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I don't have a 'passion' for a subject watch

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    Universities are always saying that they want someone who is 'passionate' about the subject that they want to study. I mean, i do enjoy some parts of some subjects, but i don't love any subject as a whole. I don't go home and read up on anything that i found interesting during a lesson.

    The only subject that i enjoy almost every single aspect of is english lit-but i am not good at it.

    What exactly is meant by being 'passionate' about a subject?
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    You sound like me, I try to avoid getting 'pigeon holed' academically. Have you considered doing a joint honours degree?
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    (Original post by Jack.O)
    You sound like me, I try to avoid getting 'pigeon holed' academically. Have you considered doing a joint honours degree?
    Yeah, but the question is: in what?
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    (Original post by Abc1234x)
    Yeah, but the question is: in what?
    Have you ever daydreamed about your ideal job? If so, what was it in? What subjects are you predicted to do best in at school?
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    University isn't compulsory. Why waste three years on something you may not enjoy?
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    (Original post by JKGB)
    Have you ever daydreamed about your ideal job? If so, what was it in? What subjects are you predicted to do best in at school?

    I was thinking of going into law- i mean i have a general interest in it but i am not the type to go home and read tons of books on it- im not that interested in it. The only thing i actually enjoy is english lit..My grades aren't actually that bad- i got an a and and a* at english gcse, but am struggling at a level.
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    (Original post by CapnHooch)
    University isn't compulsory. Why waste three years on something you may not enjoy?
    I know..but i have been bought up to believe that it goes from school to uni. I have never been open to any other alternatives. I don't even know any..well except for apprenticeships, employment..but i dont know how to go about it. The procedure of going to uni just seems the correct way but thats because its the one i have been most familiar with.
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    (Original post by Abc1234x)
    I know..but i have been bought up to believe that it goes from school to uni. I have never been open to any other alternatives. I don't even know any..well except for apprenticeships, employment..but i dont know how to go about it. The procedure of going to uni just seems the correct way but thats because its the one i have been most familiar with.
    No it isn't.

    Go and find the alternatives as opposed to going down the route that is "most familiar". That's not necessarily the best one.

    Why don't you do some research into it? Otherwise you may regret 3 wasted years of your life.
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    It sounds like the American uni system is better for you where you choose whatever major you want after freshman year. Even the Scottish one where you take outside subjects and can change your degree depending on what you took.
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    (Original post by Abc1234x)
    I know..but i have been bought up to believe that it goes from school to uni. I have never been open to any other alternatives. I don't even know any..well except for apprenticeships, employment..but i dont know how to go about it. The procedure of going to uni just seems the correct way but thats because its the one i have been most familiar with.
    This site is helpful when it comes to this sort of stuff.
    Check the Careers forum.
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    If you don't have a passion for the subject then why on earth study it further. University isn't for everyone, despite what schools and colleges etc. may think.
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    (Original post by Abc1234x)
    I was thinking of going into law- i mean i have a general interest in it but i am not the type to go home and read tons of books on it- im not that interested in it. The only thing i actually enjoy is english lit..My grades aren't actually that bad- i got an a and and a* at english gcse, but am struggling at a level.
    If you are thinking of doing Law at a decent university, I would recommend you reverse those words.

    To be a Law student, there is so many expected from you. Ability to argue, write, solve complicated issues e.t.c. Most of the Law students I know at university always face a crazy amount of work to complete including essays & that.

    Please do not pick up Law if you don't have the right attitude for it. It can be a really boring and difficult course as it is really demanding also.

    You don't really seem keen about going to university anyway so I'd advice you to think twice before taking any step/s.
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    I am in a similar situation to you... I like all of my subjects, but I don't feel passionate enough that I really want to study them for three years. You could do a joint honours degree...

    You've just got to make sure the university thinks you're passionate about whatever you end up choosing to do.
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    Surely with the job situation the way it is, you should really be going to university.

    I thought degrees were required more and more now? So ideally, whilst university need not be for everyone, you may be at a disadvantage if you don't go.

    Just do English if it's your favourite subject.

    I wouldn't really have said I had "passion" for any subject tbh.
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    do english if you love english
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    (Original post by *Hakz*)
    If you are thinking of doing Law at a decent university, I would recommend you reverse those words.

    To be a Law student, there is so many expected from you. Ability to argue, write, solve complicated issues e.t.c. Most of the Law students I know at university always face a crazy amount of work to complete including essays & that.

    Please do not pick up Law if you don't have the right attitude for it. It can be a really boring and difficult course as it is really demanding also.

