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How much is your political views influenced by your parents? watch

  • View Poll Results: How much are you influenced?
    I don't have views/my parents aren't political.
    6
    6.06%
    Our views are very similar.
    22
    22.22%
    Similar leaning, but different on a fair few issues.
    33
    33.33%
    Agreed on a few issues, but generally opposing.
    20
    20.20%
    Our views are radically different.
    18
    18.18%

    • PS Reviewer
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    20
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    PS Reviewer
    My mum couldn't care less and I never had a chance to talk to my dad about it - so not at all.
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    14
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    (Original post by A Bit of Fry and Laurie)
    My father was a Conservative and my mother voted Labour so by rights I suppose I should vote Liberal Democrat. But in fact I'm a Nazi.
    :awesome:
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    13
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    My whole family is Labour, and yep- they had a pretty big impact.

    But I think it's more about what values they install in you, I know Tory parents who have made a more liberal child because they just didn't preach to them. My parents brought me up to be very socially aware in knowing that we were very fortunate compared to others and that we should always help people in need, sent me to a state school over private to have a more realistic view of the world and got me involved in doing things for charity. I think that's what made me a bit of a leftie rather than their own political views.
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    3
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    I've never asked my parents their view on politics.
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    15
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    My parents have never tried to influence my views, I asked mum about it once and she said my dad was raised in an Irish Catholic family and didn't want to impose it on me too, same went for politics.

    They don't really talk about Politics, although I know mum voted Tory last year but voted Labour in the election before that, My dad stays out of politics, my older brother is a liberal democrat and I've yet to form a concrete political stance although atm I'm leaning towards Tories.
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    18
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    (Original post by Gromit94)
    I'd always thought I believed the same as my parents, then I took Government and Politics AS and learned it all myself and found that I believe different.
    You went from following one set of people to another then?
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    14
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    My parents voted for Liberal Democrats in last election. I don't really associate myself with any political party, but I do agree with few conservative policies. :yes:
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    9
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    (Original post by Llamageddon)
    You went from following one set of people to another then?
    Isn't all politics about the different beliefs of "one set of people"?!
    I learned the pros and cons of Socialism, Liberalism and Conservatism and decided Socialism best fitted me.
    It's not that I'm now adopting another group's opinions just because there's another group there, I decided upon this by myself, for myself.
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    quite a bit, i think; though I often challenge some of the rubbish that they can come out with
    • Welcome Squad
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    13
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    Welcome Squad
    (Original post by Concupiscible)
    My mother voted labour last election, but my father didn't vote! He was "on call" and was "needed at the hospital" :O I was disgusted! And now he's complaining about what the Tories are doing to the nhs!
    I wish I was old enough to vote...
    i don't know if anyone has mentioned this (i've only read the first page so far) but you can get somebody to vote on your behalf so that could be an option for him next time.
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    13
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    Neither of my parents reveal which way they voted. Not even to each other. I can just tell they both vote Conservative. I'm pretty much apolitical.
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    0
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    My parents both vote Labour. I am a libertarian.
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    19
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    Old man is probably closest to a Libertarian type - though he's the ultimate "nice guy" he is from a conservative/upper middle class/Haileybury background and I suspect he is a little more intollerant at his core than he likes to let on

    Mam's a Green/Labour supporter - though I have no idea how she voted in the last few elections as for some reason she's a bit shady about it

    I voted for Boris in the London elections as the man is a ledge and for the Conservatives last year as I've felt it's been time for change for quite some time. I abhor certain cretinous Labour politicians, as well as some of the things the party did to our country/other countries, and I did not want for an unstable hung parliament situation. I tend to vote for Lib Dems in local elections as they do a good job in the wards in which I've lived


    Beyond the 'Colour of Your Banner'
    I'm not a big fan of the party political system, mainstream political 'compromise' or the (associated) emphasis on 'political economy', nor do I feel that the black and white political spectrum with which we are supposed to be content is entirely constructive, or useful, in the 21st century.. so I do not think of myself wedded to any particular party/movement as such

