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I would really like your opinion on my revision methods? watch

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    I'm in year 10 and my last thread was about my 'mini-textbook' method etc. and I was asking for your opinions on whether it was too much. The majority of the responses suggested this so I tried out a new method this week:

    - Do homework
    - Record 'mini-lectures' (I am an auditory learner). Each 2 - 3 mins in length, for subjects attended to that day summarising key information in the lesson.
    - For 2 subjects a day, make a PowerPoint slide on at least 5 points for each subject for every point on the specification.
    - Free time.

    All of this took me 3 hours, however I didn't mind it. I preferred it much more to my previous method, and I felt it was extremely effective. However I don't quite like how time-consuming it is, so I've decided to cut it down. I wanted your opinion on WHICH METHOD DO YOU FEEL WOULD BE BETTER? (excluding homework):

    1) Recording the mini-lectures, listening over to them, then teaching an imaginary class the key points to check I understood it OR
    2) Doing the PowerPoint slides for exam subjects


    I combined all of these methods together because I didn't want to feel like I wasn't paying enough attention to my other subjects. For example, of I only focus on studying for my exam subjects I may fall behind in the ones I don't have exams in?

    Before you suggest studying a month prior to the exams (they are in June btw, I have 6 exams in 4 subjects, two are re-sits) I learn best by long-term revision. Thanks in advance!
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    It still sounds like too much to me, but if you learn best by long term revision I've got an idea - do you need to CHECK whether you understand something? When you're in lessons do you follow it?

    If you do, then you don't necessarily need to do all of this for every subject. Couldn't you just make sure you notes are organised, get your homework done, and then think about the most difficult parts of what you've done that day, and then do your lectures, or your powerpoints, or your mini textbook for those sections?

    I'm just thinking that that means you have cut it down, and you're only cutting down stuff that is unnecessary.
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    (Original post by twelve)
    If you do, then you don't necessarily need to do all of this for every subject. Couldn't you just make sure you notes are organised, get your homework done, and then think about the most difficult parts of what you've done that day, and then do your lectures, or your powerpoints, or your mini textbook for those sections?

    I'm just thinking that that means you have cut it down, and you're only cutting down stuff that is unnecessary.
    That sounds like a good idea, but I also want to retain every bit of information, if I'm only recording harder concepts I may forget the easy ones. I've come up with one idea, how about instead of doing the power points, I do mini-lectures for subjects attended to that day AND mini-lectures for the exam subjects, and when listening back to them, I write down information I think is really important on an A4 sheet of paper, then add to it each day. Once the sheet fills up, I try to condense the information more and more. I am an auditory learner after all, what do you think?
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    i like the mini-lecture idea; if you're an auditory learner it makes sense. you've got to be commended for starting so early btw however, remember it's only GCSE at this stage, so don't work yourself too hard.
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    Didn't know people revised in GCSE.

    Revision technique should be affective. If a technique helps you to remember a lot of stuff and in a quick amount of time do it.
    Personally, I've noticed that the people who take take notes twice + do tons of past papers are the ones who do well.
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    If you're an auditory learner then recording the mini-lectures as opposed to making PowerPoint slides would seem more effective for you.

    I'm intrigued as to how you can fit all the key points in a 2-3 minute timeframe.
    (Original post by FutureMedicalDoctor)
    I'm in year 10 and my last thread was about my 'mini-textbook' method etc. and I was asking for your opinions on whether it was too much. The majority of the responses suggested this so I tried out a new method this week:

    - Do homework
    - Record 'mini-lectures' (I am an auditory learner). Each 2 - 3 mins in length, for subjects attended to that day summarising key information in the lesson.
    - For 2 subjects a day, make a PowerPoint slide on at least 5 points for each subject for every point on the specification.
    - Free time.

