Turn on thread page Beta
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    English and French are fine for A level choices. You should read this booklet

    http://www.russellgroup.ac.uk/informed-choices/

    Although it is published by only one group of univerities and may not be entitrely accepted by all universities, it provides a very good introduction.

    You will need a balance in your university choices because some places won't give you offers even though you are expected to meet their standard requirement and because not everyone meets their offer. There is no reason why you shouldn't include Brookes as one of your choices.

    My advice would be that you go on open days (or just visit) a number of places before choosing your choices. Aberystwyth, Manchester, Reading and London are very different places.

    And follow TSR over the next year or so as other people in your position explore the same issues as you do.

    It is for you, and not anyone around you, and certainly not me to tell you where to go. I have ended up at as a part-time mature post-graduate student at a university that I never thought about as an undergraduate in a place which I would certainly not wish to live in for three weeks let alone 3 years!
    Very helpful, thank you I appreciate it.

    Since business is stated as less favored, I am wondering what third subject I should choose that will be considered good.

    But I will do as you say very kind of you.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by d.luffy)
    Very helpful, thank you I appreciate it.

    Since business is stated as less favored, I am wondering what third subject I should choose that will be considered good.

    But I will do as you say very kind of you.
    History is always a pretty good bet for a law degree, as is politics, geography, maths, any of the sciences..though, I took psychology, english, sociology and drama (so only one 'hard' subject) and managed to get into Oxford so there is a lot more to it than simply subject choice. You should also think about why you want to STUDY law, not why you want to be a lawyer, as this is what the university is interested in. You should also make sure that your extra-curricular is varied.

    You should really pick subjects you think you will be good at (but definitely try and avoid any 'studies', e.g. business or media) and focus on getting the right grades..if you have a balanced enough application then you should be fine

    I agree with nulli tertius, it is way too early to decide if you want to be a barrister or solicitor...though if you are considering either it is quite important to at least achieve an AAB at A-Level, as most places have top grades as a pre-requisite for a training contract/pupillage.
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by cros)
    History is always a pretty good bet for a law degree, as is politics, geography, maths, any of the sciences..though, I took psychology, english, sociology and drama (so only one 'hard' subject) and managed to get into Oxford so there is a lot more to it than simply subject choice. You should also think about why you want to STUDY law, not why you want to be a lawyer, as this is what the university is interested in. You should also make sure that your extra-curricular is varied.

    You should really pick subjects you think you will be good at (but definitely try and avoid any 'studies', e.g. business or media) and focus on getting the right grades..if you have a balanced enough application then you should be fine

    I agree with nulli tertius, it is way too early to decide if you want to be a barrister or solicitor...though if you are considering either it is quite important to at least achieve an AAB at A-Level, as most places have top grades as a pre-requisite for a training contract/pupillage.
    Yes you got point about why I want to study law, instead of thinking of why wanting to become a lawyer, but it doesn't really differ, Law is all about learning the world of politics...etc

    Damn, with those subjects you managed to get to Oxford? It is surprising, I guess I would go for something else then, though what was your gradeS?

    I was thinking about sociology if I should take it or not, as my friend said it is worth it, he got an A in that subject and it was easy or something maybe I will go for that, since I will need the A's to be able to get in a good university maybe like oxford or something.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Sungirlshines)
    applying to extetr for law? Got a conditional already..but i guess toelf or ielts is a pain in the arse, cos thats what they want fro me now. Meeh
    Sussex= Kent when it comes to law? I thought Kent is better from what i heard and from what i researched myself?
    kent is actually falling in it rep as a law school, unfortunately after making a second campus in canterbury they did not split their resources to well and has not paid off in terms of teaching and resources
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by LostInLaw)
    Mm, I remember speaking to my preferred firm during 2nd year and asking what their opinions were on postgrad, as I was considering a certain course out of pure academic interest. It was made pretty clear it would add little, if anything to my application, certainly wouldn't atone for any other weaknesses and I had to be prepared to justify why I'd put off practice for another year. Eventually opted not to do because I was too worried that it would end up being detrimental to my application!
    At this firm did you ask about their preferences on Universities?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by d.luffy)
    Yes you got point about why I want to study law, instead of thinking of why wanting to become a lawyer, but it doesn't really differ, Law is all about learning the world of politics...etc

    Damn, with those subjects you managed to get to Oxford? It is surprising, I guess I would go for something else then, though what was your gradeS?

