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AQA BIOL5 Biology Unit 5 Exam - 22nd June 2011 Watch

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    (Original post by Organ)
    yeah - as far as I am aware - the start codon alone doesn't begin transcription - a variety of initiation factors do, the three stop codons alone do stop transcription. Stop/start codons will be fine for a-level I bet.

    what I'm not 100% sure about is the DNA helicase - does it simply unzip the bit inbetween the stop and start codons and then rna polymerase moves down the unzipped bit of the strand, and it closes behind the rna polymerase?
    The DNA polymerase follows behind the RNA polymerase I think, rejoining the DNA helix as the RNA nucleotides line up to produce the pre-mRNA strand.

    Only 12 base pairs on the DNA are exposed at any one time.
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    hey have I missed remark deadline?
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    Is everyone using the Nelson Thornes textbook to revise/make notes for this exam?
    We have been told to use different sources- I don't see how that helps in this exam where you are tested mainly on HSW.
    And the Nelson Thornes textbook is aligned to the specification/endorsed by AQA. I plan on just using that and past paper questions.

    Is that a bad idea?
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    (Original post by INeedToRevise)
    Is everyone using the Nelson Thornes textbook to revise/make notes for this exam?
    We have been told to use different sources- I don't see how that helps in this exam where you are tested mainly on HSW.
    And the Nelson Thornes textbook is aligned to the specification/endorsed by AQA. I plan on just using that and past paper questions.

    Is that a bad idea?
    No, I think using the Nelson Thornes textbook and doing the questions and stuff from that seems like a sensible plan... that way you know you're not stressing yourself out trying to learn stuff that turns out not even being a part of your syllabus. The only part I would say using other sources comes in useful is for the synoptic essay, where you actually get marks for making relevant points that are outside the syllabus. In this case it might be useful getting a revision guide that is not for the AQA syllabus, or I found Philip Allan's Biological Sciences Review to be really useful for getting examples and a little extra info.
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    (Original post by Calimboness)
    No, I think using the Nelson Thornes textbook and doing the questions and stuff from that seems like a sensible plan... that way you know you're not stressing yourself out trying to learn stuff that turns out not even being a part of your syllabus. The only part I would say using other sources comes in useful is for the synoptic essay, where you actually get marks for making relevant points that are outside the syllabus. In this case it might be useful getting a revision guide that is not for the AQA syllabus, or I found Philip Allan's Biological Sciences Review to be really useful for getting examples and a little extra info.
    Thanks for that. I shall check out the Phillip Alan review- Think we have a copy at school.
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    (Original post by cobra2k10)
    Hiya fellow biologists !! Below are a few past synoptic essay titles that have been asked:

    • Carbon dioxide may affect organisms directly or indirectly. Describe and explain these effects.
    • The causes of disease in humans.
    • The part played by the movement of substances across cell membranes in the functioning of different organs and organ systems.
    • The part played by enzymes in the functioning of different cells, tissues and organs.
    • Movements inside cells.
    • Transfers through ecosystems.
    • The transfer of substances containing carbon between organisms
    • Cells are easy to distinguish by their shape. How are the shapes of cells related to their function?
    • The transfer of substances containing carbon between organisms and between organisms and the environment.
    • Humans and microorganisms.
    • The biological importance of plants to humans.
    • The importance of hydrogen bonds in living organisms.
    • How nitrogen-containing substances are made available to and are used by living organisms.
    • Carbon dioxide in organisms and ecosystems
    • Why offspring produced by the same parents are different in appearance
    • Polymers have different structures. They also have different functions. Describe how the structures of different polymers are related to their nctions.
    • Describe how nitrogen-containing substances are taken into, and metabolised in, animals and plants.
    • Heat and many different substances are transferred within the body and between the body and the environment. Explain how surface area is linked to this transfer.
    • Inorganic ions include those of sodium, phosphorus and hydrogen. Describe how these and other inorganic ions are used in living organisms.
    • Bacteria affect the lives of humans and other organisms in many ways. Apart from causing disease, describe how bacteria may affect the lives of humans and other organisms.
    • Negative feedback in living organisms.
    • Mean temperatures are rising in many parts of the world. The rising temperatures may result in physiological and ecological effects on living organisms. Describe and explain these effects.
    • The transfer of energy between different organisms and between these organisms and their environment.
    • Ways in which different species of organisms differ from each other.
    • The process of osmosis and its importance to living organisms.
    • Energy transfers which take place inside living organisms.
    • How carbon dioxide gets from a respiring cell to the lumen of an alveolus in the lungs.
    • How an amino acid gets from protein in a person’s food to becoming part of a human protein in that person.
    • How the structure of proteins is related to their functions.
    • The causes of variation and its biological importance.
    • The structure and functions of carbohydrates.
    • Cycles in biology.
    • How bacteria affect human lives.
    • The biological importance of water.
    • The movement of substances within living organisms.
    • The different ways in which organisms use ATP.
    • How the structure of cells is related to their function
    .
    thank you!!!! essays = my worst nightmare:mad:

