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    If we have the following reaction:

    2Mg(s) + O2 -----> 2MgO(s)

    Would this be an acceptable word equation?

    Solid magnesium + Oxygen gas -----> Solid magnesium oxide

    Or, we have to determine the number of moles of each? Or, this is not necessary since it is just an indication of the stoichiometry?

    Thanks.
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    (Original post by SWEngineer)
    If we have the following reaction:

    2Mg(s) + O2 -----> 2MgO(s)

    Would this be an acceptable word equation?

    Solid magnesium + Oxygen gas -----> Solid magnesium oxide

    Or, we have to determine the number of moles of each? Or, this is not necessary since it is just an indication of the stoichiometry?

    Thanks.
    Word equation doesn't have to show the stoichiometry of the elements/compounds.
    It'd have been better to write it like
    magnesium (s) + oxygen (g) ---> magnesium oxide (s)
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    (Original post by SWEngineer)
    If we have the following reaction:

    2Mg(s) + O2 -----> 2MgO(s)

    Would this be an acceptable word equation?

    Solid magnesium + Oxygen gas -----> Solid magnesium oxide

    Or, we have to determine the number of moles of each? Or, this is not necessary since it is just an indication of the stoichiometry?

    Thanks.
    That is correct (you've forgotten the (g) for O2 but it doesn't matter) and it is not necessary. You could calculate the number of moles if you knew the volume of O2 or the mass of either solid Mg or MgO, but you don't include the number of moles of each compound in the word equation.
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    (Original post by Zishi)
    Word equation doesn't have to show the stoichiometry of the elements/compounds.
    It'd have been better to write it like
    magnesium (s) + oxygen (g) ---> magnesium oxide (s)
    Got you. Thanks.
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    (Original post by mathew551)
    That is correct (you've forgotten the (g) for O2 but it doesn't matter) and it is not necessary. You could calculate the number of moles if you knew the volume of O2 or the mass of either solid Mg or MgO, but you don't include the number of moles of each compound in the word equation.
    Thanks for your reply. I mentioned "oxygen gas". It indicates that I have a gas oxygen, dosen't it?
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    (Original post by SWEngineer)
    If we have the following reaction:

    2Mg(s) + O2 -----> 2MgO(s)

    Would this be an acceptable word equation?

    Solid magnesium + Oxygen gas -----> Solid magnesium oxide

    Or, we have to determine the number of moles of each? Or, this is not necessary since it is just an indication of the stoichiometry?

    Thanks.
    Just write: Magnesium + Oxygen --> Magnesium oxide

    You don't need to write the number of moles reacting / produced for the chemicals or the state symbols in word equations - word equations only contain the names of the chemicals.
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    (Original post by thegodofgod)
    Just write: Magnesium + Oxygen --> Magnesium oxide

    You don't need to write the number of moles reacting / produced for the chemicals or the state symbols in word equations - word equations only contain the names of the chemicals.
    But, I think putting the states is acceptable. Don't you think so?
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    (Original post by SWEngineer)
    But, I think putting the states is acceptable. Don't you think so?
    Personally, I wouldn't include them in a word equation, although each to his own.
 
 
 
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