Turn on thread page Beta
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ollie901)
    90/90 in unit 1
    143/150 in unit 2
    57/60 in the AS coursework
    87/90 in unit 4
    high A on coursework, not entirely sure on mark yet.

    So yeah between about 15 and 25 to get in the last exam depending on coursework.

    Shouldn't be too much of an issue
    Daymmnn.. I thought I was pretty good with only needing 40/120 to get an A and 100/120 to get an A*!

    Got 81/90 in Unit 1
    137/150 in Unit 2
    52/60 AS Coursework
    90/90 in Unit 4
    80/90 in A2 Coursework

    So yeah, I'm working hard(ish) to try and get an A*, was tempted to retake some AS units to get 100% in them! haha!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by RobG93)
    Daymmnn.. I thought I was pretty good with only needing 40/120 to get an A and 100/120 to get an A*!

    Got 81/90 in Unit 1
    137/150 in Unit 2
    52/60 AS Coursework
    90/90 in Unit 4
    80/90 in A2 Coursework

    So yeah, I'm working hard(ish) to try and get an A*, was tempted to retake some AS units to get 100% in them! haha!
    DAAAAAAAAAAAAMMMMMNNN!!!! How did you Revise for unit 4 I failed mine... Im an r-tard when it comes to Chem never sure how to revise for it. I just read books instead of doing questions... I think that is my problem. Anyway tips on how you revised would be very helpful
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by kinkin)
    DAAAAAAAAAAAAMMMMMNNN!!!! How did you Revise for unit 4 I failed mine... Im an r-tard when it comes to Chem never sure how to revise for it. I just read books instead of doing questions... I think that is my problem. Anyway tips on how you revised would be very helpful
    Chemistry comes quite naturally to me, so I generally don't do too much revision, but I go through Chemical Ideas and make sure the fundamental concepts are totally solid in my mind, then do questions, etc. Past Papers are a dream for revision and look at the mark schemes, many questions pop up time and time again, so knowing what they're looking for is very useful.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by RobG93)
    Chemistry comes quite naturally to me, so I generally don't do too much revision, but I go through Chemical Ideas and make sure the fundamental concepts are totally solid in my mind, then do questions, etc. Past Papers are a dream for revision and look at the mark schemes, many questions pop up time and time again, so knowing what they're looking for is very useful.
    Do you by any chance have the f335 and f335 jan 2011 paper and mark scheme?
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    Does anyone know how to calculate oxidation state of elements within brakets? Really confused.. please help me

    There was a question in the JAN 2011 F335 paper:

    Give the oxidation state of arsenic in Cu(As02)2, assuming that copper has +2 oxidation state.

    The answer on the mark scheme is +3.. How did they get that? helpp !!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ManPowa)
    Does anyone know how to calculate oxidation state of elements within brakets? Really confused.. please help me

    There was a question in the JAN 2011 F335 paper:

    Give the oxidation state of arsenic in Cu(As02)2, assuming that copper has +2 oxidation state.

    The answer on the mark scheme is +3.. How did they get that? helpp !!
    - Every compound must have an oxidation state of 0;
    - O has a -2 oxidation state (this would be assumed knowledge);
    - It says in the formula that it is O2, so is -2*-2.
    - It is in doubled brackets, so it is (-2*-2)*2, giving total oxidation state for O in the equation as -8;
    - It says in the question oxidation state of Cu is +2, so there must be +6 somewhere. The As is the only place this can come from;
    - As the As is in doubled brackets, it is assumed that the +6 is twice the oxidation state of the As;
    - As oxidation state is therefore +3.

    This probably looks like a lot, but I'd thought I'd try to explain step-by-step in as much detail as necessary. (Chemical formula are italicized)
    Hope this helps...
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jpurkis1)
    - Every compound must have an oxidation state of 0;
    - O has a -2 oxidation state (this would be assumed knowledge);
    - It says in the formula that it is O2, so is -2*-2.
    - It is in doubled brackets, so it is (-2*-2)*2, giving total oxidation state for O in the equation as -8;
    - It says in the question oxidation state of Cu is +2, so there must be +6 somewhere. The As is the only place this can come from;
    - As the As is in doubled brackets, it is assumed that the +6 is twice the oxidation state of the As;
    - As oxidation state is therefore +3.

    This probably looks like a lot, but I'd thought I'd try to explain step-by-step in as much detail as necessary. (Chemical formula are italicized)
    Hope this helps...
    Thanks a lot that was the best explanation ever, and you couldn't have done it any better.
    Im stuck with another problem also to do with redox etc. How do you go about naming inorganic compounds? I find this difficult, my teacher is absolutely useful when it comes to stuff likes this.
    For example, KN02, Fe(N03)3, N20.
    These are just a few example, but for any inorganic compund where and how do you start.
    Thanks in advance
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    How do you go about naming inorganic compounds? I find this difficult, my teacher is absolutely useful when it comes to stuff likes this.
    For example, KN02, Fe(N03)3, N20.
    These are just a few example, but for any inorganic compund where and how do you start.
    Thanks in advance
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hey does anyone have the agriculture and industry end of module test answers?
    Looked everywhere for them but can't seem to find them.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ManPowa)
    How do you go about naming inorganic compounds? I find this difficult, my teacher is absolutely useful when it comes to stuff likes this.
    For example, KN02, Fe(N03)3, N20.
    These are just a few example, but for any inorganic compund where and how do you start.
    Thanks in advance
    I don't think there's really a starting point, you just need to familiarise yourself with them and they'll eventually sink in.

