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AQA BIOL5 Biology Unit 5 Exam - 22nd June 2011 watch

  • View Poll Results: Are you resitting this unit?
    YES!
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    I can't think about the essay, the list of things that could come up that I couldn't even begin to formulate a response to is daunting to say the least... I'm just praying that proteins / enzymes / carbon or CO2 come up, the only things I can actually answer. It's basically losing a quarter of the marks of the paper if it's a bad topic...

    For revision I'm basically learning bits from the AS course and BIOL4 syllabus (the January one) so that if anything comes up that was mentioned in the textbooks I'll be able to say something, but I'm pretty much hoping to ace the questions to make up for a horrendous essay. Good luck to you guys ^^
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    (Original post by Destroyviruses)
    i made a mindmap , want it?
    Yes please
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    i always see things as seperate processes that dont overlap which is stupid reli cus ibiology is about overlapping concepts
    I think once you begin to see the way things relate to each other, this unit becomes a lot easier to understand, and it will be a lot easier in the essay. I find that making mind maps really helps with this.
    I was thinking that to practise this, I would go through some past essay questions and practise some mind-map planning of them. Then I'll know where the gaps in my knowledge are as well.
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    (Original post by sophieyay)
    Are any of you guys revising anything that's not in the syllabus for the essay? My teacher said that it's the only way you can get top marks in the essay, and whilst I'm not aiming that high, a few extra marks would be nice.
    I have no idea where to start though. Because we don't know what the essay is going to be about, are we just supposed to learn about everything in whole entire spectrum of biology on the off-chance it will be relevant? XD
    hi this is not true at all
    if you include many points which are broad (ie inc plants / animals etc) in sufficient depth as in the textbooks you can potentially get 25 marks.
    we were shown previous 25 mark essays and most had nothing we hadnt learnt in them so dont worry
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    ahh does any one else need a really high mark in this to get an A overall?
    SOO SCARED!
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    (Original post by choc1234)
    hi this is not true at all
    if you include many points which are broad (ie inc plants / animals etc) in sufficient depth as in the textbooks you can potentially get 25 marks.
    we were shown previous 25 mark essays and most had nothing we hadnt learnt in them so dont worry
    Oh! Thank you so much, you've really set my mind at ease XD
    That's really good, because it would be so much of a better idea to learn the syllabus completely thoroughly than to waste precious time revising things that aren't on it! Thanks again.
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    (Original post by sophieyay)
    I think once you begin to see the way things relate to each other, this unit becomes a lot easier to understand, and it will be a lot easier in the essay. I find that making mind maps really helps with this.
    I was thinking that to practise this, I would go through some past essay questions and practise some mind-map planning of them. Then I'll know where the gaps in my knowledge are as well.
    thankyou i basically have went over most of the response stuff
    i think ive linked it together by saying that homeostasis, reflexes, taxes and kinesis all involve responses of the body to move it away from a harmful environment in order to be at a norm, and improve survival chances, so
    the nervous system, hormonal system are intergrated systems, nervous sytem enabling muscle contraction to respond to mainly external stimuli, hormonal system releasing chemical to respond mainly to internal stimuli, and these method of cooridnation enable efficient reponses to be carried out, the more complex an organism the more integrated they are,

    the main difference with homeostasis is that its response is by negative feedback and is a system that integrates both the hormonal and nervous system to different degrees in order to achieve a balance.`
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    (Original post by alicetalbot)
    Yes please
    Its missing a few stuff but most of its on there. I'd reccomend going through the specs and adding stuff onyourself.

    And it's my pleasure to help your welcome.
    Attached Files
  1. File Type: docx mindmap 2.docx (31.8 KB, 124 views)
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    I understand the process that takes place when co2 levels rise above normal e.g chemoreceptors detect and send impulses to medulla oblongata, that then sends impulses via sympathetic nerves to SAN.

    But what happens when CO2 levels fall below normal?
    does this involve parasympathetic nerves?
    if so, someone describe how heart rate is decreased please
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    Urgh.......BIOL5.

    Anyway, I have a couple of questions that I'd be grateful to anyone if they could answer. I was revising diabetes and its control last night and it says in the textbook that the treatment of Type II diabetes can be supplemented by injections of insulin or by the use of drugs that stimulate insulin production, but how would either of those treatments works when this type of diabetes is caused by a loss of responsiveness of glycoprotein receptors to insulin, unless they inject it directly into the cells?

