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    (Original post by mobius323)
    You could probably learn about the basics of Quantum Physics at your age, though you won't be able to go into the advanced stuff.

    It's good to see you've got such an interest. Might I suggest possibly looking into how Quantum Physics fits in (or, more accurately, how it doesn't) with General Relativity? That's a fascinating topic of Physics, the search for a unifying theory such as String Theory. I don't think you need a degree-level understanding of Physics to understand it, so you might be interested in that.

    You should definitely watch these videos by String Theorist Brian Greene. It's a documentary on String Theory and how it's believed that it might link Quantum Physics with General Relativity. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ULlR_pkHjUQ

    (For the first video, I suggest skipping to about 5 minutes in. The first five minutes give a basic introduction to what you'll see over the three episodes and a bunch of advertising)

    If you have any questions, ask me and I'll discuss them with you.
    Thank you so much! I really appreciate it! + thank you for remaining so positive instead of some others who replied, laughing at me.
    I shall do, your advice has made me remain optimistic! <3
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    You could try How to Teach Quantum Physics to Your Dog as a popular introduction to quantum mechanics written by someone who's not trying to sell String Theory at the same time (I would advise not worrying about String Theory at this point. There is more to physics than that).
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    I'm doing A2 physics now, and trust me learnt the basics first, GCSE etc. it comes in very handy, it is hard due to so many formulas and theory you must know and if you already know say 25% before starting, What could be better?
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    I was also interested in quantum physics and the like since I was little. Gonna throw it out there that reading into it early will really make you frustrated though your school experience. Extra-curricular knowledge is penalised almost because of the way the system seems to work. However you gotta chase what your passionate about right?

    Reading into normal physics is good but with quantum physics you gotta throw all that out the window anyway. My advice would be to read every good physics book you can get your hand on. You wont understand much of it at all BUT you'll find that the ideas will stick up there in your head and as you grow up and your understanding of things in general matures... it'll come right back out and you will be able to pick up all the idea's a lot quicker than your peers.

    Quantum physics is a very exciting field and age is a little bit of a barrier to understanding anything really. What I mean by that is your potential understanding... You could be 13 and understand something better than an 18 year old does, but when you are 18 you will always understand better than you used to do so get in there early!
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    Age is irrelevant now since you have already passed the 'what' stage but are into 'why' stage. The first three volumes by Sir Richards Philips Feynman should make you indulge into proper quantum mechanics.
    I recommend book 'The Meaning of Quantum Theory' by Baggott.

    Provided you're keen.
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    (Original post by ibysaiyan)
    Age is irrelevant now since you have already passed the 'what' stage but are into 'why' stage. The first three volumes by Sir Richards Philips Feynman should make you indulge into proper quantum mechanics.
    I recommend book 'The Meaning of Quantum Theory' by Baggott.

    Provided you're keen.
    Thank you
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    (Original post by RFextra)
    I was also interested in quantum physics and the like since I was little. Gonna throw it out there that reading into it early will really make you frustrated though your school experience. Extra-curricular knowledge is penalised almost because of the way the system seems to work. However you gotta chase what your passionate about right?

    Reading into normal physics is good but with quantum physics you gotta throw all that out the window anyway. My advice would be to read every good physics book you can get your hand on. You wont understand much of it at all BUT you'll find that the ideas will stick up there in your head and as you grow up and your understanding of things in general matures... it'll come right back out and you will be able to pick up all the idea's a lot quicker than your peers.

    Quantum physics is a very exciting field and age is a little bit of a barrier to understanding anything really. What I mean by that is your potential understanding... You could be 13 and understand something better than an 18 year old does, but when you are 18 you will always understand better than you used to do so get in there early!
    I agree - thanks! ^_^
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    (Original post by patientology)
    1)Times mentioned your age in one post, including title: 3
    2)Mentions the "irrelevant" wish to become a "cardiovascular surgeon"
    3)Wants to know about quantum Physics
    4)Ends the post with some weeaboo, maybe your name, maybe something else...

