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    Hi everyone!

    I have created this thread as to see and discuss what people think of teaching as a career!I believe that understanding the motives and drives of becoming a teacher are many and that we all have different view on what a 'quality' teacher should be like! Please share your views, and if anyone is an university student considering teaching as a career, that will be even more interesting to see the reasons behind that choice!!!Thank you.
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    I've just dropped off a PGCE course.
    My reasons were that I wanted to share knowledge, and to help people. Also, it seemed a stable profession.

    I know that the second reason is 'wrong' and people might say it was why I dropped off: teaching isn't as 'stable' as it used to be, especially not in terms of pay and conditions with the growth of the academy. Hey, a person's got to make enough money to live!

    However, the real reason I dropped off was that I was increasingly disillusioned with the education system. I found that teaching was not so much a case of sharing knowledge, it was crowd control. And children were almost epected to misbehave in class: there was this pre existing notion in teacher's minds, which in turn led to the kids misbehaving. Also, the 'best' teachers did not care about the kids at all, and often referred to them in terms of animals.

    I realise that that's not too helpful to anyone wanting to go into teaching: my advice would be spend as much time in classrooms as possible to make sure it's what you really want to do, and if you have any doubts whatsoever, think long and hard about it.
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    I just want to get it out there that experience REALLY does make a difference. Not just for your knowledge but it can enlighten you into interests you didn't necessarily believe you have and I wouldn't for one moment regret my decision to take up a Education degree beginning this September

    If anyone is currently doing experience and is facing challenges that is making them question their career in teaching, don't listen to them! If you know deep down it's what you want to do ignore any obstacles in your way. On so many occasions I've wanted to give up when a child's presented me with challenging behaviour but then I remind myself it's because I'm a student and kids know they can get away with it with you! [We used to be the same if you think about it...with students and supply teaching!]

    If it's the right career for you, it'll be a very rewarding career...and it'll also be a rewarding learning process to the future generation you teach

    xx
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    (Original post by Teao the Cat)
    I've just dropped off a PGCE course.
    My reasons were that I wanted to share knowledge, and to help people. Also, it seemed a stable profession.

    I know that the second reason is 'wrong' and people might say it was why I dropped off: teaching isn't as 'stable' as it used to be, especially not in terms of pay and conditions with the growth of the academy. Hey, a person's got to make enough money to live!

    However, the real reason I dropped off was that I was increasingly disillusioned with the education system. I found that teaching was not so much a case of sharing knowledge, it was crowd control. And children were almost epected to misbehave in class: there was this pre existing notion in teacher's minds, which in turn led to the kids misbehaving. Also, the 'best' teachers did not care about the kids at all, and often referred to them in terms of animals.

    I realise that that's not too helpful to anyone wanting to go into teaching: my advice would be spend as much time in classrooms as possible to make sure it's what you really want to do, and if you have any doubts whatsoever, think long and hard about it.
    So, what's your plan now? I ask because I've applied for a PGCE but imagine I too will get fed up with the system.
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    (Original post by Teao the Cat)

    However, the real reason I dropped off was that I was increasingly disillusioned with the education system. I found that teaching was not so much a case of sharing knowledge, it was crowd control. And children were almost epected to misbehave in class: there was this pre existing notion in teacher's minds, which in turn led to the kids misbehaving. Also, the 'best' teachers did not care about the kids at all, and often referred to them in terms of animals.
    O.o The best teachers I have are the ones that care about whther we manage or not, and who'll help us!
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    (Original post by Melanie-v)
    O.o The best teachers I have are the ones that care about whther we manage or not, and who'll help us!
    By the 'best' teachers, I don't mean those that the students like and appreciate, but those considered by the school to be good. They tend to be almost diametric oposites, with a few exceptions


