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    (Original post by dinotopiaisawful)
    Also, you may spend your weekends doing class prep at the start of your teaching career but you won't after a while as teachers use the same worksheets, slides, etc every single year. Also, "a week arranging a classroom" - i think that would take a day at most.

    But don't complain about the holidays as they are absolutely fantastic for teachers. They are also, in my cynical mind, the main reason a lot of people go into teaching!
    I agree with the first part in the sense it'll get easier after you've been qualified for a few years and begin to build up a bank of resources. Any teacher who uses the same worksheets etc every year is just setting themselves up for tedious lessons and I think that would highlight the minority who do go into teaching thinking it's an easy job. I know I certainly won't be using the same cycle each year as I'd get bored teaching the exact same stuff to the kids! A 2 - 3 year cycle would be better.

    And trust me, it REALLY doesn't just take a day! Maybe if a teacher was staying in the same room for the next year it'd take a few days, but if you imagine a teacher having to move let's say for example a Year 1 class into a classroom that was previously used for Year 5's....All of the Year 1 furniture would have to be moved out and the Year 5 in as the desks and chairs for example would be too high for the younger ones. You then have to take into consideration all resources from just basic pens, pencils and paints to bookcases, books, desks because trust me teacher's don't leave them behind they prefer to keep their own! Then comes all the different displays to be made, and then put up...you don't want the children coming into an empty classroom in September....that's just the start of it

    And I agree there will be a few who do enter the teaching profession for the long holidays in which cause poo to them, I hope they get no further than a year into it unless they truly to care about the progression of children too!

    xx
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    (Original post by Lazylisa)
    I agree with the first part in the sense it'll get easier after you've been qualified for a few years and begin to build up a bank of resources. Any teacher who uses the same worksheets etc every year is just setting themselves up for tedious lessons and I think that would highlight the minority who do go into teaching thinking it's an easy job. I know I certainly won't be using the same cycle each year as I'd get bored teaching the exact same stuff to the kids! A 2 - 3 year cycle would be better.

    And trust me, it REALLY doesn't just take a day! Maybe if a teacher was staying in the same room for the next year it'd take a few days, but if you imagine a teacher having to move let's say for example a Year 1 class into a classroom that was previously used for Year 5's....All of the Year 1 furniture would have to be moved out and the Year 5 in as the desks and chairs for example would be too high for the younger ones. You then have to take into consideration all resources from just basic pens, pencils and paints to bookcases, books, desks because trust me teacher's don't leave them behind they prefer to keep their own! Then comes all the different displays to be made, and then put up...you don't want the children coming into an empty classroom in September....that's just the start of it
    And I agree there will be a few who do enter the teaching profession for the long holidays in which cause poo to them, I hope they get no further than a year into it unless they truly to care about the progression of children too!

    xx

    Nice reply. I was talking about secondary school/post 16 teaching with regard to setting up classes/lesson plans and, to be honest, didn't even consider primary school. What you say about setting up classrooms makes sense for primary schools.

    Good luck with primary school teaching. I believe that is one of the most rewarding jobs you can have as you are teaching kids skills that will last them a lifetime (reading, writing, etc).
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    (Original post by Teao the Cat)
    By the 'best' teachers, I don't mean those that the students like and appreciate, but those considered by the school to be good. They tend to be almost diametric oposites, with a few exceptions
    More like if they can fulfil the tick boxes required by Ofsted to be "Outstanding".
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    It's not quite the same, but at the moment I'm teaching ESL (English as a Second Language) so I can give some feedback on that...
    Teaching kids is, imo, horrible, especially in a private school. They are mostly middle-class brats whose parents just want to get rid of them for the afternoon. That said, you do get moments that are really rewarding, and some of the kids are really nice. It may not seem like much to you guys, but when one of my four year olds says "Can I have the pencil-sharpener please?" without being prompted or anything, it's a great feeling.
    Teaching adults is a lot more fun. You have more interesting conversations, get to mess around and play games anyway, but without the need to yell at them or threaten to call their parents.
    The worst thing about teaching has to be the whole "finish the textbook asap" thing. You really don't have time to do anything in more detail (especially if, like me, you arrive in January and your predecessor has done sod all) because the head teacher and admin staff just push you to get through the book and test the students again and again.
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    (Original post by im so academic)
    More like if they can fulfil the tick boxes required by Ofsted to be "Outstanding".
    Precisely. Ofsted see very little of lessons, and can make some very bizarre judgements on teachers.
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    (Original post by dinotopiaisawful)
    Nice reply. I was talking about secondary school/post 16 teaching with regard to setting up classes/lesson plans and, to be honest, didn't even consider primary school. What you say about setting up classrooms makes sense for primary schools.

