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AQA BIOL2 Biology Unit 2 Exam - 26th May 2011 watch

  • View Poll Results: Are you resitting this unit?
    YES!
    28.62%
    NO!
    71.38%

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    Do we only need to know 'semi-conservative' replication? because i'm sure there are other types :/
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    (Original post by TlanTlan)
    After one molecule of oxygen bonds with haemaglobin it causes the quarternary 3d structure to change in such a way that it is easier for more oxygen molecules to bond. The benefit of this is that after one molecule of oxygen bonds with haemaglobin the affinity for oxygen increases so a small change in pO2 leads to a large change in saturation.

    I dunno how close i got.

    (Original post by SmithytheDrummer)
    Was it not to do with the fact that a small change in the partial pressure of the oxygen caused a large change in the saturation of the haemoglobin. I've only ever seen this question once, so I'm probably wrong :P

    These sound pretty good to me!

    Thank you!! :')
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    Good Luck guys. I did struggle with AQA A-Level Biology so I feel your pain
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    (Original post by xkate1019x)
    Do we only need to know 'semi-conservative' replication? because i'm sure there are other types :/
    We just need to know semi conservative replication nothing else.:cool:
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    i am dreading how science works questions, but on every past paper i have done i got As and even full UMS !!( when i converted the raw mark to UMS) not trying to boast or anything, but i lost alot of marks on the papers, if the grade boundaries are that low, were all gonna be fine
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    Does anyone have examiners report for the papers..I cant find them anywhere..It would be much appreciated as Ive done all the papers and now need to go over them with the reports..really nervous about the exam
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    (Original post by Midnight_sun)
    i am dreading how science works questions, but on every past paper i have done i got As and even full UMS !!( when i converted the raw mark to UMS) not trying to boast or anything, but i lost alot of marks on the papers, if the grade boundaries are that low, were all gonna be fine
    Yeah same, I lost 20 marks in my mock and that was still 140 UMS :O
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    Can someone please tell me mark they think an A grade will be for the Bio unit2 Specimen paper?
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    Just going over my b iol2 notes, prefer this to biol1 tbh.
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    (Original post by EffKayy)
    Just going over my b iol2 notes, prefer this to biol1 tbh.
    Same, BIOL1 was so boring cuz it was regurgitating facts about diseases *yawn* This has more interesting concepts as it's broadened.
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    Can somebody please explain the answer to question 3d) in the Jan 2010 paper.
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    (Original post by V.I.P)
    Can somebody please explain the answer to question 3d) in the Jan 2010 paper.
    can somebody link the paper?
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    (Original post by V.I.P)
    Can somebody please explain the answer to question 3d) in the Jan 2010 paper.
    Just look at the pattern of the base sequence and see how many are repeated and how many times. For example, after the first Gln which is GTT, we have two TAC and no more after so we then look at the list of amino acids and there are two Met present so TAC codes for Met, etc. etc. etc.
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    (Original post by Reminisce)
    Just look at the pattern of the base sequence and see how many are repeated and how many times. For example, after the first Gln which is GTT, we have two TAC and no more after so we then look at the list of amino acids and there are two Met present so TAC codes for Met, etc. etc. etc.
    Oh I get it thanks! +ve rep.

    Also why i the last one Asn and not Gln?
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    When DNA replicates in Interphase do the chromosomes replicate as well? I don't understand june 09 4a?
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    (Original post by therapist_1)
    Probably just stick to what I have said about viruses, and RBC = Red Blood Cells.

    Could you please tell me where have you found this question on antibiotics.:eek:
    It was on a test that we did in class last year. The exact question was:

    3a) Antibiotics are used to treat bacterial infections but have no effect on viruses.

    ii) Suggest an explanation why antibiotics may sometimes usefully be given to patients suffering from a viral disease.

    b) Many antibiotics are produced by bacteria or fungi. Suggest an advantage to these organisms of producing antibiotics.

    I don't get this one either. Why do bacteria produce substances that could kill them? :confused:
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    DNA replicates forming two chromatids, and during prophase these condense to form double armed chromosones, which consist of 2 identical chromatids joined by a centromere.
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    I prefer biology unit 1, I thought it was far more interesting. I enjoyed learning how the diseases affected the body and how the molecules are built up. In Bio 2 though, I find some bits really interesting, like dna replication and genetic diversity but I can't stand the plant section.
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    This is going to sound stupid because it's something I should obviously know, but I still dont fully understand the relationship between cells, chromosomes, chromatids, genes, DNA etc...

    I was told a good analogy a few years ago but I can't remember it too well. It was something like:

    Imagine the cell as a library, the chromosomes are the shelfs, the genes are the books, the dna are the words etc...

    Is that right??
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    (Original post by should be revising)
    This is going to sound stupid because it's something I should obviously know, but I still dont fully understand the relationship between cells, chromosomes, chromatids, genes, DNA etc...

    I was told a good analogy a few years ago but I can't remember it too well. It was something like:

    Imagine the cell as a library, the chromosomes are the shelfs, the genes are the books, the dna are the words etc...

    Is that right??
    no genes are sections of dna that code for sequence of amino acids so dna would be the book and gene the words
 
 
 
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