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    Hello. I'm new here but I think this is the perfect place for seeking the advice/info which I much need right now!

    So, I'm 13 and I attend a local school. However, I'm really interested in Science - many aspects! I absolutely LOVE it. I also enjoy Mathematics very much. I'm hoping to become a cardiovascular surgeon - but that's irrelevant.

    What I want to know from you guys is if you think I'll be able to handle Quantum Physics and understand it at this age.
    Also, what do I have to do to be able to understand it?
    Shall I first learn all the basics of physics at my KS3 level? Such as forces, electromagnet spectrum, moments, astronomy, light, sound, ect (I'm pretty familiar with it all already).

    Should I then move onto GCSE stuff - I am 13 and have two years left until I start them.

    And then shall I begin learning out QP? Or, will I be ok with the knowledge I already possess? I dont mean that I want to become a genius and maybe come up with my own theories and stuff. No, no. Just study it and know what it's about and perhaps do some questions and stuff so I can become pretty familiar with it.

    What do you guys suggest? Also, how should I study it? I recently ordered a beginners guide on Quantum Physics. I am currently awaiting its arrival.

    Please do suggest some ideas! Thank you.

    - Misaki. ^_^
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    You sound passionate, but to go into any sort of depth, you're going to need to learn a lot of Maths. I don't think you'll be able to understand all of it, but by reading as much as possible, you're certainly not doing yourself any harm.

    Although I should point out even the most brilliant of minds struggle with Quantum Physics. I don't even try. To quote Feynmann "I think I can safely say that nobody understands quantum mechanics."
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    Dude you need to get laid.

    More seriously though, it's a good thing physics takes your fancy but best to take it slow. Try basic GCSE Physics to whet your appetite and read other simpler magazines/books that'll help you gain a background understanding of physics. Best to master the basics first and then get advanced

    EDIT: Oh btw, on TSR, we speak to each other in a normal font. Jussayin. :ninja:
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    Quantum Physics is very interesting and seeing as you're this passionate I don't see why you can't start to look at the basics now. Don't think that you'll understand most of it, even professors like Feynmann admit they don't understand it.

    However, I recommend you start looking at entry level books if you're interested in finding out more as you don't need to know much physics to get an idea of a lot of quantum theory (admittedly any QP you learn now will be basic, but interesting none the less). When I was roughly your age I was given this book. It's a bit like an advanced version of horrible science. It gave me a good starting point and I have since gone on to read all kinds of books. The Feynmann books are also very good if you want to try looking at a higher level. Tbh your best bet is just to try books about Quantum Theory and see how it goes for you.
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    (Original post by jonnyboy1993)
    Quantum Physics is very interesting and seeing as you're this passionate I don't see why you can't start to look at the basics now. Don't think that you'll understand most of it, even professors like Feynmann admit they don't understand it.

    However, I recommend you start looking at entry level books if you're interested in finding out more as you don't need to know much physics to get an idea of a lot of quantum theory (admittedly any QP you learn now will be basic, but interesting none the less). When I was roughly your age I was given this book. It's a bit like an advanced version of horrible science. It gave me a good starting point and I have since gone on to read all kinds of books. The Feynmann books are also very good if you want to try looking at a higher level. Tbh your best bet is just to try books about Quantum Theory and see how it goes for you.
    Ah I see... If you don't mind me asking, how old are you now? + what are you doing with your life atm?
    As you did say, you began at my age... I'd just like to know where it has lead you to..
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    1)Times mentioned your age in one post, including title: 3
    2)Mentions the "irrelevant" wish to become a "cardiovascular surgeon"
    3)Wants to know about quantum Physics
    4)Ends the post with some weeaboo, maybe your name, maybe something else...

    I-take-you-serious points acquired: -8

    I like your passion regarding science, but the sad truth is that it will need time. Smartness doesn't matter that much- rather dedication. Someone who loves to understand quantum physics and wants to be a surgeon of a very specific, difficult (next to neuro-surgery) probably hardest sub-section of surgery sounds rather like a passionate dreamer than a dedicated science-marathon-runner.

    I do not say this to diss you. I just want to point out that you should get the basics first. I am a bit like you: I want to be cyberneticist by doing a medical doctorate; a microbiology (focus on virology and immunology) master and a mechatronics/robotics/cognitive science bachelor parallel and another, more specific (cybernetics, bionics or android/robotics ?), Master at Lomonosov Moscow State Uni or Osaka Uni and to crown the efforts with a doctorate at MIT. What I want to do: researching intelligent prosthetics.

    How realistic does this sound? Not very. From my own experience I can tell that you should inform yourself about the basic stuff that you need before you start with the big issue: quantum physics.