    Good luck with primary school teaching. I believe that is one of the most rewarding jobs you can have as you are teaching kids skills that will last them a lifetime (reading, writing, etc).
    Ah right yeah, definitely post 16 would take a lot less time to sort out as the structure of their classrooms is pretty much the same!

    I totally agree, thanks.
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    (Original post by gilesthewhale)
    lol at all the people saying they are doing it "for the kids". They really want an easy job with long holidays. those who cant do teach. its said a lot because its so true.
    How ignorant, teaching is a profession for a reason. My mother teaches and works longer hours than anyone I know 8am til 5:30pm at school, then home and more work for a couple of hours. She's even doing work now on Mother day!

    The long holidays are never 'holidays' as such, as when the children are out the classroom it needs revamping and preparing for the next term. Planning, marking and assessments all need to be completed, and much more.

    Like I say, there's a good reason why teachers are put in the same professionals category as lawyers.

    OP, I'm currently doing a HND in early years and my reasons for doing so vary. I don't think there's anything more rewarding than helping a child and seeing their progression throughout the year. Teaching and working with children is something I genuinely enjoy, at times it doesn't even feel like work. Also, without wanting to sound big headed I have taken to my course and study like a duck to water, it's like my natural calling.
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    (Original post by Lazylisa)
    It's a good job we don't all think like you then, isn't it?

    You're deluded if you think teaching is an easy job, as is anyone. It's probably one of the most difficult jobs and requires total dedication.

    And as for the holiday comments....No, they don't get long holidays. The majority of weekends are spent planning, evaluating, assessing, resource making and arranging for the following week. Similarly in half term it's normal the topics change in schools...you know they do learn more than one topic in subjects so new things then have to be made for that and displays don't just appear out of no where.

    The only decent amount of time I say they get off is summer....and even then at least a week of that is spent by teachers re-arranging their new classroom and getting everything ready for September.

    So as you were saying....easy and long holidays? Anyone who thinks that needs to have another look at the job description of teaching!!!
    long holidays, excellent job security, decent pay, good pensions. I am amazed at how much teachers complain about their jobs. If they had worked in a proper graduate job where you are stuck in an office from 9-6 they would know how well off they were.
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    (Original post by MovingOn)
    How ignorant, teaching is a profession for a reason. My mother teaches and works longer hours than anyone I know 8am til 5:30pm at school, then home and more work for a couple of hours. She's even doing work now on Mother day!

    The long holidays are never 'holidays' as such, as when the children are out the classroom it needs revamping and preparing for the next term. Planning, marking and assessments all need to be completed, and much more.

    Like I say, there's a good reason why teachers are put in the same professionals category as lawyers.OP, I'm currently doing a HND in early years and my reasons for doing so vary. I don't think there's anything more rewarding than helping a child and seeing their progression throughout the year. Teaching and working with children is something I genuinely enjoy, at times it doesn't even feel like work. Also, without wanting to sound big headed I have taken to my course and study like a duck to water, it's like my natural calling.
    you cannot seriously say that a teacher is in the same category as a lawyer. they are much lower, for good reason.
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    (Original post by gilesthewhale)
    long holidays, excellent job security, decent pay, good pensions. I am amazed at how much teachers complain about their jobs. If they had worked in a proper graduate job where you are stuck in an office from 9-6 they would know how well off they were.
    Yes, I agree, they are well off compared to someone stuck in an office 9 - 6 but that's probably because they actually got off their backside and did something, you know like spend all those years and hard work training? If that isn't the reason for being stuck in an office then those people must have obviously wanted a career in an office in which case boo hoo to them if they complain!