    I-take-you-serious points acquired: -8

    I like your passion regarding science, but the sad truth is that it will need time. Smartness doesn't matter that much- rather dedication. Someone who loves to understand quantum physics and wants to be a surgeon of a very specific, difficult (next to neuro-surgery) probably hardest sub-section of surgery sounds rather like a passionate dreamer than a dedicated science-marathon-runner.

    I do not say this to diss you. I just want to point out that you should get the basics first. I am a bit like you: I want to be cyberneticist by doing a medical doctorate; a microbiology (focus on virology and immunology) master and a mechatronics/robotics/cognitive science bachelor parallel and another, more specific (cybernetics, bionics or android/robotics ?), Master at Lomonosov Moscow State Uni or Osaka Uni and to crown the efforts with a doctorate at MIT. What I want to do: researching intelligent prosthetics.

    How realistic does this sound? Not very. From my own experience I can tell that you should inform yourself about the basic stuff that you need before you start with the big issue: quantum physics.

    Therefore do NOT buy scientific books about QP before you don't know about the basics. Otherwise it might confuse you and diminish your... dreamers' enthusiasm. Read popular books about it and make yourself clear WHY you want to know about this. Science has its lean times- therefore you need a solid motivator, a reason, why you want to learn about this. And why you really want to b a surgeon. I think you simply love the challenge. nothing wrong with it, though.
    Everything said here is very much true: one would be ignorant to not heed such words.
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    (Original post by Quick-use)
    Everything said here is very much true: one would be ignorant to not heed such words.
    Shutup your faiz
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    Aww you are cute! ^_^ Nothing wrong with being curious about something that sounds as exciting as Quantum Mechanics, especially at such a (relatively) young age .. although you will have the older cynics who have been through the process of trying to get their heads around it, it is quite interesting to read about, even if you can't thoroughly understand the mathematics behind it.
    I think your best bet right now is to read popular books on the topic as many have said before, just to keep your interest up, and ask your teachers at school about text books and things you can read or lectures you can go to regarding the topics you are interested in!
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    (Original post by OkashiAddict)
    Thank you so much! I really appreciate it! + thank you for remaining so positive instead of some others who replied, laughing at me.
    I shall do, your advice has made me remain optimistic! <3
    Hey, I'm enthusiastic about Science and I believe that anyone can be good at it, so long as they're ready to ask questions. Okay, maybe age can play a part as well because of your education lacking in other subjects, but I still think you can use your interest and do well on that.

    Crack on with watching those videos and I'll give you one bit of advice if you want to do well in Science. Always ask questions. A good scientist is one who wants to know about the world around them.
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    Ask your Science teacher about the Large Hard-on Collider at CERN OP
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    (Original post by OkashiAddict)
    Hello. I'm new here but I think this is the perfect place for seeking the advice/info which I much need right now!

    So, I'm 13 and I attend a local school. However, I'm really interested in Science - many aspects! I absolutely LOVE it. I also enjoy Mathematics very much. I'm hoping to become a cardiovascular surgeon - but that's irrelevant.

    What I want to know from you guys is if you think I'll be able to handle Quantum Physics and understand it at this age.
    Also, what do I have to do to be able to understand it?
    Shall I first learn all the basics of physics at my KS3 level? Such as forces, electromagnet spectrum, moments, astronomy, light, sound, ect (I'm pretty familiar with it all already).

    Should I then move onto GCSE stuff - I am 13 and have two years left until I start them.

    And then shall I begin learning out QP? Or, will I be ok with the knowledge I already possess? I dont mean that I want to become a genius and maybe come up with my own theories and stuff. No, no. Just study it and know what it's about and perhaps do some questions and stuff so I can become pretty familiar with it.

    What do you guys suggest? Also, how should I study it? I recently ordered a beginners guide on Quantum Physics. I am currently awaiting its arrival.