    (Original post by starfired)
    So, what's your plan now? I ask because I've applied for a PGCE but imagine I too will get fed up with the system.
    Going to do an MA in librarianship... considered it before applying for the PGCE, but was talked into teaching because it was more 'secure'- national pay scales and such.
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    I want to go into teaching because, cliche as it is, I really do want to make a difference. The going does get really tough on placement and sometimes I consider whether I should have gone for a different career path but I know deep down I could never just do a 9-5 office job or similar. Teaching is so incredibly rewarding and having responsibility for the care and education of 30 children is an amazing priviledge.
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    lol at all the people saying they are doing it "for the kids". They really want an easy job with long holidays. those who cant do teach. its said a lot because its so true.
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    sorry disagree
    i have no intention whatsoever of becoming a teacher, but my mum is one and she is really (and i know you will all just think im being a mummys girl) but really really talented and a brilliant writer.
    to be able to teach people you have to understand things REALLy well, and you have to have patience, firmness, assertiveness, be understanding.... all sorts of skills and abilities that i dont have
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    (Original post by gilesthewhale)
    lol at all the people saying they are doing it "for the kids". They really want an easy job with long holidays. those who cant do teach. its said a lot because its so true.
    It's a good job we don't all think like you then, isn't it?

    You're deluded if you think teaching is an easy job, as is anyone. It's probably one of the most difficult jobs and requires total dedication.

    And as for the holiday comments....No, they don't get long holidays. The majority of weekends are spent planning, evaluating, assessing, resource making and arranging for the following week. Similarly in half term it's normal the topics change in schools...you know they do learn more than one topic in subjects so new things then have to be made for that and displays don't just appear out of no where.

    The only decent amount of time I say they get off is summer....and even then at least a week of that is spent by teachers re-arranging their new classroom and getting everything ready for September.

    So as you were saying....easy and long holidays? Anyone who thinks that needs to have another look at the job description of teaching!!!
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    (Original post by Lazylisa)
    It's a good job we don't all think like you then, isn't it?

    And as for the holiday comments....No, they don't get long holidays. The majority of weekends are spent planning, evaluating, assessing, resource making and arranging for the following week. Similarly in half term it's normal the topics change in schools...you know they do learn more than one topic in subjects so new things then have to be made for that and displays don't just appear out of no where.

    The only decent amount of time I say they get off is summer....and even then at least a week of that is spent by teachers re-arranging their new classroom and getting everything ready for September.


    So as you were saying....easy and long holidays? Anyone who thinks that needs to have another look at the job description of teaching!!!
    I think teaching is a difficult job and one of the most important as you are educating the next generation. I have no desire to do it at all and am impressed so many people want to go into this career.

    HOWEVER, teachers DO get extremely long holidays compared to every other profession. That is a fact. My graduate job gives me 4 weeks holiday a year and I will be spending a lot of my weekend studying for my ACA exams. I think teachers get 12 weeks off! Also, you may spend your weekends doing class prep at the start of your teaching career but you won't after a while as teachers use the same worksheets, slides, etc every single year. Also, "a week arranging a classroom" - i think that would take a day at most.

    Just to be clear, I am not saying teaching is an easy career. It really isn't and I could not deal with kids all day every day. But don't complain about the holidays as they are absolutely fantastic for teachers. They are also, in my cynical mind, the main reason a lot of people go into teaching!
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    Both my parents were teachers and both of them hated it. It is a very hard job. From what I gather from talking to them and their colleagues it all depends on your head teacher. If they can instil discipline and a work ethic within the pupils and teachers then it is a joy to teach in such a school. Unfortunately theses heads and schools are a rarity these days.

    Also the entry requirements to enter the teaching profession are ridiculously low. I'm not saying you have to be some kind of genius to teach, but I'm sure I'm not the only person who has saw some teachers and people going into teaching and thinking "god help the kids that get taught by them".

    In order for teachers to get better pay and more respect as a profession they need to raise the standards across the board, but their unions prevent this from happening because it means sacking useless teachers.
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    (Original post by Teao the Cat)
    By the 'best' teachers, I don't mean those that the students like and appreciate, but those considered by the school to be good. They tend to be almost diametric oposites, with a few exceptions
    I'd disagree with this. The teacher who I think is the best by miles, gives an awful lots of time to her students and respects them - and I don't really know anyone who doesn't respect her. The deputy head (who I know out of school) mentioned to me that they know she's the best teacher they have. Discipline is pretty bad at my school, but not completely crazy. Generally teachers bad at discipline are thought of as bad teachers - but there are two categories of those who are good at discipline: those who don't care about their students, and those who do. From what I've seen, both the school and students like the latter the most.
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    (Original post by Melanie-v)
    O.o The best teachers I have are the ones that care about whther we manage or not, and who'll help us!
    I agree, but in addition to that I do think that the best teachers are those who comand respect from their students, as if you have a student who respects a teacher they are much more likely to want to do well to impress this teacher they admire and as such will behave in lessons and will pay attention.