    I was thinking about sociology if I should take it or not, as my friend said it is worth it, he got an A in that subject and it was easy or something maybe I will go for that, since I will need the A's to be able to get in a good university maybe like oxford or something.
    I had 3 A's and 2 B's (including a lot of 100% marks in modules), plus a really good LNAT score, extra-curricular and (based on the weight Oxford give to interviews) I suppose I interview quite well. I wouldn't take me as a common example, the other seven in my college took subjects like Chemistry, Maths, History etc. You have to show very strong academic potential if you choose the 'softer' subjects, particularly for Oxbridge and the Russell Group and any less than 3 A's will not (generally) get you a place.

    Sociology was incredibly easy for me and most of my friends, but some of the other students did struggle. I'd say it's pretty hard not to get an A in your AS sociology (I basically did hardly any work and still managed lol). Essentially, for any Law course the competition will be very high and you need to be a real 'all-rounder' for Uni and for your career when you leave.

    Just as a point about why you want to study law, the 'politics' side of things doesn't arise that often (in a strict sense) - you might want to do some research into the particular courses of each university, as they do differ quite a bit.

    Finally, this is really not meant to sound rude/insulting etc and it may be simply that you are not thinking about it because you're on a forum, but your English (i.e. grammar) will need to be a lot clearer if you intend to take a law course. They are incredibly strict on clear, concise and pretty much perfect English. That may be something you want to consider, particularly when writing your personal statement etc.

    PM me if you would like any help re Oxford specifically or Law as a degree/profession (solicitor only - I don't know much about the bar tbh).
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by candii)
    At this firm did you ask about their preferences on Universities?
    I can answer for the majority of firms, if you ask specifically they will say they recruit from any university. Based on statistics (and the effort law firms put into marketing) it is significantly more difficult to get a vac scheme/training contract from a non top 20 (conventional) uni.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by hmaus)
    Aber is not a Scottish university - it is in Wales!
    You must be thinking of Aberystwyth University but 'lionboy' was obviously referring to The University of Aberdeen which is in Scotland (and in Aberdeen funnily enough)
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by kingh-singh)
    You must be thinking of Aberystwyth University but 'lionboy' was obviously referring to The University of Aberdeen which is in Scotland (and in Aberdeen funnily enough)
    Ok sorry! IME when people say Aber they usually mean Aberystwyth and when they mean Aberdeen they just say Aberdeen as it is not really long enough to need shortening but fine, I stand corrected
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by hmaus)
    Ok sorry! IME when people say Aber they usually mean Aberystwyth and when they mean Aberdeen they just say Aberdeen as it is not really long enough to need shortening but fine, I stand corrected
    I don't think it is the length. It is getting those "y"s in the right place.
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by cros)
    I had 3 A's and 2 B's (including a lot of 100% marks in modules), plus a really good LNAT score, extra-curricular and (based on the weight Oxford give to interviews) I suppose I interview quite well. I wouldn't take me as a common example, the other seven in my college took subjects like Chemistry, Maths, History etc. You have to show very strong academic potential if you choose the 'softer' subjects, particularly for Oxbridge and the Russell Group and any less than 3 A's will not (generally) get you a place.

    Sociology was incredibly easy for me and most of my friends, but some of the other students did struggle. I'd say it's pretty hard not to get an A in your AS sociology (I basically did hardly any work and still managed lol). Essentially, for any Law course the competition will be very high and you need to be a real 'all-rounder' for Uni and for your career when you leave.

    Just as a point about why you want to study law, the 'politics' side of things doesn't arise that often (in a strict sense) - you might want to do some research into the particular courses of each university, as they do differ quite a bit.

    Finally, this is really not meant to sound rude/insulting etc and it may be simply that you are not thinking about it because you're on a forum, but your English (i.e. grammar) will need to be a lot clearer if you intend to take a law course. They are incredibly strict on clear, concise and pretty much perfect English. That may be something you want to consider, particularly when writing your personal statement etc.

    PM me if you would like any help re Oxford specifically or Law as a degree/profession (solicitor only - I don't know much about the bar tbh).
    I agree with you, my english needs more work out, that is why I tend to take english A level, since it will help me alot.

    I understand, but I already got 2 subjects on my head the 3rd one will be sociology, which means I will mostly be a thought as multilingual student, in interviews I give good interviews too, which the judge will like, but I am not really concerned about that, and you did LNAT A levels...etc which shows you really give it all you got to be in that university, well, for me I will only do A levels and I am not going further then that, I want to get to university in september 2012, since I will be taking a one year intensive course A level.

