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AQA BIOL1 Biology Unit 1 Exam - 16th May 2011 watch

  • View Poll Results: Are you resitting this unit?
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    (Original post by EffKayy)
    Livia!!!
    I'm so stressed urgh... I feel like i don't know anything.
    You'll be fine!
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    (Original post by TlanTlan)
    Incorrect, sodium is pumped into the lumen of the intestine so that glucose can be absorbed through the sodium-glucose co-transporter protein. Which uses sodium travelling down its concentration gradient to move glucose moving against its concentration gradient through a co-transporter carrier protein.
    NO!
    She's correct
    Sodium ions get actively transported into the BLOOD, thereby leaving the lumen of the intestine with a higher concentration of sodium ions.
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    (Original post by TlanTlan)
    Incorrect, sodium is pumped into the lumen of the intestine so that glucose can be absorbed through the sodium-glucose co-transporter protein. Which uses sodium travelling down its concentration gradient to move glucose moving against its concentration gradient through a co-transporter carrier protein.
    Can we use this instead of saying incorrect

    Cos it's more fun

    Oh and do you need to mention when the glucose enters the epithelium the concentration of it increases so enters the blood as the blood has lower concentration?
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    How are the lungs adapted to their function, and describe the symptoms and effects of emphysema, fibrosis, and asthma on the lungs.

    It's a very big question but i'm sure lungs will come up
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    (Original post by TlanTlan)
    Incorrect, sodium is pumped into the lumen of the intestine so that glucose can be absorbed through the sodium-glucose co-transporter protein. Which uses sodium travelling down its concentration gradient to move glucose moving against its concentration gradient through a co-transporter carrier protein.
    No, that's not right. It goes into the blood. Look at June 09, question 7b.
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    (Original post by EffKayy)
    NO!
    She's correct
    Sodium ions get actively transported into the BLOOD, thereby leaving the lumen of the intestine with a higher concentration of sodium ions.
    Thanks
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    (Original post by EffKayy)
    NO!
    She's correct
    Sodium ions get actively transported into the BLOOD, thereby leaving the lumen of the intestine with a higher concentration of sodium ions.
    :O , i thought i knew this! Oh crap, time to go over that quick. Stress is also getting to me now!
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    (Original post by TlanTlan)
    :O , i thought i knew this! Oh crap, time to go over that quick. Stress is also getting to me now!
    Don't worry! I'm stressing out too, i kinda ish forgot what an SEM does !!!!!!! :|
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    I haaattteeeeee this unit the only thing interesting is immunity the rest is boooooooooorring : (
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    (Original post by TlanTlan)
    How are the lungs adapted to their function, and describe the symptoms and effects of emphysema, fibrosis, and asthma on the lungs.

    It's a very big question but i'm sure lungs will come up
    Diaphram pushes down and moves down when inhalation occurs to lungs have bigger space so pressure decreases which allows air in and the coverse of that too. They have avelus that increase surface area so faster diffusion. They are also small so small diffusion path way.
    Emphysema is caused by smoking and the elastin is stretched so less oxygen can be ventilated. Less diffusion as concentration gradient is lower. Symptons. Lack of air. Cough.

    Fibrosis is scar tissues forming so less elastic tissue. Thicker walls less diffusion. Shortness of breath, chest pains and dry coughs.

    Astma is a allergic reaction to dust and dirt. Causes a reaction so the air way closes up so less oxygen in so less concentration gradient. More mucas produced so covers aveolus so less surface area.

    I think.
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    (Original post by TlanTlan)
    How are the lungs adapted to their function, and describe the symptoms and effects of emphysema, fibrosis, and asthma on the lungs.

    It's a very big question but i'm sure lungs will come up
    Okaayyy..

    Adaped to their function:
    -Many alveloi - large surface area, greater rate of diffusion
    -Many cappilaries - ^
    -Thin wall of alveoli/cappilaries - short diffusion pathway
    -Ventilation / circulation - large conc. grad

    Emphysema - alveloi break down, and walls thinken - less s.area and longer diffusion pathway. Loss of elastin by elastase, can't recoil, reducded conc gradient. Less oxygen to tissues.