    Therefore do NOT buy scientific books about QP before you don't know about the basics. Otherwise it might confuse you and diminish your... dreamers' enthusiasm. Read popular books about it and make yourself clear WHY you want to know about this. Science has its lean times- therefore you need a solid motivator, a reason, why you want to learn about this. And why you really want to b a surgeon. I think you simply love the challenge. nothing wrong with it, though.
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    (Original post by OkashiAddict)
    Ah I see... If you don't mind me asking, how old are you now? + what are you doing with your life atm?
    As you did say, you began at my age... I'd just like to know where it has lead you to..
    I'm now 18 and in my final year of school. If I make the grades this summer I'll be going to read maths at Cambridge next year (It's a big if).

    As far as physics goes. I got really into QP and particle physics and read loads of books especially in years 10/11. I even managed to get some work experience at the NPL. But eventually I realised that I prefer maths to physics and that's the route I'm heading down now. But it really is as simple as picking up a few books and seeing what you enjoy and then reading more about that.
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    (Original post by patientology)
    1)Times mentioned your age in one post, including title: 3
    2)Mentions the "irrelevant" wish to become a "cardiovascular surgeon"
    3)Wants to know about quantum Physics
    4)Ends the post with some weeaboo, maybe your name, maybe something else...

    I-take-you-serious points acquired: -8

    I like your passion regarding science, but the sad truth is that it will need time. Smartness doesn't matter that much- rather dedication. Someone who loves to understand quantum physics and wants to be a surgeon of a very specific, difficult (next to neuro-surgery) probably hardest sub-section of surgery sounds rather like a passionate dreamer than a dedicated science-marathon-runner.

    I do not say this to diss you. I just want to point out that you should get the basics first. I am a bit like you: I want to be cyberneticist by doing a medical doctorate; a microbiology (focus on virology and immunology) master and a mechatronics/robotics/cognitive science bachelor parallel and another, more specific (cybernetics, bionics or android/robotics ?), Master at Lomonosov Moscow State Uni or Osaka Uni and to crown the efforts with a doctorate at MIT. What I want to do: researching intelligent prosthetics.

    How realistic does this sound? Not very. From my own experience I can tell that you should inform yourself about the basic stuff that you need before you start with the big issue: quantum physics.

    Therefore do NOT buy scientific books about QP before you don't know about the basics. Otherwise it might confuse you and diminish your... dreamers' enthusiasm. Read popular books about it and make yourself clear WHY you want to know about this. Science has its lean times- therefore you need a solid motivator, a reason, why you want to learn about this. And why you really want to b a surgeon. I think you simply love the challenge. nothing wrong with it, though.
    Thank you for your advice - I really do appreciate it. However, you could have been a little softer. You seem a lot older than me! Also, I said it's irrelevant only because you don't need to know about what I want to be, but I just described it as that as I'd already typed it. GEEZ somebody is picky!!

    Yes, I shall take your advice on board. Thanks once again.

    DOES IT MATTER TO YOU WHETHER ITS MY NAME OR NOT.
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    (Original post by OkashiAddict)
    Hello. I'm new here but I think this is the perfect place for seeking the advice/info which I much need right now!

    So, I'm 13 and I attend a local school. However, I'm really interested in Science - many aspects! I absolutely LOVE it. I also enjoy Mathematics very much. I'm hoping to become a cardiovascular surgeon - but that's irrelevant.

    What I want to know from you guys is if you think I'll be able to handle Quantum Physics and understand it at this age.
    Also, what do I have to do to be able to understand it?
    Shall I first learn all the basics of physics at my KS3 level? Such as forces, electromagnet spectrum, moments, astronomy, light, sound, ect (I'm pretty familiar with it all already).

    Should I then move onto GCSE stuff - I am 13 and have two years left until I start them.

    And then shall I begin learning out QP? Or, will I be ok with the knowledge I already possess? I dont mean that I want to become a genius and maybe come up with my own theories and stuff. No, no. Just study it and know what it's about and perhaps do some questions and stuff so I can become pretty familiar with it.

    What do you guys suggest? Also, how should I study it? I recently ordered a beginners guide on Quantum Physics. I am currently awaiting its arrival.

    Please do suggest some ideas! Thank you.

    - Misaki. ^_^
    Hahahahahaa. I don't mean to be mean its great that you like science. But yeah I'm embarking on a Physics degree and Quantum physics requires extreme concentration study and mathematical flair its even above my level (just a passing interest at the moment) They don't teach it in the first year of alot of Undergraduate courses just because its so difficult. Just because you read the words and know about quantum effects doesn't mean you understand Quantum mechanics.