    You don't really seem keen about going to university anyway so I'd advice you to think twice before taking any step/s.
    Well she isn't doing it at university yet... Just because she isn't the type to read lots of books on a subject she isn't even studying (which is perfectly normal) doesn't mean she'd be incapable of reading them if they were required for her degree.
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    (Original post by Jack.O)
    You sound like me, I try to avoid getting 'pigeon holed' academically. Have you considered doing a joint honours degree?
    what does that mean?
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    I know how you feel - I was exactly the same when I was your age. I had no particular interests (academically speaking) at school, so when it came to applying to Uni, I felt that I had to lie about my "passion" for a subject that I really wasn't interested in. That's exactly what I ended up doing. I chose to study what I was good at (which happened to be Maths & Physics) and spent four years doing a degree that I didn't enjoy. Do I regret it? No. University was the best time of my life. I had great fun, made some awesome lifelong friends who I shared some incredible experiences with, and I ended up getting a qualification that helped me land a job with a starting salary of £35k.

    Let me quickly address a couple of misconceptions for you:
    1.) University is not all about studying a subject you're passionate about. It's about a million things more than that. It's about being independent and having loads of great experiences, it's about learning about life and maturing, it's about making friends and forging networks. My degree was only 5% of what I got out of Uni, and I'm glad it was that way.
    2.) You don't have to be passionate about your subject and do it as a pastime activity to achieve good results. I'm probably a good example of this actually... I didn't like Maths or Physics, but I graduated with a 1st class honours degree. I'm not particularly clever either - you just need to do the right amount of work at the right time (i.e. cram in the third term each year before exams) and you can spend the rest of your time having fun.
    3.) Your subject is not necessarily going to define your career. Most graduates end up in jobs that bear little relevance to their degree. The biggest graduate employers are those offering training contracts and they usually employ graduates of any discipline. Many of your peers will end up as accountants, bankers, management consultants, retail managers etc having done nothing relevant to those careers at Uni. The important thing is to make the most of your time at Uni, have fun, and get a good degree. You can worry about work later.

    To finish, I thought I'd tell you the rest of my story. I have now, finally, found a real genuine passion. Having never even considered it at school, I have now returned to University and am studying Medicine as a second degree, which I absolutely love. I feel like it's my true calling and I couldn't be happier to be at Medical School. It's not uncommon for people to find their true passion later on in life, so if you haven't discovered it by age 18, don't worry. Just take things as they come, be flexible, work hard, have fun, and make the most of the opportunities that present themselves. If you want to go to Uni to study a subject you don't enjoy, go for it, maybe it'll take you somewhere you never expected
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    (Original post by Jonty99)
    Well she isn't doing it at university yet... Just because she isn't the type to read lots of books on a subject she isn't even studying (which is perfectly normal) doesn't mean she'd be incapable of reading them if they were required for her degree.

    Well the OP doesn't sound like someone that is really enthusiastic. Doing Law at A'level itself requires a candidate to remember an unbelievable amount of cases.

    If the OP is thinking of picking it up for A'level, she might be able to cope with the AS level. But the A2 is a big jump & I can assure you that with the attitude she has, it would be difficult for her to cope & get a good grade overall.
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    (Original post by Chwirkytheappleboy)
    I know how you feel - I was exactly the same when I was your age. I had no particular interests (academically speaking) at school, so when it came to applying to Uni, I felt that I had to lie about my "passion" for a subject that I really wasn't interested in. That's exactly what I ended up doing. I chose to study what I was good at (which happened to be Maths & Physics) and spent four years doing a degree that I didn't enjoy. Do I regret it? No. University was the best time of my life. I had great fun, made some awesome lifelong friends who I shared some incredible experiences with, and I ended up getting a qualification that helped me land a job with a starting salary of £35k.

    Let me quickly address a couple of misconceptions for you:
    1.) University is not all about studying a subject you're passionate about. It's about a million things more than that. It's about being independent and having loads of great experiences, it's about learning about life and maturing, it's about making friends and forging networks. My degree was only 5% of what I got out of Uni, and I'm glad it was that way.
    2.) You don't have to be passionate about your subject and do it as a pastime activity to achieve good results. I'm probably a good example of this actually... I didn't like Maths or Physics, but I graduated with a 1st class honours degree. I'm not particularly clever either - you just need to do the right amount of work at the right time (i.e. cram in the third term each year before exams) and you can spend the rest of your time having fun.
    3.) Your subject is not necessarily going to define your career. Most graduates end up in jobs that bear little relevance to their degree. The biggest graduate employers are those offering training contracts and they usually employ graduates of any discipline. Many of your peers will end up as accountants, bankers, management consultants, retail managers etc having done nothing relevant to those careers at Uni. The important thing is to make the most of your time at Uni, have fun, and get a good degree. You can worry about work later.

    To finish, I thought I'd tell you the rest of my story. I have now, finally, found a real genuine passion. Having never even considered it at school, I have now returned to University and am studying Medicine as a second degree, which I absolutely love. I feel like it's my true calling and I couldn't be happier to be at Medical School. It's not uncommon for people to find their true passion later on in life, so if you haven't discovered it by age 18, don't worry. Just take things as they come, be flexible, work hard, have fun, and make the most of the opportunities that present themselves. If you want to go to Uni to study a subject you don't enjoy, go for it, maybe it'll take you somewhere you never expected

    Words of wisdom right here mate.

    OP should use this as a stepping stone
 
 
 
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