Turn on thread page Beta

AQA BIOL5 Biology Unit 5 Exam - 22nd June 2011 watch

  • View Poll Results: Are you resitting this unit?
    YES!
    12.91%
    NO!
    87.09%

    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Does anyone know how to answer this title:
    How an amino acid gets from protein in a person's food to becoming part of a human protein in that person...

    I got that the protein is broken down into amino acids and the amino acids are absorbed into the small intestines, I think..but need someone to clarify that the amino acids go into the blood capilliaries from the small intestine and then go to the tissue fluid and bathe the cells? Ultimatley the amino acids need to reach the nucleus and cytoplasm to be translated and transcribed...so when they are in the tissue fluid and absorbed by the cells do they go into the nuclear pores and become transcribed then translated into a protein?? :s
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    has anyone the 4bi and 4dii on p.g 235? For the first one the mark scheme says that G binds to G! How is the possible? Also I don't understand how it is valine in 4bii

    Also q4bii on p.g 245, the last sentence of mark scheme says that transcription is prevented when mRNA is broken down. Isn't it meant to be translation???

    It would be great if someone could explain this to me.
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Mie Peson)
    has anyone the 4bi and 4dii on p.g 235? For the first one the mark scheme says that G binds to G! How is the possible? Also I don't understand how it is valine in 4bii

    Also q4bii on p.g 245, the last sentence of mark scheme says that transcription is prevented when mRNA is broken down. Isn't it meant to be translation???

    It would be great if someone could explain this to me.
    We did those questions in class- there are a few typos in the book, it's not just you!

    On pg 235 qn 4, you'll notice the 2 codes for valine are the same. One should be GUU. On the mrna diagram at the top, the first triplet is GCA not GGA.

    Hope this helps
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Navi_Fairy)
    *Subscribes*

    We've nearly finished, we did the course in a weird order though and have some stuff on neurones and muscle contraction left. We haven't done many of the synoptic essays yet.
    I still haven't taken the biology unit 4 exam either (my college is annoying and insists we must take both exams in june...More stress!)

    me too we did the course the opposite way round
    u applied for pharmacy my firm is bradford
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by student777)
    We did those questions in class- there are a few typos in the book, it's not just you!

    On pg 235 qn 4, you'll notice the 2 codes for valine are the same. One should be GUU. On the mrna diagram at the top, the first triplet is GCA not GGA.

    Hope this helps
    Yeah I worked it out. Thanks for your help though, was really pissed before

    How is your prepration going?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by MrsCrackFox)
    I was going to create a thread on this.
    I think it'll be a good place to post any essay questions you've been given so we can all have a go at some.
    I might also post my essay plans at some point too.

    To be honest, I need the support from you guys! I have 2 of the worst teachers ever, seriously we do not learn a thing. Everyone has had to get tutors but I might not be able to afford one :|
    I found out today we have only covered 3/8 topics! We have 3 weeks left and we haven't even done any practice essay or preparation!
    So yes, I am starting to panic.

    I have a question for you guys, for the essay question how much knowledge do we need to know on the AS content? Does it have to be detailed, because I have a memory like a sieve.
    It would be silly to have to learn everything again and they don't expect you to. But they do expect us to know the major topics that have been popping up over the course such as enzymes, proteins, DNA, ATP and so on. :yep: I thought of grouping all the sub - topics together over the whole of AS and A2 and refer to it when writing essays. After a while I should be able to do it without it. :yep:

    Also cover the content ASAP because it's huge and it takes time to digest it all, as long as you practice essays now there won't be an issue. :hugs:
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Sparkly-Star)
    It would be silly to have to learn everything again and they don't expect you to. But they do expect us to know the major topics that have been popping up over the course such as enzymes, proteins, DNA, ATP and so on. :yep: I thought of grouping all the sub - topics together over the whole of AS and A2 and refer to it when writing essays. After a while I should be able to do it without it. :yep:

    Also cover the content ASAP because it's huge and it takes time to digest it all, as long as you practice essays now there won't be an issue. :hugs:
    Ooh, ok thanks a lot!
    I think I'll just read through the revision manuals and anything that seems to occur quite often or tie in with other sections I'll probably make detailed notes of. I think enzymes has cropped up so much now that the information is permanently embedded in my brain...