    All of this took me 3 hours, however I didn't mind it. I preferred it much more to my previous method, and I felt it was extremely effective. However I don't quite like how time-consuming it is, so I've decided to cut it down. I wanted your opinion on WHICH METHOD DO YOU FEEL WOULD BE BETTER? (excluding homework):

    1) Recording the mini-lectures, listening over to them, then teaching an imaginary class the key points to check I understood it OR
    2) Doing the PowerPoint slides for exam subjects


    I combined all of these methods together because I didn't want to feel like I wasn't paying enough attention to my other subjects. For example, of I only focus on studying for my exam subjects I may fall behind in the ones I don't have exams in?

    Before you suggest studying a month prior to the exams (they are in June btw, I have 6 exams in 4 subjects, two are re-sits) I learn best by long-term revision. Thanks in advance!
    Edit: This may be more time-consuming, but have you considered doing both? Like, incorporate the audio in PowerPoint slides? Or would this be tantamount to what you're trying to avoid?
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    (Original post by dunnicare)
    Didn't know people revised in GCSE.
    It's the difference between getting an A* to an A
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    (Original post by Fred Ivanovic)
    It's the difference between getting an A* to an A
    Not at GCSE. Maybe it depends on the person. Don't want to be boastful but I didn't do that much revision in year 11 and I hit a few A*. I literally read class notes or text books in the case of the sciences.

    Actually, the only one I would recommend you revise the most thoroughly is maths. I think OP is well on there way to straight A* and if continues to do thorough revision straight A and A* at A level, because that's when there's no escaping.
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    Hi there :-) Nobody on here is going to be able to tell you how to revise; it's something that's very personal to you. I have a friend who used my revision advice and then failed all her exams at A Level whereas I got straight As because she wasn't the same type of learner as me and couldn't be bothered to work out what type she was!

    If your methods work well for you then that's great!
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    (Original post by dunnicare)
    Not at GCSE. Maybe it depends on the person. Don't want to be boastful but I didn't do that much revision in year 11 and I hit a few A*. I literally read class notes or text books in the case of the sciences.

    Actually, the only one I would recommend you revise the most thoroughly is maths. I think OP is well on there way to straight A* and if continues to do thorough revision straight A and A* at A level, because that's when there's no escaping.
    Its different for different people - I did nothing for Maths and got an A*, whereas I couldn't have got away without any revision for History for example.



    (Original post by FutureMedicalDoctor)
    That sounds like a good idea, but I also want to retain every bit of information, if I'm only recording harder concepts I may forget the easy ones. I've come up with one idea, how about instead of doing the power points, I do mini-lectures for subjects attended to that day AND mini-lectures for the exam subjects, and when listening back to them, I write down information I think is really important on an A4 sheet of paper, then add to it each day. Once the sheet fills up, I try to condense the information more and more. I am an auditory learner after all, what do you think?
    I think its unlikely, if I'm honest. For example, for maths, you don't forget how to add up simple numbers once you've moved on to algebra do you?

    It would probably be best to do different things for different subjects. Do a mixture of things for different topics - so if you're trying to explain something you did in Biology, then do your mini-lecture, but if you're trying to explain a Chemistry calculation, it would make more sense to do one of your little mini-textbooks. Does that make sense?

    At the end of the day, you've got to do what works for you, and if its works for you to record everything then you do that, but I would suggest trying to tailor your learning to whatever you are trying to learn. Also, I would have thought that if you learn the harder concepts now, for some subjects, then when it comes to revising later one, you'll be able to learn(even if you have forgotten them) the easier parts later.

    What subjects are you doing btw?
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    (Original post by twelve)
    I think its unlikely, if I'm honest. For example, for maths, you don't forget how to add up simple numbers once you've moved on to algebra do you?

    It would probably be best to do different things for different subjects. Do a mixture of things for different topics - so if you're trying to explain something you did in Biology, then do your mini-lecture, but if you're trying to explain a Chemistry calculation, it would make more sense to do one of your little mini-textbooks. Does that make sense?