    we've nearly finished everything at my school, although i'm a little bit worried that we've not done enough on the essay:eek:
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    Could someone tell me which old spec papers are relevant for Unit 4 & 5 exams?
    Thanks
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    (Original post by INeedToRevise)
    Could someone tell me which old spec papers are relevant for Unit 4 & 5 exams?
    Thanks
    depends the spec you are doing, whether aqa A or B.
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    (Original post by INeedToRevise)
    Could someone tell me which old spec papers are relevant for Unit 4 & 5 exams?
    Thanks
    Well, Im doing unit 2 AQA B! its gud for Genetic bit in unit 5 ( fingerprinting-..)

    I have no questions about diagnosis and treatment stuff!! drives me mad arghhh
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    (Original post by cobra2k10)
    Hiya fellow biologists !! Below are a few past synoptic essay titles that have been asked:

    • Carbon dioxide may affect organisms directly or indirectly. Describe and explain these effects.
    • The causes of disease in humans.
    • The part played by the movement of substances across cell membranes in the functioning of different organs and organ systems.
    • The part played by enzymes in the functioning of different cells, tissues and organs.
    • Movements inside cells.
    • Transfers through ecosystems.
    • The transfer of substances containing carbon between organisms
    • Cells are easy to distinguish by their shape. How are the shapes of cells related to their function?
    • The transfer of substances containing carbon between organisms and between organisms and the environment.
    • Humans and microorganisms.
    • The biological importance of plants to humans.
    • The importance of hydrogen bonds in living organisms.
    • How nitrogen-containing substances are made available to and are used by living organisms.
    • Carbon dioxide in organisms and ecosystems
    • Why offspring produced by the same parents are different in appearance
    • Polymers have different structures. They also have different functions. Describe how the structures of different polymers are related to their nctions.
    • Describe how nitrogen-containing substances are taken into, and metabolised in, animals and plants.
    • Heat and many different substances are transferred within the body and between the body and the environment. Explain how surface area is linked to this transfer.
    • Inorganic ions include those of sodium, phosphorus and hydrogen. Describe how these and other inorganic ions are used in living organisms.
    • Bacteria affect the lives of humans and other organisms in many ways. Apart from causing disease, describe how bacteria may affect the lives of humans and other organisms.
    • Negative feedback in living organisms.
    • Mean temperatures are rising in many parts of the world. The rising temperatures may result in physiological and ecological effects on living organisms. Describe and explain these effects.
    • The transfer of energy between different organisms and between these organisms and their environment.
    • Ways in which different species of organisms differ from each other.
    • The process of osmosis and its importance to living organisms.
    • Energy transfers which take place inside living organisms.
    • How carbon dioxide gets from a respiring cell to the lumen of an alveolus in the lungs.
    • How an amino acid gets from protein in a person’s food to becoming part of a human protein in that person.
    • How the structure of proteins is related to their functions.
    • The causes of variation and its biological importance.
    • The structure and functions of carbohydrates.
    • Cycles in biology.
    • How bacteria affect human lives.
    • The biological importance of water.
    • The movement of substances within living organisms.
    • The different ways in which organisms use ATP.
    • How the structure of cells is related to their function
    .
    +rep
    Would be so helpful if you post sample answer for it as well..or somebody else maybe!:rolleyes:
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    (Original post by mzK-)
    Yeah but you could bring in the cell cycle & blood pump cycle etc too, it was quite broad when you thought about it. I think its just getting back into essay writing, not even looked at an essay since GCSE! You too and let me know how you're finding it.