    For the essays... do you think it's better to cover fewer topics going into detail, or to cover quite a few topics but just make a few statements and not go into such detail?

    I'm worrying now, especially as my teachers have only covered just over half the content and we only have 1 week of school left! :puppyeyes:
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    I'm sitting this exam too, and I'm not looking forward to the essay
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by MrsCrackFox)
    Ooh, ok thanks a lot!
    I think I'll just read through the revision manuals and anything that seems to occur quite often or tie in with other sections I'll probably make detailed notes of. I think enzymes has cropped up so much now that the information is permanently embedded in my brain...

    For the essays... do you think it's better to cover fewer topics going into detail, or to cover quite a few topics but just make a few statements and not go into such detail?

    I'm worrying now, especially as my teachers have only covered just over half the content and we only have 1 week of school left! :puppyeyes:
    Also I thought of researching some things for each chapter that we have done over the entire course and if it works out I can write about it in the essay... that's what could get us the 14/16 marks.

    I reckon about 4/5 major topics from AS & A2 and trying to squeeze in minor topics if possible, otherwise it would look we are rambling about everything and anything. :p: They expect us to talk about the main things that we have covered to this level, that's what it says in the markscheme (something like that). :p:

    As for the content, which chapters have you done so far? I would urge you to do chapter 10 and 16, especially chapter 16 as it's the hardest! Then you can ask your teacher if you don't get it. :yep: Chapter 9 is okay, 10 is hard but easy once you understand it, 11 is a lot of memory work, 12 is okay, 13 is quite easy, 14 is easy, 15 is easy and 16 is the hardest one! (Using the Nelson Thornes book btw)

    Just know that it is still not too late! :hugs: Prioritise biology. :yep:
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Sparkly-Star)
    Also I thought of researching some things for each chapter that we have done over the entire course and if it works out I can write about it in the essay... that's what could get us the 14/16 marks.

    I reckon about 4/5 major topics from AS & A2 and trying to squeeze in minor topics if possible, otherwise it would look we are rambling about everything and anything. :p: They expect us to talk about the main things that we have covered to this level, that's what it says in the markscheme (something like that). :p:

    As for the content, which chapters have you done so far? I would urge you to do chapter 10 and 16, especially chapter 16 as it's the hardest! Then you can ask your teacher if you don't get it. :yep: Chapter 9 is okay, 10 is hard but easy once you understand it, 11 is a lot of memory work, 12 is okay, 13 is quite easy, 14 is easy, 15 is easy and 16 is the hardest one! (Using the Nelson Thornes book btw)

    Just know that it is still not too late! :hugs: Prioritise biology. :yep:
    I hate chapter 16 so much. Haha.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by INeedToRevise)
    I hate chapter 16 so much. Haha.
    It gives me nightmares! :cry2:
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Sparkly-Star)
    It gives me nightmares! :cry2:
    Lool. 18th August is giving me nightmares already.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    Ive got a question about
    Gene sequencing
    Its well explained in CGP but I only am a bit confused about the differences between electrophoresis on its own and in the Gene sequencing!!

    I mean , in gene sequencing bands are nucleotides whereas in fingerprinting bands are DNA fragments!!

    ANyone shed some light please.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by arvin_infinity)
    Ive got a question about
    Gene sequencing
    Its well explained in CGP but I only am a bit confused about the differences between electrophoresis on its own and in the Gene sequencing!!

    I mean , in gene sequencing bands are nucleotides whereas in fingerprinting bands are DNA fragments!!

    ANyone shed some light please.
    Both involve DNA fragments. With gene sequencing, you use the Sanger method, which is where you have 'terminator nucleotides' which attach to the complementary nucleotide of the DNA strand. This stops anymore nucleotides being attached, so you end up with chunks of DNA.

    DNA fingerprinting also makes DNA fragments, but it uses restriction endonucleases. If you remember from the stuff on in vivo gene cloning, restriction endonucleases cut at a specific recognition site on the DNA strand. So by using this, forensic investigators can compare two samples of DNA from the fingerprint they produce. If the DNA they find at the crime scene is the same as one of their suspects, then the restriction endonuclease will cut at the same point and produce the same fragments.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Mie Peson)
    Yeah I worked it out. Thanks for your help though, was really pissed before

    How is your prepration going?
    Its so annoying when textbooks (and sometimes even exam papers :eek: ) are wrong. Makes you feel really smart when you correct a textbook though :awesome:
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by tehsponge)
    Both involve DNA fragments. With gene sequencing, you use the Sanger method, which is where you have 'terminator nucleotides' which attach to the complementary nucleotide of the DNA strand. This stops anymore nucleotides being attached, so you end up with chunks of DNA.