    At the end of the day, you've got to do what works for you, and if its works for you to record everything then you do that, but I would suggest trying to tailor your learning to whatever you are trying to learn. Also, I would have thought that if you learn the harder concepts now, for some subjects, then when it comes to revising later one, you'll be able to learn(even if you have forgotten them) the easier parts later.

    What subjects are you doing btw?
    Great suggestions. Gave you rep I'm doing physics, biology, chemistry, maths, English, history, geography, Spanish and religious studies. My most difficult subjects are physics, maths and history (only exam technique).
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    (Original post by FutureMedicalDoctor)
    Great suggestions. Gave you rep I'm doing physics, biology, chemistry, maths, English, history, geography, Spanish and religious studies. My most difficult subjects are physics, maths and history (only exam technique).
    Okay, so from my own experience,,
    Science: Do what I suggested about different things for different topics. There isn't a massive amount of content for science, its more about understanding it, so you're best just making sure you understand whats going on, and then learning facts later.
    Maths: Again, its understanding - I found that once I learnt a method, I remembered it, but if its helps, do your mini-textbook full of worked examples and that should help
    English: No idea how to revise for English - I didn't do any :P But I guess its just knowing how to structure essays and being familiar with the set texts. But I guess since you are only in year 10, you probably haven't even looked at set texts for exams yet.
    History: Again, just make sure your notes are good - for one of my topics, there were a lot of important dates, so I had lots of pieces of paper stuck around the house to learn those, but this might be one where you can record yourself. Record it, save it and play it back to yourself while you're on the bus. My teachers did this for us a few weeks before the exam which was good.
    Geography: Didn't do it, so I won't offer any suggestions:P
    Languages: Verb of the week. Word of the day. Stick posters with verbs on around the house - I stuck mine on the wall opposite the toilet :P So that everytime you go past, you learn it. Word of the day, learn two words a day. And everytime you do it, test yourself on all the words you learnt before. Again, I didn't do any revision for this at all tbh.
    RE: Not a lot of revision, but for each topic, I did a quotes page - so for the Birth and Death topic, I had a page of Bible quotes, CCC references and general teachings. So I could basically answer most questions from these. Depends what RE you're doing though.

    I'll be honest, I wouldn't recommend you do any of the things I've said (except maybe verb of the week etc.) until next year ish really. But its up to you of course
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    I think what your doing is great, such dedication in year 10 is great, be proud of yourself. I also think it's great your doing this, and you should carry on. On the basis of it being to much, I would say just make sure you let yourself off frequently when there's something else you want to do.
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    (Original post by mathew551)
    This may be more time-consuming, but have you considered doing both? Like, incorporate the audio in PowerPoint slides? Or would this be tantamount to what you're trying to avoid?
    Sounds like a very good idea, what benefits do you think it would have?
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    (Original post by my_username_rocks)
    i like the mini-lecture idea; if you're an auditory learner it makes sense. you've got to be commended for starting so early btw however, remember it's only GCSE at this stage, so don't work yourself too hard.
    Thanks


    (Original post by Implo)
    I think what your doing is great, such dedication in year 10 is great, be proud of yourself. I also think it's great your doing this, and you should carry on. On the basis of it being to much, I would say just make sure you let yourself off frequently when there's something else you want to do.
    Thank you!
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    (Original post by FutureMedicalDoctor)
    Sounds like a very good idea, what benefits do you think it would have?
    You'd be incorporating all kinds of learning.

    You learn by writing when you type up the key points in your PowerPoint.

    You learn visually if you also incorporate key diagrams in your PowerPoints, which would be helpful for science subjects especially.

    You also learn by audio when you listen to what is being said in the PowerPoint.
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    Obviously everyone works differently and has their favourites ^^
    What always works really well for me is just making one big summary of everything that we did in class. I then revise the summary after.
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    Wow that seems like a lot of work for revising, all i do is go through the notes and gather the key points and then try to remember them as something else.

    Example below
    In one of my topics i had to study a man called mayo, he liked to reward people that had done well.. and to me mayo(naise) is something that is good for you, may be a bad example but you get the jist.
 
 
 
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