    Please do suggest some ideas! Thank you.

    - Misaki. ^_^
    I think that you are amazing. I am also disappointed that you have been given thumbs down. You must have understandably assumed that TSR would have contained some of the most supportive people in your aim. Just because they or most people might not understand, or more importantly try to understand, quantum physics at the age of 13 doesn't mean that you won't- and certainly doesn't mean that you shouldn't try to read about it. Yes, maybe they are concerned that you might end up burnt out at the age of 18 but maybe they are also envious that you might go a long way with this. But don't be afraid to do this on your own terms rather than how other people might want you to progress - show people where your talent lies. Obviously, life will be even easier if you can balance this interest, which is not understood by most relatively dumb humans, with 'everyday' interests too. Best wishes , hope it makes you happy, if you're great at it make some money from it and friends from it.
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    (Original post by OkashiAddict)
    Hello. I'm new here but I think this is the perfect place for seeking the advice/info which I much need right now!

    So, I'm 13 and I attend a local school. However, I'm really interested in Science - many aspects! I absolutely LOVE it. I also enjoy Mathematics very much. I'm hoping to become a cardiovascular surgeon - but that's irrelevant.

    What I want to know from you guys is if you think I'll be able to handle Quantum Physics and understand it at this age.
    Also, what do I have to do to be able to understand it?
    Shall I first learn all the basics of physics at my KS3 level? Such as forces, electromagnet spectrum, moments, astronomy, light, sound, ect (I'm pretty familiar with it all already).

    Should I then move onto GCSE stuff - I am 13 and have two years left until I start them.

    And then shall I begin learning out QP? Or, will I be ok with the knowledge I already possess? I dont mean that I want to become a genius and maybe come up with my own theories and stuff. No, no. Just study it and know what it's about and perhaps do some questions and stuff so I can become pretty familiar with it.

    What do you guys suggest? Also, how should I study it? I recently ordered a beginners guide on Quantum Physics. I am currently awaiting its arrival.

    Please do suggest some ideas! Thank you.

    - Misaki. ^_^
    You sound asian?

    Hi, I'm 14... I recently chose my GCSE subjects and will do them next year...
    If you want to be a Cardiovasular sugeon then you have to be very good at Science, choose Triple Science because most Medical Schools look for that (I've been researching, I want to be a Doctor )

    You sound passionate, don't give up. I had this ambition for a long time and it has really motivated me to study harder which is great since GCSEs are coming.

    REVISE your KS3, Don't go onto GCSEs yet.
    Make sure you become very familiar with every subject, going into GCSEs will just confuse you. Trust me.

    Here's a tip - Don't get too high on your hopes though, you might be very passionate and all that but when you actually do Quantum Physics right now you might give up. [Dream Killer]


    Good Luck
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    Watch some popsci video's

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AHzbKrg2HIw

    Or read some books; ive recently ordered richard feynmans book on QED (like £6 on amazon)
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    (Original post by OkashiAddict)
    Hello. I'm new here but I think this is the perfect place for seeking the advice/info which I much need right now!

    So, I'm 13 and I attend a local school. However, I'm really interested in Science - many aspects! I absolutely LOVE it. I also enjoy Mathematics very much. I'm hoping to become a cardiovascular surgeon - but that's irrelevant.

    What I want to know from you guys is if you think I'll be able to handle Quantum Physics and understand it at this age.
    Also, what do I have to do to be able to understand it?
    Shall I first learn all the basics of physics at my KS3 level? Such as forces, electromagnet spectrum, moments, astronomy, light, sound, ect (I'm pretty familiar with it all already).

    Should I then move onto GCSE stuff - I am 13 and have two years left until I start them.

    And then shall I begin learning out QP? Or, will I be ok with the knowledge I already possess? I dont mean that I want to become a genius and maybe come up with my own theories and stuff. No, no. Just study it and know what it's about and perhaps do some questions and stuff so I can become pretty familiar with it.