    But let's talk this in a private chat.

    Ill tell you details in there

    Thanks everybody for help.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I know Scottish universities have been mentioned, but for Irish, how would Trinity College Dublin (LLB) compare?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ruggerbugger)
    I know Scottish universities have been mentioned, but for Irish, how would Trinity College Dublin (LLB) compare?
    It's very good isn't it? I know a girl who studied there and then she worked in an MC firm so I don't think it is a uni to hold you back
    Offline

    15
    (Original post by hmaus)
    Aber is not a Scottish university - it is in Wales!
    (Original post by Vinchenko)
    I'm assuming the poster meant the other Aber - Abertay Dundee
    Pretty sure he meant Aberdeen as opposed to Aber or Abertay.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ruggerbugger)
    I know Scottish universities have been mentioned, but for Irish, how would Trinity College Dublin (LLB) compare?
    Its meant to be Irelands equivalant to oxbridge, if you get it then def consider it but i dont think it qualifies you to do law in the UK??? If its a uni in ireland you want tht qualifies, the best bet is queens uni belfast, however the llb program is strong yet its insanely competitve as the only sensible option other than this is Ulster which is kind of poor...so there is an excessive num of apps. . TCB is def worth going if you have an offer tho
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by violenti)
    I have to say to suggest that an employer will probably choose an oxbridge law graduate over one from UCL or similar, is on any construction utter nonsense!
    If this is the case, why are tenants of ten years call or less at the top-tier sets primarily or exclusively Oxford and Cambridge graduates?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by violenti)
    I have to say to suggest that an employer will probably choose an oxbridge law graduate over one from UCL or similar, is on any construction utter nonsense! How do I know this? well firstly my aunty is a Q.C in a top set of chambers where she sits on the pupillage panel: she is an LSE graduate, ans secondly my father is a senior M.D at a bulge bracket investment bank: he read PPE at pembroke College Oxford

    Now remember all law degrees, that is to say qualifying law degrees are ratified and monitored by the SRA, and the Bar Council, so as to ensure the content of the core subjects is the same , as is the marking and classifications of degrees to ensure consistency and same knowledge levels pound for pound across all universities. So a first from oxford is no better or worse than a first from say UCL ETC.

    I do accept that at Oxford one does have to do an essay every week or so. That in itself does not mean that candidate is better for it. The reality is that has the way oxford has always done it, and they continue to do so. It is that and only that, which seperates Oxford from from the rest in teaching methodology. More does not mean neccesarily MORE!.

    I read Law at KCL, and got a first, I ask anyone to suggest that an employer considers my first to be less than that from Oxford.Because I didnt do an esay a week , no less equips with me with the knowledge base. Besides how does an Oxon graduate not know that I didnt do more reading than them in my spare time over and above that which is required?

    The last point that the Law firms /Banks and Chambers spend more at Oxford is rubbish. How do I know that? When I came to Bristol last year to do my Masters, I was amazed almost to the point of embarrasment just how much the Law firms and banks spend/sponsor the law club, and balls and social events to the point of it being embarrasing! My housemate will vouch for that, he graduated from Cantab last year.

    Bristol law Club is the envy of the WHOLE University, to the point that friends from other departments join our sponsored bar crawls, sponsored balls, sponsored quizzes, and even private dinners. There are weekly events that cost the firms and banks thousans each week(no exageration). By way of example DLA, took 250 Bristol law freshers away to Alton towers, where they paid for all the rides, hotels, entrance fees, coaches,and an entire limitless free bar. That speaks volumes does it not!? If Bristol wasnt ranked amongst the very elite law departments, they simply would not go to such time and expense surely?This is not an isolated incident, it is one of many I can refer you to.

    As for presentations yes they are given on masse, but equally the partners hire out private tables to speak with small groups of people , ranging from 8 to 0 at a time. So the idea that private small dining is the preserve of Oxford is simply not true. Further ask the recruitment partner of Slaughter and May, where the majority of their trainees have come from over the last 3 years? It is Bristol. Slaughter and May being recognised as the most fussy laew firm in terms of those it gives training contracts to.

    All of which means I can promise you unreseverdly, that if you read Law at UCL, LSE, Kings, Oxford,Cambridge, Bristol, and maybe Durham, you all have equal chance pound for pound.

    Finally I do have one regret about Bristol and that is...... not coming here for my undergrad.

