppicing

    restricting urban development, industrial development and farming

    -----
    5. Conserving any organisms: Relocation

    Move species with very low population which are directly under threat to new area


    Thats all I remember ..
    Correct me if am wrong


    Here is another one:

    Describe and explain factors effecting the rate of photosynthesis (6 marks)
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    (Original post by User12399)
    Co2 - Plants need this to for the calvin cycle, the higher the Co2 concentration the more RuBp is turuned into GP which is broken down to TP which produces glucose and other useful organic substances.

    Temp - PS will be directly proportional to the temp, between 0 and 25 the rate doubles for ever 10 increase. After that the PS level evens off and declines as the enzymes start to become denature and do not function properly.

    Light intensity - Light is used in the depended-reaction, the light excites the chlorophyll which excites electrons and goes down ETC to produce ATP. As the light intensity increases more electrons are excited.

    The rate of PS will be limited by the factor that is at its least favorable value.

    Correct?

    Describe the process of the Electron Transport Chain in the production of ATP (6 marks)
    If you're talking bout respiration then.....

    Electrons are transfered down the transport chain through various carrier molecules. each carrier molecule is at a lower energy level than the previous one, so energy is lost from the electrons at these stages. this energy is used to transport protons from the mitochondrial matrix into the intermembrane space of the mitochondria. this creates a proton gradient, so protons move back into the mitochondrial matrix through the enzyme ATP synthase. the energy gained from this is used to combine ADP and and an inorganic phosphate molecule to produce ATP.


    Question: What are the two main types of selection and what do they mean?
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    (Original post by SK-mar)
    If you're talking bout respiration then.....

    Electrons are transfered down the transport chain through various carrier molecules. each carrier molecule is at a lower energy level than the previous one, so energy is lost from the electrons at these stages. this energy is used to transport protons from the mitochondrial matrix into the intermembrane space of the mitochondria. this creates a proton gradient, so protons move back into the mitochondrial matrix through the enzyme ATP synthase. the energy gained from this is used to combine ADP and and an inorganic phosphate molecule to produce ATP.


    Question: What are the two main types of selection and what do they mean?
    Directional: selection may favour individuals that vary in one directional from the mean of the population and changes the characteristics.

    Stabilising: selection favours the average individuals and the the individuals at the 2 extremities eventually die, it preserves characteristics of the population.

    What are nitrification, nitrification and nitrogen fixation important in the nitrogen cycle?
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    (Original post by User12399)
    Directional: selection may favour individuals that vary in one directional from the mean of the population and changes the characteristics.

    Stabilising: selection favours the average individuals and the the individuals at the 2 extremities eventually die, it preserves characteristics of the population.

    What are nitrification, nitrification and nitrogen fixation important in the nitrogen cycle?
    Nitrification is the conversion of ammonium ions to nitrite ions and then nitrate ions through an oxidation reaction, which releases energy. Uses nitrifying bacteria
    Nitrogen fixation is the fixing of nitrogen gas into nitrogen containing compounds. This can occur naturally e.g. lightening. There are two main types of fixing bacteria, mutualistic nitrogen fixing bacteria and free living bacteria. Free living bacteria reduces gaseous nitrogen into ammonia used to make amino acids, mutualistic bacteria live in the nodules of leguminous plants and the plants acquires amino acids from the bacteria and the bacteria obtains carbohydrates from the plant.

    Question: Explain the predator prey cycle
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    (Original post by INeedToRevise)
    Nitrification is the conversion of ammonium ions to nitrite ions and then nitrate ions through an oxidation reaction, which releases energy. Uses nitrifying bacteria
    Nitrogen fixation is the fixing of nitrogen gas into nitrogen containing compounds. This can occur naturally e.g. lightening. There are two main types of fixing bacteria, mutualistic nitrogen fixing bacteria and free living bacteria. Free living bacteria reduces gaseous nitrogen into ammonia used to make amino acids, mutualistic bacteria live in the nodules of leguminous plants and the plants acquires amino acids from the bacteria and the bacteria obtains carbohydrates from the plant.

    Question: Explain the predator prey cycle
    The what cycle? First time I've seen this.
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    (Original post by User12399)
    The what cycle? First time I've seen this.
    Basically the relationship between prey and predators populations. Page 17/18 of NT. It is technically a cycle.
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    Has anybody got the exam report for this paper? thanks.
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    (Original post by ScaRR)
    Has anybody got the exam report for this paper? thanks.
    If it's not on the AQA website(which it isn't, I've checked) then it won't be available to anyone yet.
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    (Original post by INeedToRevise)
    Nitrification is the conversion of ammonium ions to nitrite ions and then nitrate ions through an oxidation reaction, which releases energy. Uses nitrifying bacteria
    Nitrogen fixation is the fixing of nitrogen gas into nitrogen containing compounds. This can occur naturally e.g. lightening. There are two main types of fixing bacteria, mutualistic nitrogen fixing bacteria and free living bacteria. Free living bacteria reduces gaseous nitrogen into ammonia used to make amino acids, mutualistic bacteria live in the nodules of leguminous plants and the plants acquires amino acids from the bacteria and the bacteria obtains carbohydrates from the plant.

    Question: Explain the predator prey cycle
    When predators eat their prey, it reduces the size of the prey population.
    The predators are therefore in more intraspecific competition with each other for the fewer prey that are left.
    As a result, the predator population becomes reduced as some predators aren't able to obtain prey for survival.
    With fewer predators left, fewer prey are eaten; the prey population in turn increases.
    With more prey available, there is therefore more food - so the predator population increases again.
 
 
 
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