    Fibrosis - scar tissue due to asbestos etc, longer diffusion pathway. Twisted alveoli - less s.area. Hence lower conc gradient, so shortness of breath and coughing.

    Asthma - smooth muscle contracts, narrows lumen, more mucus from epithelial cells. Breathing rate increased, but tidal vol reducded. Wheezing, quick shallow breaths.

    Phew!
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    PanicPanicPanicPanic!!!!!!!!!! I THOUGHT I KNEW MOST OF THE STUFF! I DON'T!!!!!
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    (Original post by EffKayy)
    PanicPanicPanicPanic!!!!!!!!!! I THOUGHT I KNEW MOST OF THE STUFF! I DON'T!!!!!
    Takes deep breaths. Irony since lungs are being discussed
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    Just read through the thread. Very helpful but I'm surprised by how much info some people are putting. I'm just a CGP type of girl... got me through Gcses so fingers crossed

    Question a while back on why the secondary response is stronger and quicker... i learnt it was about affinity maturation (as well as more memory cells) ... anybody else learnt this?
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    (Original post by liviaaa)
    Okaayyy..

    Adaped to their function:
    -Many alveloi - large surface area, greater rate of diffusion
    -Many cappilaries - ^
    -Thin wall of alveoli/cappilaries - short diffusion pathway
    -Ventilation / circulation - large conc. grad

    Emphysema - alveloi break down, and walls thinken - less s.area and longer diffusion pathway. Loss of elastin by elastase, can't recoil, reducded conc gradient. Less oxygen to tissues.

    Fibrosis - scar tissue due to asbestos etc, longer diffusion pathway. Twisted alveoli - less s.area. Hence lower conc gradient, so shortness of breath and coughing.

    Asthma - smooth muscle contracts, narrows lumen, more mucus from epithelial cells. Breathing rate increased, but tidal vol reducded. Wheezing, quick shallow breaths.

    Phew!
    For the alveoli, it is essential to say the walls are folded to give a large surface area as the june 2010 paper only allowed that.
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    (Original post by ??????????????????)
    Takes deep breaths. Irony since lungs are being discussed
    If they ask about inspiration/expiration i'm going to consiously breathe in and out to see what happens to confirm my understanding :L
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    (Original post by Pin)
    Just read through the thread. Very helpful but I'm surprised by how much info some people are putting. I'm just a CGP type of girl... got me through Gcses so fingers crossed

    Question a while back on why the secondary response is stronger and quicker... i learnt it was about affinity maturation (as well as more memory cells) ... anybody else learnt this?
    I only use CGP. Rarely Nelson Thornes
    Nope never heard about this affity maturation.
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    For secondary response i put it as:

    There are already many memory cells from a previous infection by a pathogen, and these "remember" the antigen, so during the secondary response more antibodies are produced a lot quicker and these neutralise a pathogen and its toxins before symptoms of a disease begin to appear.

    I use a mixture of nelson thornes and CGP. Then i do all the past papers as both of them use words that AQA don't!
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    (Original post by Pin)
    Just read through the thread. Very helpful but I'm surprised by how much info some people are putting. I'm just a CGP type of girl... got me through Gcses so fingers crossed

    Question a while back on why the secondary response is stronger and quicker... i learnt it was about affinity maturation (as well as more memory cells) ... anybody else learnt this?
    Nope that sounds like a bit too much info?
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    (Original post by EffKayy)
    If they ask about inspiration/expiration i'm going to consiously breathe in and out to see what happens to confirm my understanding :L
    I actually do this when the diaphram comes up so I can feel the movements of it when I inhale/exhale Then I learnt about the pressure which makes more sense

    Air goes from high to low air pressure so when you inhale lungs are low air pressure to large area. Large area means diaphram moves down to give more space to lungs. Yay?
 
 
 
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