    You're not even starting your GCSE's yet its laughable that you could understand Quantum mechanics. Sure you can read words and know the names of stuff but you don't understand it

    Why can I be sure?? Even the most brilliant scientists with phDs and years on you still find Quantum Mechanics difficult to get to grips with and near impossible to 'understand'. The only reason its still around is because it makes such accurate predictions. You'll probably need a thorough understanding of calculus and undergraduate Physics and Chemistry to get a full appreciation and you've not even started your GCSE's.
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    (Original post by insoms)
    Hahahahahaa. I don't mean to be mean its great that you like science. But yeah I'm embarking on a Physics degree and Quantum physics requires extreme concentration study and mathematical flair its even above my level (just a passing interest at the moment) They don't teach it in the first year of alot of Undergraduate courses just because its so difficult. Just because you read the words and know about quantum effects doesn't mean you understand Quantum mechanics.

    You're not even starting your GCSE's yet its laughable that you could understand Quantum mechanics. Sure you can read words and know the names of stuff but you don't understand it

    Why can I be sure?? Even the most brilliant scientists with phDs and years on you still find Quantum Mechanics difficult to get to grips with and near impossible to 'understand'. The only reason its still around is because it makes such accurate predictions. You'll probably need a thorough understanding of calculus and undergraduate Physics and Chemistry to get a full appreciation and you've not even started your GCSE's.
    Gosh. People on this can be mean. Nevertheless, exactly! I shouldn't have said understand it then. I just want to be more familiar with it and actually know what it's about... I can try...
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    Yes, you will be able to understand a few aspects of it but not many.
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    (Original post by OkashiAddict)
    Gosh. People on this can be mean. Nevertheless, exactly! I shouldn't have said understand it then. I just want to be more familiar with it and actually know what it's about... I can try...
    There we go, this will set you off.... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quantum_mechanics

    And maybe end it there. Why do you want to do this?
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    read popular science books.
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    I'm almost certain you're a troll, but in case there are others genuinely in this position reading this thread, here's my advice: Don't go jumping in to the deep end. You'll need to take it one step at a time, otherwise you won't understand any of it and you'll juts be put off which would be a shame. Even studying it at university you probably wouldn't understand it, but you should at least be able to understand the argument as to why quantum mechanics is the leading theory. Physics is a broad subject and it's all intertwined. It's pretty futile to hope to understand just one segment of it when ignoring the rest. I don't really know what the best thing to do would be other than reading more casual books. I am dubious about pop science books though as you don't learn anything from them. They're just there to tell you what's currently being proposed and there's no way to possibly understand it. You just ahve to take their word, and I find that defeats the object of physics.
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    http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/quantumin...n/qi/tutorials
    try the easy ones
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    (Original post by Tomato_Soup1992)
    I'm almost certain you're a troll, but in case there are others genuinely in this position reading this thread, here's my advice: Don't go jumping in to the deep end. You'll need to take it one step at a time, otherwise you won't understand any of it and you'll juts be put off which would be a shame. Even studying it at university you probably wouldn't understand it, but you should at least be able to understand the argument as to why quantum mechanics is the leading theory. Physics is a broad subject and it's all intertwined. It's pretty futile to hope to understand just one segment of it when ignoring the rest. I don't really know what the best thing to do would be other than reading more casual books. I am dubious about pop science books though as you don't learn anything from them. They're just there to tell you what's currently being proposed and there's no way to possibly understand it. You just ahve to take their word, and I find that defeats the object of physics.
    Isn't it normal for someone of my age being interested in this subject? Why would you think I'm a troll~?! -Misaki cries-
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    Thank you <3
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    You're not going to understand the ins and outs of it without a lot of maths, but they're the boring parts anyway. Pick up Quantum Theory Cannot Hurt you by Marcus Chown, fantastic book which explains the fundamentals and some of the more advanced stuff without requiring much preknowledge.

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Quantum-Theo...1765807&sr=8-1
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    It depends on when you want a mathematical or qualitive description of QM...
    The latter can be understood pretty easily from science publications, the former is more rigorous and an actual understanding however it depends on your mathematical ability
    and in fact, you only really need to be able to do calculus
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    You could probably learn about the basics of Quantum Physics at your age, though you won't be able to go into the advanced stuff.

    It's good to see you've got such an interest. Might I suggest possibly looking into how Quantum Physics fits in (or, more accurately, how it doesn't) with General Relativity? That's a fascinating topic of Physics, the search for a unifying theory such as String Theory. I don't think you need a degree-level understanding of Physics to understand it, so you might be interested in that.

    You should definitely watch these videos by String Theorist Brian Greene. It's a documentary on String Theory and how it's believed that it might link Quantum Physics with General Relativity. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ULlR_pkHjUQ

    (For the first video, I suggest skipping to about 5 minutes in. The first five minutes give a basic introduction to what you'll see over the three episodes and a bunch of advertising)

    If you have any questions, ask me and I'll discuss them with you.
 
 
 
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