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AQA BIOL2 Biology Unit 2 Exam - 26th May 2011 watch

  • View Poll Results: Are you resitting this unit?
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    when talking aout genes, what does it mean when it refers to the 'locus'?

    any help appreciated, thanks!
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    (Original post by therapist_1)
    Antibiotics will kill bacteria. Bacteria is sometimes the site of which viruses can be taken in and modified to form new strands of viruses or reproduce the orignal virus. (I can't explain the theory as it is 'suggest'). Therefore in killing these bacteria would avoid production of viruses hence treating the viral disease. This is little from HSW from NT text book and most from my mind and not entirely sure..

    There are many types of haemoglobin (Hb), this depends on on the DNA that has coded for it. Each Hb organism contains Hb best suited to the environment they live in and can only have that one structure of Hb through out all the RBC.
    Example: People in high altitude have Hb with higher affinity for oxygen than people living in lower altitude, due to lack of abundant oxygen.

    -In the other hand that single type of Hb can change its shape slightly in response to CO2 levels. (will not go through the process).

    Hope you understand now.
    Thank you for your response, but I'm still a little confused. Also, what is RBC?

    (Original post by ChessMister)
    Are you sure the question is not, suggest why antibiotics cannot be used to treat viral diseases?
    I thought there had been a mistake too, but that's definitely what the question says!
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    (Original post by ryan02)
    when talking aout genes, what does it mean when it refers to the 'locus'?

    any help appreciated, thanks!
    The location of the gene on the chromosome.
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    (Original post by STARMissyB)
    Can somebody please help me and answer this?

    "Explain how the venous return of the blood to the heart is maintained?" (5 marks)

    Thanks
    I'm thinking:
    -valves
    -muscle tissue
    -which can contract
    not sure about the other 2 marks :/ maybe elastic tissue, recoiling and stuff. or...gravity? :P
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    (Original post by ryan02)
    when talking aout genes, what does it mean when it refers to the 'locus'?

    any help appreciated, thanks!
    Position of a gene on a DNA/Chromosome molecule
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    (Original post by Introverted moron)
    Thank you for your response, but I'm still a little confused. Also, what is RBC?


    I thought there had been a mistake too, but that's definitely what the question says!
    Red Blood Cells :]
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    how do people feel about dna replication it seems confusing,
    also does anyone know where the answers to the may 16th biology unit 1 paper are so i know roughly what i am on atm
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    (Original post by Insanity514)
    What is a tissue?

    We've been taught that it's and aggregation of similar cells grouped together to carry out one specific task.

    But the mark scheme says that they are of "common origin"

    So is the definition we've been taught still correct?

    Also what does it mean by switching on genes?
    Apparently when cells differentiate their genes are "switched on"???
    When cells differentiate they are specialising in a particular function to help carry out its role, so they can switch certain genes off, for example a muscle cell does not need the gene for eye colour so it switches that gene off etc. Hope that helps
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    (Original post by James A)
    unlucky you, i got maths in the morning and biol2 in the afternoon, but your timetable is deadly, what subjects you doing ??
    RS, Biology, Psychology and Maths is over now woo. You?
    I know, it makes me wanna die. But I'm not really helping myself by sitting here doing nothing...
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    (Original post by Master.K)
    I got...Chem1 tomorrow, then day off, then general studies paper teehee), then on thurs afternoon biol2 and then friday I got economics unit 2 and chemistry unit 2! And it's my leavers day!
    Leavers day?! What year are you in?
    Aha, I'm so glad I don't do chemistry!!
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    (Original post by STARMissyB)
    Can somebody please help me and answer this?

    "Explain how the venous return of the blood to the heart is maintained?" (5 marks)

    Thanks
    The venous return is part of the As-level PE syllabus, not so much in As-level biology;
    The mechanisms are:
    Skeletal muscle pump: Working muscles push on near by veins, when the contract, forcing blood back to heart.
    Respiratory Pump: a change in pressure causes the thoratic cavity to expand, pushing on nearby veins, (similar to the muscle pump).
    Valves: prevent back flow.
    Smooth muscles in veins: constrict, squeezing blood to heart.

    All this happens in the veins.
    Hope i could help
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    I've written some notes if anyone wants to have a look http://getrevising.co.uk/resources/aqa_biol2_notes
    and if I've got anything wrong please feel free to let me know!
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    (Original post by Introverted moron)
    Thank you for your response, but I'm still a little confused. Also, what is RBC?


    I thought there had been a mistake too, but that's definitely what the question says!
    Probably just stick to what I have said about viruses, and RBC = Red Blood Cells.

    Could you please tell me where have you found this question on antibiotics.:eek:
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    What is the best way in revising HSW, i just dont get it. Some of the answers in the mark scheme are obvious but I could have never thought of it in the exam.
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    So what do people think will be on this?
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    Can anyone explain to me the ' advantage of the S (sigmoid) shape curve for the oxgen-haemoglobin dissociation curve'
    i have this question come up in few test papers. :/

    Thanksssss
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    (Original post by heavencanwait_)
    So what do people think will be on this?
    probably some statistics, a bit of maths, general knowledge and maybe a little bit of biology (don't count on it though)
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    (Original post by LittleLaurenn)
    Can anyone explain to me the ' advantage of the S (sigmoid) shape curve for the oxgen-haemoglobin dissociation curve'
    i have this question come up in few test papers. :/

    Thanksssss
    Was it not to do with the fact that a small change in the partial pressure of the oxygen caused a large change in the saturation of the haemoglobin. I've only ever seen this question once, so I'm probably wrong :P
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    (Original post by LittleLaurenn)
    Can anyone explain to me the ' advantage of the S (sigmoid) shape curve for the oxgen-haemoglobin dissociation curve'
    i have this question come up in few test papers. :/

    Thanksssss
    After one molecule of oxygen bonds with haemaglobin it causes the quarternary 3d structure to change in such a way that it is easier for more oxygen molecules to bond. The benefit of this is that after one molecule of oxygen bonds with haemaglobin the affinity for oxygen increases so a small change in pO2 leads to a large change in saturation.

    I dunno how close i got.
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    What does it mean by the first two bases of the triplet code are the most important as they code for the amino acid??? Anyone been taught that?

    Also do we need to know anything about hypervariable regions in DNA? If so is it just not coding multiple repeats that can be used in DNA fingerprinting because the number of repeats in each person is different?
 
 
 
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