    I hope this helps!
    LOL, I personally don't need help. I go to Oxford and from my experience (which is quite significant...as is my knowledge of the law societies of other universities) I KNOW that we are favoured above other law schools and I don't really need to go into examples of the amount of money law firms spend to prove my point.

    I agree that the schools you discuss are excellent but they aren't on Oxbridge level...now some will say that's merely an 'Oxbridge' viewpoint but look at the statistics...your precious Slaughter and May have over 46% from Oxbridge, that's pretty indicative of preference if you ask me...

    I wouldn't want to mislead any potential undergrads by suggesting that Oxford and Cambridge are not the best universities for law.

    Again, I am not saying the other universities aren't excellent choices and do offer great job prospects BUT I do think one must be realistic and follow the facts rather than having any feelings based on where one has gone to university.

    I would address the post in more detail if I thought it would make any impact but I feel that people who have a slight chip on their shoulder won't listen to others opinions anyway.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by cros)
    I wonder about this too...I have friends at UCL who freak out over writing one essay a term when I'm churning out at least two a week...while UCL is an excellent university it isn't equal to Oxford or Cambridge in terms of pressure, workload or desirability to employers.

    It's pretty obvious that if an employer has a candidate from UCL and one from Oxbridge, with the same grades and similar extra-curricular, they will probably choose Oxbridge. I have also noticed Oxbridge have a LOT more attention from law firms/chambers than other universities (e.g. dinners for each college - so eight of you with the firm rather than a presentation to two hundred). I'm not saying it's necessarily fair but it's the way it is and will remain this way for a long time. Oxbridge only has prestige because of the excellence of the teaching and you'll find the only people who criticise it have not studied there.

    Also, the quality of graduate teaching is generally irrelevant to most law firms/chambers as you will often find that post-grad study in law can make you look less dedicated to the profession and by no means places you above other candidates. It is always described as a 'bonus' but only considered after you have ticked the boxes of all other criteria.
    I think it's fairly truistic to say that people who have gone to Oxford won't criticise the quality of teaching. For one thing it's something that unites most of its applicants, and for another most of them will have no frame of reference.

    I was interviewed at Oxford and, personally, I found the tutors at that particular college somewhat disagreeable. I don't mean just in the interview itself; they're obviously quite at leisure to be disagreeable there. Even in the welcome session I was a bit turned off by them! I think that's one downside to the tutorial system. If you dislike even just one of the tutors you're not going to have a great time of it. Elsewhere you have much more varied exposure. I'm aware colleges send tutees to other colleges for certain subjects, but I'm talking quite broadly here.

    When you say excellence of teaching, do you mean the tutorial system or the actual teaching? Because I think it's worth pointing out that many academics at law schools other than Oxford and Cambridge have studied and taught at Oxbridge previously. So I think that muddies the waters if you were referring to the quality of the teaching itself.

    Finally, and this is more just a point of curiosity, do you know whether the essays the law students at UCL you mentioned were worried about were assessed? If they were, it's not difficult to see why they might be a bit more stressed over them. Just sayin'.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by LostInLaw)
    Newcastle...Sussex...Kent...I'd rather be at any of those than a couple of places on your list.
    Yay for Kent! Kent was 15 for law when I started last year.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by melonhead12)
    Yay for Kent! Kent was 15 for law when I started last year.
    I've seen Kent be anywhere between about 15 and 35 depending on the year and the league table since I started uni. Everything moves around so much that choosing university #24 over university #29 because it's a few places higher is fairly ridiculous.

    Portsmouth was #63 for Law when I started and will be #47 when I graduate. In the same time it has gone from #76 up to #60 and dropped down to #90 overall. Couldn't possibly predict what it will be by the time I finish training.

    Most things stay within the same sort of band, London South Bank won't shoot past Durham any time soon, but attaching numerical values to any uni is a fairly pointless endeavour when the differences are actually so negligible and interchangeable.

    League tables are okay as a very basic indicator of quality but really, it doesn't matter if Warwick is a couple of places higher than Manchester if your idea of hell is being at a campus university. LSE's place in relation to Durham is irrelevant if you want to avoid living in London.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: April 19, 2014
The home of Results and Clearing

1,340

people online now

1,567,000

students helped last year

University open days

  1. Keele University
    General Open Day Undergraduate
    Sun, 19 Aug '18
  2. University of Melbourne
    Open Day Undergraduate
    Sun, 19 Aug '18
  3. Sheffield Hallam University
    City Campus Undergraduate
    Tue, 21 Aug '18
Poll
A-level students - how do you feel about your results?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.