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AQA BIOL5 Biology Unit 5 Exam - 22nd June 2011 watch

  • View Poll Results: Are you resitting this unit?
    YES!
    12.91%
    NO!
    87.09%

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    how are most people studying for this exam with only 1 past paper to use? I only have Nelson Thorne tb.
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    (Original post by Nat1986)
    how are most people studying for this exam with only 1 past paper to use? I only have Nelson Thorne tb.
    i also use the nelson thornes textbook and the cgp revision book which i think is quite good
    i hate the fact that there is only one paper the june 10 one
    and knowing aqa they cud ask just about anything
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    hey guys apparently the unit 4 resit was an ok exam with less hsw questions
    hoping the unit 5 is like that aswel
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    can anyoone explain restriction mapping to me in detail..i really dont understand
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    (Original post by Jin3011)
    Yeah I was thinking the same. AQA just love their random animals though, so I think we should expect to see a female african spotted cane toad and others alike.
    Congrats on your Liverpool offer btw =]
    Would you mind if I asked you what GCSE's you got, because its the reason they rejected me.
    Thanks!
    Lol better look that one up And thank you! sorry to hear about your rejection - I got 2A* 6A 1B (counting the top 9 liverpool use) I was surprised I got in anywhere with them lol! Now I just need that A in bio ha. Wbu? Get any offers?
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    (Original post by cza)
    does anyone know where we can get the january 2011 unit 5 paper and mark scheme? i need practice but only one unit 5 paper on the aqa website!!!
    There isnt a jan 2011 paper for unit 5, unit 5 is only done in June
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    (Original post by Nat1986)
    how are most people studying for this exam with only 1 past paper to use? I only have Nelson Thorne tb.
    My teacher made a booklet for my class with all questions from past papers on the topics we are studying, she took some question from the other exam boards too
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    I have no idea how to revise for the synoptic essay. Any help? :|
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    Hey. Can anyone explain restriction mapping to me? The book doesn't seem to explain it very well! Thanks x
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    (Original post by tehsponge)
    I have no idea how to revise for the synoptic essay. Any help? :|
    Plan plan plan. Planning is definitely the key to writing a good essay. Find an essay title, write a plan for as much as you can think of (set yourself a 5 minute time limit, that's what you should spent in the exam). Then, if you've got enough points try and write the essay itself, that's good practice (you want to have done a few before going into the exam. Ensure that all of your points aren't from the same topic, they like to see breadth of knowledge as well as depth- for example, if you were asked 'Why do offspring with the same parents not always share the same characteristics?' of course inheritance is a good place to start, but also talk about the different types of mutations (non-sense,mis-sense,deletion and silent mutations) and what causes them. You could talk about how independent segregation and crossing-over increase genetic diversity etc. Always refer back to the question, why do mutations result in different characteristics? If you get stuck on a question, read around the subject from the textbooks and look on the internet. Using material 'beyond A Level', i.e. you've bothered to find information on topics from elsewhere than the text book will get you extra merit.

    I wouldn't revise as such, just plan a lot of essays and use that as a starting point to identify topics you're a bit rusty on.

    Here are some possible titles for you:

    1-How the structure of cells is related to their function.
    2-The structure and function of carbohydrates.
    3-The Biological importance of water.
    4-The ways in which different species of organisms differ from each other.
    5-Describe how the structure of different polymers are related to their function.
    6-Why offspring produced by the same parents are different in appearance.
    7-The importance of hydrogen bonds in living organisms.
    8-The movement of substances within living organisms.
    9-How the structure of proteins is related to their function.
    10-The process of osmosis and its importance to living organisms.
    11-Inorganic ions include sodium, phosphorus and hydrogen. Describe how these and other inorganic ions are used in living organisms.
    12-The causes of disease in living organisms.
    13-The role of the cell surface membrane in living organisms.
    14-How bacteria affects humans.
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    hey guys
    in germ line gene therapy, the gene is inserted into an fertilized egg cell and is allowed to develop into an embryo, and the embryo is implanted back into the organism. Does this mean that the organism that the embryo has been implanted into has the corrected gene now and is able to pass onto offspring? or does it mean that the embryo, once it develops into an individual, has corrected gene and can pass onto offspring?
    which one of the two is right?
    because i am confused
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    (Original post by Flux_Pav)
    hey guys
    in germ line gene therapy, the gene is inserted into an fertilized egg cell and is allowed to develop into an embryo, and the embryo is implanted back into the organism. Does this mean that the organism that the embryo has been implanted into has the corrected gene now and is able to pass onto offspring? or does it mean that the embryo, once it develops into an individual, has corrected gene and can pass onto offspring?
    which one of the two is right?
    because i am confused
    I beleive it's only the offspring will express the correct gene because the gene is not present in any the maternal organisms bodily cells.
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    hey all
    I'm now getting so nervous for this exam! the dna tecnology stuff is really hard....and there's so much to remember, plus the synoptic essay. I've got only about 11 essays to go till next week, which year is the dna essay from? also if you learn extra stuff this is the edge of getting a few more marks on the essay. so what extra stuff are ppl learning for the essay? cos there's a heck of a lot to learn already without this extra
    Plus i'm learning all the synoptic stuff, not just the main bits cos last year microscopes came up and that was from bio 1! so they cud literally ask you anything from 1st or 2nd year :eek:
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    i have over 20 essays and analysis on them if anyone wants i can email it to them
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    (Original post by Pixiefairy)
    i have over 20 essays and analysis on them if anyone wants i can email it to them
    That would be very kind of you.
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    (Original post by AboutAn8orA9)
    That would be very kind of you.
    pm me your email adress, i don't know how to upload the file onto here
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    pixiefairy-could u send them to me please?
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    (Original post by whiskeyinthejar)
    Plan plan plan. Planning is definitely the key to writing a good essay. Find an essay title, write a plan for as much as you can think of (set yourself a 5 minute time limit, that's what you should spent in the exam). Then, if you've got enough points try and write the essay itself, that's good practice (you want to have done a few before going into the exam. Ensure that all of your points aren't from the same topic, they like to see breadth of knowledge as well as depth- for example, if you were asked 'Why do offspring with the same parents not always share the same characteristics?' of course inheritance is a good place to start, but also talk about the different types of mutations (non-sense,mis-sense,deletion and silent mutations) and what causes them. You could talk about how independent segregation and crossing-over increase genetic diversity etc. Always refer back to the question, why do mutations result in different characteristics? If you get stuck on a question, read around the subject from the textbooks and look on the internet. Using material 'beyond A Level', i.e. you've bothered to find information on topics from elsewhere than the text book will get you extra merit.