    Teaching is one of the most rewarding careers ever but requires the utter most dedication. I think far too many people on the outside frown upon teaching and don't realise just how much effort they put into their jobs. Don't hate it until you've tried it!
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    (Original post by Lazylisa)
    Yes, I agree, they are well off compared to someone stuck in an office 9 - 6 but that's probably because they actually got off their backside and did something, you know like spend all those years and hard work training? If that isn't the reason for being stuck in an office then those people must have obviously wanted a career in an office in which case boo hoo to them if they complain!

    Teaching is one of the most rewarding careers ever but requires the utter most dedication. I think far too many people on the outside frown upon teaching and don't realise just how much effort they put into their jobs. Don't hate it until you've tried it!

    Yes, exactly! And teaching is incredibly hard work, you're not just sat in your desk typing at a computer, you are doing a physically and mentally exhausting job.


    FWIW, I'm going into teaching (secondary English PGCE) because I love English, because I want to help people have good creative writing skills, and because social disadvantage in education really matters to me and I want to be a good teacher in tough schools, helping young people get out of the rut of poverty by achieving more for themselves. Even if they don't end up going on to uni or pursuing English as an interest, I want to know I've given them skills to write a good CV, argue a point insightfully and eloquently, and write nicely with good spelling and grammar. Those are all important life skills.
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    I think people frown upon teaching not because it is an easy job, but because it is what a lot of graduates turn to if they don't know what to do with their life. I'm sure a lot of people go into teaching for the right reasons. However, many also go into it because it is comparatively quite easy to get on to PGCE courses (secondary not primary which i imagine is more difficult). From what i gather it is just application form and interview. Whereas for many graduate jobs you need to go through several stages (applicatioin form, online tests, telephone interview, first interview, assessment day, partner interview).

    A friend of mine is going into teaching for the simple reason that he doesn't think he would get any other graduate job.

    I probably should add that people like my friend will probably quit teaching in a few years when they realise it is a lot of hard work! I have the upmost respect for teachers as i know it is a job that i would be rubbish at and one which takes a lot of dedication.
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    (Original post by arabcnesbit)
    How depressing. Are kids really this thick?
    It's not about being thick or clever its about how long your attention will hold. TV mostly to blame with 15 mins then an ad break then 15 mins.

    After 15 mins your mind wanders and you need fresh input to bring it back on track.
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    (Original post by revisionstation)
    It's not about being thick or clever its about how long your attention will hold. TV mostly to blame with 15 mins then an ad break then 15 mins.

    After 15 mins your mind wanders and you need fresh input to bring it back on track.
    I was only being facetious. Interesting point about TV though. Do you think my business idea for adverts during lessons every 15 mins is a winner then?
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    (Original post by arabcnesbit)
    I was only being facetious. Interesting point about TV though. Do you think my business idea for adverts during lessons every 15 mins is a winner then?
    Forget teachers- just put a tv in front of them instead!!

    Last week I showed YR9s a really really dull 5 minute clip on digging for oil and this boy remembered every single fact that the narrator had said whereas if I had said the exact same thing he wouldn't have listened and would probably have interrupted me 3 times while saying it.

    :iiam:
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    (Original post by JupiterSunshine)
    Forget teachers- just put a tv in front of them instead!!

    Last week I showed YR9s a really really dull 5 minute clip on digging for oil and this boy remembered every single fact that the narrator had said whereas if I had said the exact same thing he wouldn't have listened and would probably have interrupted me 3 times while saying it.

    :iiam:
    Let's combine forces and go on Dragons' Den!
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    (Original post by arabcnesbit)
    Let's combine forces and go on Dragons' Den!
    It's a deal!!
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    (Original post by gilesthewhale)
    you cannot seriously say that a teacher is in the same category as a lawyer. they are much lower, for good reason.
    Yes, they are and the rest of the world recognises this.
 
 
 
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