    I believe in neo-pragmatism, taking a fresh look at issues and seeking solutions that are in the nation's best interests over the very long-term

    I see a need to preserve certain functions and norms but in general I am against Conservatism for the stubborn sake of it and actually something of a libertarian on a many issues, and a collectivist on some of the key ones e.g. paths to social mobility/the real 'BIG society'. That said, my pragmatist personal philosophy, grounding in empirical economics, and certain social, political and international political insights, have lead me to adopt positions on some issues e.g. immigration that many (on here at least) would consider 'far right'


    TL;DR
    I'm a complicated political animal with positions that span the traditional political spectrum who is strongly right leaning on a handful of issues but takes a more progressive stance on the bulk of the social/economic political issues - absolutely nothing like my parents who pick a party that best fits the way they think of themselves and roll with it :rolleyes:
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    My parents both voted Conservative in the election (though they used to vote Labour), and have generally very conservative views (they can sometimes be quite bigoted). However I am very liberal (though I don't know much about economics, I would think I am liberal in that sense too), and a leftie, though I don't support any party.
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    (Original post by Foo.mp3)
    Old man is probably closest to a Libertarian type - though he's the ultimate "nice guy" he is from a conservative/upper middle class/Haileybury background and I suspect he is a little more intollerant at his core than he likes to let on

    Mam's a Green/Labour supporter - though I have no idea how she voted in the last few elections as for some reason she's a bit shady about it

    I voted for Boris in the London elections as the man is a ledge and for the Conservatives last year as I've felt it's been time for change for quite some time. I abhor certain cretinous Labour politicians, as well as some of the things the party did to our country/other countries, and I did not want for an unstable hung parliament situation. I tend to vote for Lib Dems in local elections as they do a good job in the wards in which I've lived


    Beyond the 'Colour of Your Banner'
    I'm not a big fan of the party political system, mainstream political 'compromise' or the (associated) emphasis on 'political economy', nor do I feel that the black and white political spectrum with which we are supposed to be content is entirely constructive, or useful, in the 21st century.. so I do not think of myself wedded to any particular party/movement as such

    I believe in neo-pragmatism, taking a fresh look at issues and seeking solutions that are in the nation's best interests over the very long-term

    I see a need to preserve certain functions and norms but in general I am against Conservatism for the stubborn sake of it and actually something of a libertarian on a many issues, and a collectivist on some of the key ones e.g. paths to social mobility/the real 'BIG society'. That said, my pragmatist personal philosophy, grounding in empirical economics, and certain social, political and international political insights, have lead me to adopt positions on some issues e.g. immigration that many (on here at least) would consider 'far right'


    TL;DR
    I'm a complicated political animal with positions that span the traditional political spectrum who is strongly right leaning on a handful of issues but takes a more progressive stance on the bulk of the social/economic political issues - absolutely nothing like my parents who pick a party that best fits the way they think of themselves and roll with it :rolleyes:
    Who's your local councillor? I help out with the Reading Lib Dems a fair amount; Kirsten Bayes, Daisy Benson et al.

    Do you know Pete Walley/Mark Whiley?
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    My views are quite similar to my mum's but since we rarely talk about politics, I think it's just a coincidence. One of my friends is very, very Conservative and both her parents are Labour-obsessed, which is interesting.
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    0
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    Not much, we always seem to disagree on almost every issue locally, nationally and globally. I have some conservative views on some things and liberal views on others. I no longer support labour though.
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    19
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    (Original post by Wilzman)
    Kirsten Bayes, Daisy Benson et al
    Aye they're me yocals

    (Original post by Wilzman)
    Do you know Pete Walley/Mark Whiley?
    Nein, had to google them - not really involved with student politics (for perhaps obvious reasons!)
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    18
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    Dad is a Tory, Uncle (Dads side) is a Tory councillor. Mums side is Generally left wing.
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    2
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    My mum and my dad are scottish nationalists and I am too.
 
 
 
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