    I wouldn't revise as such, just plan a lot of essays and use that as a starting point to identify topics you're a bit rusty on.

    Here are some possible titles for you:

    1-How the structure of cells is related to their function.
    2-The structure and function of carbohydrates.
    3-The Biological importance of water.
    4-The ways in which different species of organisms differ from each other.
    5-Describe how the structure of different polymers are related to their function.
    6-Why offspring produced by the same parents are different in appearance.
    7-The importance of hydrogen bonds in living organisms.
    8-The movement of substances within living organisms.
    9-How the structure of proteins is related to their function.
    10-The process of osmosis and its importance to living organisms.
    11-Inorganic ions include sodium, phosphorus and hydrogen. Describe how these and other inorganic ions are used in living organisms.
    12-The causes of disease in living organisms.
    13-The role of the cell surface membrane in living organisms.
    14-How bacteria affects humans.
    Some of those titles are just :eek: to me. I've done one on biological cycles and the effect of CO2 on living organisms, they were easy, but some of those look horrifying. I better get started
    How am I meant to mark them though?
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    (Original post by Jin3011)
    I beleive it's only the offspring will express the correct gene because the gene is not present in any the maternal organisms bodily cells.
    Exactly what I was thinking. I hope it's right LOL
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    (Original post by whiskeyinthejar)
    Plan plan plan. Planning is definitely the key to writing a good essay. Find an essay title, write a plan for as much as you can think of (set yourself a 5 minute time limit, that's what you should spent in the exam). Then, if you've got enough points try and write the essay itself, that's good practice (you want to have done a few before going into the exam. Ensure that all of your points aren't from the same topic, they like to see breadth of knowledge as well as depth- for example, if you were asked 'Why do offspring with the same parents not always share the same characteristics?' of course inheritance is a good place to start, but also talk about the different types of mutations (non-sense,mis-sense,deletion and silent mutations) and what causes them. You could talk about how independent segregation and crossing-over increase genetic diversity etc. Always refer back to the question, why do mutations result in different characteristics? If you get stuck on a question, read around the subject from the textbooks and look on the internet. Using material 'beyond A Level', i.e. you've bothered to find information on topics from elsewhere than the text book will get you extra merit.

    I wouldn't revise as such, just plan a lot of essays and use that as a starting point to identify topics you're a bit rusty on.

    Here are some possible titles for you:

    1-How the structure of cells is related to their function.
    2-The structure and function of carbohydrates.
    3-The Biological importance of water.
    4-The ways in which different species of organisms differ from each other.
    5-Describe how the structure of different polymers are related to their function.
    6-Why offspring produced by the same parents are different in appearance.
    7-The importance of hydrogen bonds in living organisms.
    8-The movement of substances within living organisms.
    9-How the structure of proteins is related to their function.
    10-The process of osmosis and its importance to living organisms.
    11-Inorganic ions include sodium, phosphorus and hydrogen. Describe how these and other inorganic ions are used in living organisms.
    12-The causes of disease in living organisms.
    13-The role of the cell surface membrane in living organisms.
    14-How bacteria affects humans.
    are there any plans for these essays?
    it would be great
 
 
 
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