    But obviously for a teacher to comand respect from their students they must first earn respect which I suppose is the difficulty, and of course you will always have those students who don't want to learn and so will never respect a teacher.
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    I'm doing a PGCE now.

    I love teaching because I really like working with young people, they're so funny and often really want to work hard. I love it when I can tell that they've learned new things in lessons. I want to enable young people to make good decisions in life.

    I also have to agree with Teao the Cat. Teachers have to put up with so much ****. Students have no respect for teachers. A 50 year old man at my school was told to **** off by on 11 year old and a 12 year old told a 60 year old female cover supervisor to suck his....you know where I'm going with this! last week and nothing was done about it.

    At parents evening last week I didn't leave school until 9 o'clock and didn't get home until half ten. Then teachers have Ofsted to deal with.

    I want to be a teacher but at the same time I don't want to spend every weekend of my life marking lessons and being verbally abused by 11-16 year olds isn't exactly what I went into this job for.
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    I often think I want to teach, and it's still something I consider.

    It's strange because I've been an awful pupil - been thrown out of multiple schools, more exclusions than I can remembers etc. I just see that I've had some really bad and some really good teachers and the difference between them is so easy to recognize, and the students recognize it; I certainly recognized it.

    I think I would only want to teach A level and above though, and would probably therefore prefer to teach in a college or sixth form, or at a university but that's another story.
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    just please please please don't teach if you're not passionate about teaching or you don't want to teach.

    GCSE graphics design teacher :puke: the most insignificant human being (I've come across thus far).

    But if you really do want to teach :top: We need more people like you
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    (Original post by BookWormShanti)
    I'd disagree with this. The teacher who I think is the best by miles, gives an awful lots of time to her students and respects them - and I don't really know anyone who doesn't respect her. The deputy head (who I know out of school) mentioned to me that they know she's the best teacher they have. Discipline is pretty bad at my school, but not completely crazy. Generally teachers bad at discipline are thought of as bad teachers - but there are two categories of those who are good at discipline: those who don't care about their students, and those who do. From what I've seen, both the school and students like the latter the most.
    You're lucky enough to have had one of the exceptions then.
    However, I've seen teachers who are considered excellent that treat kids as their slaves: they won't spend a minute doing something if they can get a child to do it, even if it will delay that child to their next lesson and the teacher has a free afterwards. I've been told never to say please or thank you to a pupil, because 'it's not my place to give them respect, they should be respecting me'. It's one of the things that made me pack it in- why should I expect any respect without giving something back?
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    Am I missing something? I have been a teacher coming up for 15 years and I have a blast with the kids, I enjoy my job and I don't do it for the long holidays.

    I enjoyed my school when I was there, one or two teachers really inspired me. I went into teaching in a sink school and it was hard but there were moments of joy as well. If you like a challenge is the KEY thing. If you get easily bored, then teaching might be for you, never a dull moment and its constantly changing. Plus when they get a good grade you will be celebrating too.

    There is no snoozing at the back of a bottom set year 9 class you have to be on your toes. If your lesson goes well then there is no better feeling in the world to top it. Yes it may not go well, but learn what doesn't work and grow from it.

    I find bad lessons as useful as good ones, so I rarely have a bad one now because I have built up a profile of each group and what works. I spend lessons "data mining" building up a picture of each student and what makes them tick. I trawl IEPs and tackle SENCOs in the corridor for teaching strategies and add this to my data. I know that XYZ student doesn't hand in his homework on time because of home problems and not because he is lazy. We need to take the time (as teachers) to find out, then there are no surprises.

    OK there may be the occasional nutter that won't fall into line, but if you get off to a firm start with a purpose, don't leave any slack in the lesson they co-operate and get on with the task in hand. Firm but fair is the key. I also find the rule that the attention span is as long as their age e.g 15 years = 15 mins so I switch activities.

    Teaching - you make it your own experience.
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    (Original post by revisionstation)
    I also find the rule that the attention span is as long as their age e.g 15 years = 15 mins
    How depressing. Are kids really this thick?
 
 
 
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