    What do you guys suggest? Also, how should I study it? I recently ordered a beginners guide on Quantum Physics. I am currently awaiting its arrival.

    Please do suggest some ideas! Thank you.

    - Misaki. ^_^
    Hello there, I love your enthusiasm and I don't understand why people are giving you such negative responses, also taking in mind you're only 13 - it's rather pathetic! It's great that you know you love science and quantum physics at such an early age and you should definitely explore your interest further. I'd suggest you start reading about the subject more and focus on the areas that really interest you - make sure you enjoy it! Mastering the KS3 level physics and then following the GCSE syllabus would be a good starting point so that you can get to grips with the basics of physics and hopefully then you can read into the concepts and theories explained further (this will really help with your future GCSE exam). If quantum physics interests you over the other areas in physics then keep reading about it while you master the basics and make sure you understand what you are reading about (if not then maybe you are pushing yourself too much!)

    It is then all about reading books, reports and looking into current research and perhaps even coming up with a few ideas of your own. If you get this far and still enjoy it then kudos to you!

    Enjoy your studies and good luck!
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    next week you'll want to be lawyer, trust me

    I went through this phase, I think we all have!
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    I'd like to second Marcus Chown's "Quantum theory cannot hurt you"- a good mathless text and it's not too dense (unlike much of Brian Greene's and Feynmann's stuff).

    Sadly for a more full understanding you're going to need 5 more years of maths but I always found reading about relativity and QM really interesting even if it was only qualitative.

    I'd encourage you to stick at it and ignore all these arseholes trying to put you off. This thread has had some of the most unbelievable snobbery and dickish behaviour i've seen on tsr. (that's a feat).
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    (Original post by Picnic1)
    I think that you are amazing. I am also disappointed that you have been given thumbs down. You must have understandably assumed that TSR would have contained some of the most supportive people in your aim. Just because they or most people might not understand, or more importantly try to understand, quantum physics at the age of 13 doesn't mean that you won't- and certainly doesn't mean that you shouldn't try to read about it. Yes, maybe they are concerned that you might end up burnt out at the age of 18 but maybe they are also envious that you might go a long way with this. But don't be afraid to do this on your own terms rather than how other people might want you to progress - show people where your talent lies. Obviously, life will be even easier if you can balance this interest, which is not understood by most relatively dumb humans, with 'everyday' interests too. Best wishes , hope it makes you happy, if you're great at it make some money from it and friends from it.
    Its because she can't understand it at age 13, not unless shes a Maths prodigy capable of degree level mathematics and with an understanding of basic Physics principles. And reading popsci and knowing some trivia isn't understanding it.

    By all means indulge your interest, keep asking questions and thinking about how the world works. but keep it to general Physics. Going straight into Quantum Mechanics would be like someone who's never swam in their life and doesn't know how going "I'm going to swim the channel by diving off a 50m diving board!" One step at a time or you'll get nowhere.

    Or if not nowhere you'll simply know the names of things and not what they actually are. Sure, you'll know what Heisenberg's uncertainty principle is, but not why its there, where did it come from, what are its implications, how and why does it work. You'll simply be able to regurgitate a laymans definition.

    Don't run before you can walk
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    (Original post by O_Bugger_its_Hitler)
    Aww you are cute! ^_^ Nothing wrong with being curious about something that sounds as exciting as Quantum Mechanics, especially at such a (relatively) young age .. although you will have the older cynics who have been through the process of trying to get their heads around it, it is quite interesting to read about, even if you can't thoroughly understand the mathematics behind it.
    I think your best bet right now is to read popular books on the topic as many have said before, just to keep your interest up, and ask your teachers at school about text books and things you can read or lectures you can go to regarding the topics you are interested in!
    I really like people like you who are so positive and don't tell me I'm too dumb or young! Thank you so much, you really made me smile <3 :')
 
 
 
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