    KN02 - Potassium Nitrite (NO2- ion is known as a nitrite ion, so you get ___ nitrite)
    N2O - Nitrous Oxide (or Dinitrogen Monoxide) - just say what you see, two N and one O, it's also laughing gas

    I think learning the suffixes helps more, eg, Nitrate is NO3-, Carbonate is CO3^2-, Hydrogencarbonate is HCO3-, Phosphate is PO4-, Sulfate is SO4^2- etc. Also, try to think of compounds that are like the one you need to name, eg if you get MgCO3, then you may remember CaCO3 (Calcium Carbonate), hence you get Magnesium Carbonate. That's a pretty bad example, but you see my point.

    Basically, it's all down to just looking at and remembering various compounds and the general structure. Hope this helps
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ManPowa)
    Does anyone know how to calculate oxidation state of elements within brakets? Really confused.. please help me

    There was a question in the JAN 2011 F335 paper:

    Give the oxidation state of arsenic in Cu(As02)2, assuming that copper has +2 oxidation state.

    The answer on the mark scheme is +3.. How did they get that? helpp !!
    You need to break it down :dance:, no not that kind..

    Haha, but seriously, you are given that Cu is +2, you can then see that the whole thing has no charge, so the brackets must make the whole thing = 0, As you have two lots of (AsO2) you know that it AsO2 must have a charge of -1. In most cases (although there are a number of notable exceptions), oxygen is -2, and so this gives you an oxidation state of -2 * 2 = -4. You then need the the AsO2 to have a charge of -1, so you know that the Arsenic has a charge of +3.

    Do you see the method I used? It's more important here to see HOW the answer is derived. Let me know if any part of this has lost you. Hope this helps

    Edit: I've been beaten to it, see faster poster above ;D
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    Any one got any predictions/lists about whats going to come up?

    Looking at the last two papers, i got a feeling about GLC? What do you think?
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ManPowa)
    Any one got any predictions/lists about whats going to come up?

    Looking at the last two papers, i got a feeling about GLC? What do you think?
    GLC probably will come up although, the questions I've seen on it appear to be a quite straight forward description of the equipment or stuff about affinity for the stationary phase.

    In my opinion the following will come up.

    Oxidation States
    Why things are coloured
    Equalibria and le chatelier's principle
    Friedel Crafts
    (Some random other organic reactions I'm sure)
    Reflectance or absorbtion spectra.
    Shapes of molecules.
    Spectroscopy
    Acid calculations
    And lots of little bits about IM forces.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by limetang)
    GLC probably will come up although, the questions I've seen on it appear to be a quite straight forward description of the equipment or stuff about affinity for the stationary phase.

    In my opinion the following will come up.

    Oxidation States
    Why things are coloured
    Equalibria and le chatelier's principle
    Friedel Crafts
    (Some random other organic reactions I'm sure)
    Reflectance or absorbtion spectra.
    Shapes of molecules.
    Spectroscopy
    Acid calculations
    And lots of little bits about IM forces.
    Affinity of the stationary phase?
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jpurkis1)
    Affinity of the stationary phase?
    Nothing specific really. Just that there may be a question that asks: why does compound a have a higher retention time than compound b. The answer for which would be either that compound a has a higher affinity for the stationary phase than compound b does.
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    Does anyone know where I could get the activities and assignment answers from the storyline book? I really want to do the assignments and I don't know where to get them from.. e.g 'Activity CD4.2 will help you understand how substitution reactions take place'.

    Can anyone help? :d
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    Am i the only person who doesn't use the story lines book?
    I find it contains too much unnecessary information.
    Should i start using it?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by tkoki1993)
    Am i the only person who doesn't use the story lines book?
    I find it contains too much unnecessary information.
    Should i start using it?
    Yh, i thought it was pretty crap too. Ive never used it and ive scored quiet well.

    Unit Mark
    1 88/90
    2 127/90
    3 55/60
    6 88/90
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by tkoki1993)
    Am i the only person who doesn't use the story lines book?
    I find it contains too much unnecessary information.
    Should i start using it?

    (Original post by Legit)
    Yh, i thought it was pretty crap too. Ive never used it and ive scored quiet well.

    Unit Mark
    1 88/90
    2 127/90
    3 55/60
    6 88/90
    Can I ask what books do you guys use then? I mean do you just read out of a book and do a couple of past papers or do you make notes, and constantly read them?
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Legit)
    Yh, i thought it was pretty crap too. Ive never used it and ive scored quiet well.

    Unit Mark
    1 88/90
    2 127/90
    3 55/60
    6 88/90
    And i think you need an E to get an A overall lol. So basically, you need to fail to pass. Haha but i doubt that, you'll get your usual grade
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
Updated: June 13, 2012
Poll
Do you think parents should charge rent?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.