    Oh yeah, I hadn't thought of that, the cell cycle would probably be quite a good essay (that was in AS right?). Essays aren't too bad for me, as I do Classics, which = LOTS of essays :eek: It's just fitting it in within the time limit, and also making sure everything I say is relavant, because you get marks knocked off if you include irrelevant stuff :headfire:
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    How long are these essays meant to be? I'm stressing out over them...we haven't even started practicing them.
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    (Original post by tehsponge)
    How long are these essays meant to be? I'm stressing out over them...we haven't even started practicing them.
    We've been advised to spend no more than 40 minutes on the essay. You should include planning in that time (as you can get marks from what you've written in your plan if you run out of time). So there's no real limit, but I know I can write at least two A4 sides in that time, and get a reasonable mark. Because at the end of the day it's quality, not quantity that counts (cliché I know :cool:)
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    (Original post by Calimboness)
    We've been advised to spend no more than 40 minutes on the essay. You should include planning in that time (as you can get marks from what you've written in your plan if you run out of time). So there's no real limit, but I know I can write at least two A4 sides in that time, and get a reasonable mark. Because at the end of the day it's quality, not quantity that counts (cliché I know :cool:)
    Have you revised all of unit 1 and 2 for it? The thought of doing all that again stresses me out so much.
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    (Original post by tehsponge)
    Have you revised all of unit 1 and 2 for it? The thought of doing all that again stresses me out so much.
    I haven't yet, I plan to at least look over my revision resources from AS and see if I can figure out what would make a good essay...although I think in practicing essays from that really long list above, you'll find what would be good things to revise and you'll sort of re-learn things along the way...

    Also, you get a choice of two essays in the exam, I'd imagine one would be more AS based and one more A2 based, so you should be okay, but don't take my word on it!

    How do you revise for biology in general?
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    (Original post by Calimboness)
    I haven't yet, I plan to at least look over my revision resources from AS and see if I can figure out what would make a good essay...although I think in practicing essays from that really long list above, you'll find what would be good things to revise and you'll sort of re-learn things along the way...

    Also, you get a choice of two essays in the exam, I'd imagine one would be more AS based and one more A2 based, so you should be okay, but don't take my word on it!

    How do you revise for biology in general?
    I make notes from the Nelson Thornes textbook, and do all the summary questions. Then I do loads of past paper questions; I have a booklet with all of the old spec questions in it. They help me learn the content, then closer to the exam I'll start new spec questions to get exam technique down.
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    (Original post by tehsponge)
    I make notes from the Nelson Thornes textbook, and do all the summary questions. Then I do loads of past paper questions; I have a booklet with all of the old spec questions in it. They help me learn the content, then closer to the exam I'll start new spec questions to get exam technique down.
    Yeah, that sounds similar to my own methods Well, good luck with it all!
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    (Original post by arvin_infinity)
    +rep
    Would be so helpful if you post sample answer for it as well..or somebody else maybe!:rolleyes:
    i found these on a different website n i think they r realli gud
    Attached Files
  1. File Type: doc Synoptic%20Essay%20Plans[1].doc (33.0 KB, 5276 views)
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    (Original post by clever clogg)
    i found these on a different website n i think they r realli gud
    they're so good. Bang on starting points, thanks for that.

    Does anybody know if we have to cover a certain number of topics or just list a few and talk about them in depth?
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    *subscribes*

    I haven't started my revision for this yet, am concentrating more on my chemistry. I actually really like this unit though, it's a lot better than the last one
 
 
 
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