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AQA BIOL5 Biology Unit 5 Exam - 22nd June 2011 watch

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    (Original post by Destroyviruses)
    It does? If so then all my questions are answered!
    -adenoviruses are first made harmful by interefering with a gene involved in their replication
    -they are mixed with epithelial cells and plasmids with the CFTR gene inserted
    -the adenoviruses take up the epithelial cells with these plasmids
    - adenoviruses incorporate the CFTR gene into their genetic material
    - adenoviruses are inhaled through the nostrils

    I think I'm correct. someone please correct me if i'm not
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    (Original post by l4ith)
    If you are talking about the passage of an action potential along an unmyelinated neurone, when it has occurred in one region there will be a large amount of sodium ions that have diffused in to that region. Hence these ions can diffuse along the axon and act as a stimulus for the next region to depolarise; the ions will move in both directions but since the area behind will be refractory an impulse will not be triggered there. As a result the impulse travels in one direction along the whole length of the axon.

    With a myelinated neurone, action potentials only occur at the nodes of Ranvier, where there are gaps in the insulating myelin sheath. When an action potential occurs at these points the large influx of positive ions repels potassium ions down the neurone towards the next node of Ranvier. Again the impulse is only propagated in one direction because the previous node will be refractory.

    Hope that helped
    thanks so much, genius!
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    (Original post by pip91uk)
    I know this has been discussed a little before, but I really can't get my head around kineses. I understand that it is non-directional and effected by the intensity of the stimulus, but I keep reading that in unfavourable conditions, the organism will move more quickly and change direction more often. But surely walking fast in a straight line is more likely to result in finding more favourable conditions? If anyone can find it online, question 1 on the June 06 paper illustrates the point I'm trying to make, the body-louse turns more often at 35 degrees to stay there longer.

    I know it's a minor point that will probably only come up as a one marker, if at all, but it's really annoying me so a quick clarification would be much appreciated
    If you're reading that from the Nelson Thornes textbook, its wrong! If the animal is in a more unpleasant stimulus, it moves more but changes direction less.
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    (Original post by NRican)
    Can anyone ask me some questions on Chapter 16, just learnt it yesterday and I wanna see if anything actually went in my brain

    I will do the same in return on a topic of your choosing if you want.
    Ok, i'll try and make them as AQA-like as possible :P

    Describe PCR
    If I start off with 10 strands of DNA and end up with 2560 strands, how many cycles of PCR did the DNA go through?
    A child has his genetic fingerprint taken. Half of the bands match with the mother. Explain why all of the bands do not match with the mother.
    What are the disadvantages of treating SCID with gene therapy?
    Explain why dna fragments move different distances in gel electropphoresis.

    Would appreciate it if you asked me questions on homeostasis/oestrus cycle
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    guys look at the spec 3.5.7

    'evaluate effect of diagnosis and treatment of disordes caused by hereditary mutations andthose caused by acquired mutations'

    WTF?
    someone help me!
    and direct me to a page on NT that helps me on it please
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    (Original post by Flux_Pav)
    -adenoviruses are first made harmful by interefering with a gene involved in their replication
    -they are mixed with epithelial cells and plasmids with the CFTR gene inserted
    -the adenoviruses take up the epithelial cells with these plasmids
    - adenoviruses incorporate the CFTR gene into their genetic material
    - adenoviruses are inhaled through the nostrils

    I think I'm correct. someone please correct me if i'm not
    Do you know what happens after that?

    I think its all right but I think you made a typo in the beginning, is it meant to say harmless?

    What do you mean the viruses take up the epithetial cellS?
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    How can we prevent eutrophication in watercourses? I know its unit 4 but just worried if it might turn up as this is synoptic paper.
    Thanks
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    What's the difference between totipotent cells and stem cells?
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    (Original post by threerose92)
    How can we prevent eutrophication in watercourses? I know its unit 4 but just worried if it might turn up as this is synoptic paper.
    Thanks
    All I can think of is to use organic fertiliser, and only use the exact amount you need.
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    (Original post by Flux_Pav)
    -adenoviruses are first made harmful by interefering with a gene involved in their replication
    -they are mixed with epithelial cells and plasmids with the CFTR gene inserted
    -the adenoviruses take up the epithelial cells with these plasmids
    - adenoviruses incorporate the CFTR gene into their genetic material
    - adenoviruses are inhaled through the nostrils

    I think I'm correct. someone please correct me if i'm not
    Personally i thought it went
    -adenoviruses made harmless
    -plasmids have CFTR gene incorporated into them
    -adenoviruses then treated to take up plasmids
    -then you inhale them
    -adenoviruses inject CFTR gene into epithelial cells

    Im pretty sure they dont take up the epithelial cells but i could be wrong
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    (Original post by Destroyviruses)
    Do you know what happens after that?

    I think its all right but I think you made a typo in the beginning, is it meant to say harmless?

    What do you mean the viruses take up the epithetial cellS?
    oops yes . epic fail there . it was a typo

    the cells take up the virus*

    other way around- sorry about that

    but i hope i made it as easy as possible though
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    (Original post by Flux_Pav)
    guys look at the spec 3.5.7

    'evaluate effect of diagnosis and treatment of disordes caused by hereditary mutations andthose caused by acquired mutations'

    WTF?
    someone help me!
    and direct me to a page on NT that helps me on it please
    maybe page 242. or 2274-275

    Im abit confused about that two. What it actually means.
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    (Original post by tehsponge)
    If you're reading that from the Nelson Thornes textbook, its wrong! If the animal is in a more unpleasant stimulus, it moves more but changes direction less.
    Thank you I shall go with that more logical answer. Stupid textbook, stupid exam board :mad: Fingers crossed for lowest of the low grade boundaries
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    fml. I haven't even touched synoptic essays yet :\ I done about 5 before study leave....
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    (Original post by Destroyviruses)
    maybe page 242. or 2274-275

    Im abit confused about that two. What it actually means.
    Do you have the CGP book? It has that stuff in it
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    (Original post by Flux_Pav)
    guys look at the spec 3.5.7

    'evaluate effect of diagnosis and treatment of disordes caused by hereditary mutations andthose caused by acquired mutations'

    WTF?
    someone help me!
    and direct me to a page on NT that helps me on it please
    I think that's something along the lines of the fact you can inherit oncogenes, and therefore have an increased risk of cancer. They'll probably ask us it on some random disease we've never heard of though, knowing AQA!
    I think that's in the genetic counselling bit of the book.
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    (Original post by Flux_Pav)
    guys look at the spec 3.5.7

    'evaluate effect of diagnosis and treatment of disordes caused by hereditary mutations andthose caused by acquired mutations'

    WTF?
    someone help me!
    and direct me to a page on NT that helps me on it please
    I think it means gene therapy and genetic screening, if so 262 271
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    (Original post by Flux_Pav)
    oops yes . epic fail there . it was a typo

    the cells take up the virus*

    other way around- sorry about that

    but i hope i made it as easy as possible though
    Thanks.

    But what I want to know is what happens after the virus enters the body cells.
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    Please could someone help explain to me the difference between totipotent cells and stem cells. Aren't both unspecialised?
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    for an essay question on the importance of negative and positive feedback, what can be included from unit 1, 2 and 4?
 
 
 
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