    DNA fingerprinting also makes DNA fragments, but it uses restriction endonucleases. If you remember from the stuff on in vivo gene cloning, restriction endonucleases cut at a specific recognition site on the DNA strand. So by using this, forensic investigators can compare two samples of DNA from the fingerprint they produce. If the DNA they find at the crime scene is the same as one of their suspects, then the restriction endonuclease will cut at the same point and produce the same fragments.
    Hey

    Could you please explain that which sequence we determine through Sanger method (terminator nucleotides) and gel electrophoresis. Is it the sequence complementary to template DNA or is it the actual sequence of template DNA? My teacher did not explain it clearly

    And yeah the last thing you want to heppen is learn wrong info from errors in the book.

    Thanks again
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Mie Peson)
    Hey

    Could you please explain that which sequence we determine through Sanger method (terminator nucleotides) and gel electrophoresis. Is it the sequence complementary to template DNA or is it the actual sequence of template DNA? My teacher did not explain it clearly

    And yeah the last thing you want to heppen is learn wrong info from errors in the book.

    Thanks again
    In the Sanger method they first split the DNA double helix into two single strands, and then the primer binds with its complementary strand. Then the free nucleotides are added on using DNA polymerase, until a terminator nucleotide attaches and stops anymore nucleotides being added.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by tehsponge)
    Both involve DNA fragments. With gene sequencing, you use the Sanger method, which is where you have 'terminator nucleotides' which attach to the complementary nucleotide of the DNA strand. This stops anymore nucleotides being attached, so you end up with chunks of DNA.

    DNA fingerprinting also makes DNA fragments, but it uses restriction endonucleases. If you remember from the stuff on in vivo gene cloning, restriction endonucleases cut at a specific recognition site on the DNA strand. So by using this, forensic investigators can compare two samples of DNA from the fingerprint they produce. If the DNA they find at the crime scene is the same as one of their suspects, then the restriction endonuclease will cut at the same point and produce the same fragments.
    Im doing AQA and there is no Sanger method! Weve got chain termination method

    instead..dunno if theyre the same :confused: ohh description is the same tho ...

    CGP just doesnt make any sense to me atm..
    Here is CGP example : There is a image of electrophoresis in gene sequencing , in which there is a T nucleotide (Not fragment!!?) at the bottom of the gel near +ve electrode

    Thanks for reply
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by tehsponge)
    In the Sanger method they first split the DNA double helix into two single strands, and then the primer binds with its complementary strand. Then the free nucleotides are added on using DNA polymerase, until a terminator nucleotide attaches and stops anymore nucleotides being added.
    Thanks for your reply. I know how the method works. I'm just confused at the last part where you number the fragments in the rectangular thing for electrophoresis. By assigning them numbers and seeing how much each fragment travels, sequence is determined depending under which base column the fragments are. My question was whether this is the sequence of the original sample DNA or is it the sequence that is complementary to sample DNA. It has to be either one of them as the sequence is only single stranded:confused:
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by arvin_infinity)
    Im doing AQA and there is no Sanger method! Weve got chain termination method

    instead..dunno if theyre the same :confused: ohh description is the same tho ...

    CGP just doesnt make any sense to me atm..
    Here is CGP example : There is a image of electrophoresis in gene sequencing , in which there is a T nucleotide (Not fragment!!?) at the bottom of the gel near +ve electrode

    Thanks for reply

    Im doing AQA too, chain termination is the same as Sanger method, our teacher taught it to us as this as it adds extra information and can be counted towards the two extra marks for scientific knowledge above and beyond A level expected in the essay. i'd research it, it should benefit
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
Updated: June 22, 2016

University open days

  1. University of Bradford
    University-wide Postgraduate
    Wed, 25 Jul '18
  2. University of Buckingham
    Psychology Taster Tutorial Undergraduate
    Wed, 25 Jul '18
  3. Bournemouth University
    Clearing Campus Visit Undergraduate
    Wed, 1 Aug '18
Poll
How are you feeling in the run-up to Results Day 2018?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.