    Also, this is probably an obvious question, but how does obesity and poor diet lead to the onset of Type II diabetes?
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    (Original post by Destroyviruses)
    i made a mindmap , want it?
    yes please, that would b really good thanks!
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    (Original post by Introverted moron)
    Urgh.......BIOL5.

    Anyway, I have a couple of questions that I'd be grateful to anyone if they could answer. I was revising diabetes and its control last night and it says in the textbook that the treatment of Type II diabetes can be supplemented by injections of insulin or by the use of drugs that stimulate insulin production, but how would either of those treatments works when this type of diabetes is caused by a loss of responsiveness of glycoprotein receptors to insulin, unless they inject it directly into the cells?

    Also, this is probably an obvious question, but how does obesity and poor diet lead to the onset of Type II diabetes?
    Hey
    Hmm good question, maybe it is because not ALL the receptors lose responsiveness but fewer than healthy people...
    and the second question, take a look at this website http://www.mcvitamins.com/diabetes.html it says in obesity less and less insulin is able to reach the receptors/insulin -responsive muscles, so there is not enough to meet demand.
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    (Original post by choc1234)
    hi this is not true at all
    if you include many points which are broad (ie inc plants / animals etc) in sufficient depth as in the textbooks you can potentially get 25 marks.
    we were shown previous 25 mark essays and most had nothing we hadnt learnt in them so dont worry
    Mark scheme states for 16 marks in Scientific Content: '...blah blah blah fully in keeping with a programme of A-Level study. In addition, there are some significant references to material which indicates greater depth or breadth of study'

    Which I would interpret as knowledge gained from external sources such as reading biology magazines etc.
    What do people think?
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    Hey guys, finished my Psych exam today so I've got 5 days to focus on biology! I'm feeling pretty confident, I know the basic details, so I'm just gonna use the next 5 days to really bring those up to scratch.

    One section I'm pretty worried about is the essay, I've not been following this thread... So would anybody be so kind as to point me towards the most useful information or tips that have come up?

    Thanks very much!
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    (Original post by Flux_Pav)
    I understand the process that takes place when co2 levels rise above normal e.g chemoreceptors detect and send impulses to medulla oblongata, that then sends impulses via sympathetic nerves to SAN.

    But what happens when CO2 levels fall below normal?
    does this involve parasympathetic nerves?
    if so, someone describe how heart rate is decreased please
    yes this involves the parasympathetic system (although i'm not sure when co2 levels will fall below normal in the real world? as increased metabolic ativity means more co2, so when there is very metaboli activity or muscular activity im guessing co2 level will fall?) but yh in logical terms im sure the process is the complete reverse of the above, where chemorecptors detect the decrease send this to the medulla oblongatat which then decreases the frequency of impulses via the sinoatrial node which decreases the heart rate which leads to less co2 being removed and so the ph in th blood returns to normal, hence the ph lowers to normal and the chemorecptors which detect ph change then reduced impulses frequency and to the mo and this redcues the frequency to the san which increases heart rate back to normal

    control of heart rate is an example of negative feedback and is in some aspect slighlty realted to homeostais whereby the co2 level and 02 levels are controlled as a result of ph homeostatic control
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    (Original post by Jing_jing)
    the blood pH returns to the preset level, so it's homeostasis of blood pH.
    I think with the control of heart rate, its best not to link it with homeostasis cause less CO2 doesn't lead to the blood being alkaline (in homeostasis the change can go in both directions)

    My personal opinion would be to not link the two. Control of heart is studied to realise the importance of receptors.
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    What are all the atagonistic things in bio5?
    I know glucagon and insulin is one
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    (Original post by aj2010)
    What are all the atagonistic things in bio5?
    I know glucagon and insulin is one
    Para- and -sympathetic nervous systems are also antagonistic. Muscles also work as antagonistic pairs, can't think what else.
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    (Original post by aj2010)
    What are all the atagonistic things in bio5?
    I know glucagon and insulin is one
    (Original post by Seasick Steve)
    Para- and -sympathetic nervous systems are also antagonistic. Muscles also work as antagonistic pairs, can't think what else.
    All homeostatic systems surely?
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    Can somebody please explain transcription factors to me?
 
 
 
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