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I don't have a 'passion' for a subject watch

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    (Original post by Abc1234x)
    I know..but i have been bought up to believe that it goes from school to uni. I have never been open to any other alternatives. I don't even know any..well except for apprenticeships, employment..but i dont know how to go about it. The procedure of going to uni just seems the correct way but thats because its the one i have been most familiar with.
    Totally the wrong reason to be doing it.
    Take some time out, work out what you want to do, rather than taking a place which someone more interested in the subject might otherwise have taken.

    (Original post by tooosh)
    It sounds like the American uni system is better for you where you choose whatever major you want after freshman year. Even the Scottish one where you take outside subjects and can change your degree depending on what you took.
    Not all subjects here are like that.
    Mine is 5-year masters, straight through, all the one thing.

    (Original post by Jonty99)
    Surely with the job situation the way it is, you should really be going to university.

    I thought degrees were required more and more now? So ideally, whilst university need not be for everyone, you may be at a disadvantage if you don't go.
    Good work experience is for many employers just as good as a degree.
    Although again it depends heavily on what you want to do.
    OP needs to decide what they want to pursue, before pursuing it.
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    (Original post by *Hakz*)
    Well the OP doesn't sound like someone that is really enthusiastic. Doing Law at A'level itself requires a candidate to remember an unbelievable amount of cases.

    If the OP is thinking of picking it up for A'level, she might be able to cope with the AS level. But the A2 is a big jump & I can assure you that with the attitude she has, it would be difficult for her to cope & get a good grade overall.
    What attitude though? Her attitude seems pretty normal to me.

    I wouldn't voluntarily read stuff about any of my subjects unless I had to.
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    It, to me, means having a great interest in studying a subject, and wanting to take that study further. Generally, but not always, this reflects in the grades. I'm not passionate about much either tbh, but take English lit as something, and eventually you'll learn to enjoy it more, and develop more of a "passion" for it.
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    (Original post by TShadow383)
    Not all subjects here are like that.
    Mine is 5-year masters, straight through, all the one thing.
    Yeah I read integrated science masters are the exception. But it is true in most cases I believe.
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    I'm not either, I wouldn't worry
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    (Original post by W.H.T)
    what does that mean?
    As in, I don't like to be cornered into one thing, and prefer to be studying multiple subjects at once, mainly because I have very split interests.
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    (Original post by Jonty99)
    What attitude though? Her attitude seems pretty normal to me.

    I wouldn't voluntarily read stuff about any of my subjects unless I had to.
    The OP has no negative attitude. Although she did say that 'she is not the kind of person that will go home and read books'. All I am saying is that If she is planning on doing Law or English Lit, then that statement/attitude needs to be reversed. I study Law and If I had that attitude, I believe my grades won't be good enough.

    I do understand her point of view because not everyone is interested or have a passion for a particular subject. But if they do sacrifice their time particular on one then it would be of benefit to them as they will find it more interesting and will want to do well in it.

    I am going to be doing Economics at university. This time last year I was still having thoughts on what to study at uni but now I have come to that conclusion. And up till now i have no idea of why I have decided on Economics ( i had no passion for it) as it was my weakest course in college that i struggled on. At the end of the day, I looked at the job prospects, course content e.t.c and that was what made my decision.
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    (Original post by Chwirkytheappleboy)
    I know how you feel - I was exactly the same when I was your age. I had no particular interests (academically speaking) at school, so when it came to applying to Uni, I felt that I had to lie about my "passion" for a subject that I really wasn't interested in. That's exactly what I ended up doing. I chose to study what I was good at (which happened to be Maths & Physics) and spent four years doing a degree that I didn't enjoy. Do I regret it? No. University was the best time of my life. I had great fun, made some awesome lifelong friends who I shared some incredible experiences with, and I ended up getting a qualification that helped me land a job with a starting salary of £35k.

    Let me quickly address a couple of misconceptions for you:
    1.) University is not all about studying a subject you're passionate about. It's about a million things more than that. It's about being independent and having loads of great experiences, it's about learning about life and maturing, it's about making friends and forging networks. My degree was only 5% of what I got out of Uni, and I'm glad it was that way.
    2.) You don't have to be passionate about your subject and do it as a pastime activity to achieve good results. I'm probably a good example of this actually... I didn't like Maths or Physics, but I graduated with a 1st class honours degree. I'm not particularly clever either - you just need to do the right amount of work at the right time (i.e. cram in the third term each year before exams) and you can spend the rest of your time having fun.
    3.) Your subject is not necessarily going to define your career. Most graduates end up in jobs that bear little relevance to their degree. The biggest graduate employers are those offering training contracts and they usually employ graduates of any discipline. Many of your peers will end up as accountants, bankers, management consultants, retail managers etc having done nothing relevant to those careers at Uni. The important thing is to make the most of your time at Uni, have fun, and get a good degree. You can worry about work later.

    To finish, I thought I'd tell you the rest of my story. I have now, finally, found a real genuine passion. Having never even considered it at school, I have now returned to University and am studying Medicine as a second degree, which I absolutely love. I feel like it's my true calling and I couldn't be happier to be at Medical School. It's not uncommon for people to find their true passion later on in life, so if you haven't discovered it by age 18, don't worry. Just take things as they come, be flexible, work hard, have fun, and make the most of the opportunities that present themselves. If you want to go to Uni to study a subject you don't enjoy, go for it, maybe it'll take you somewhere you never expected
    but on a scale of 1-10 (with 10 being the most), how would you rate your interest in maths and physics?

    I'm really just asking out of curiousity as I would assume that you must've been interested in it to at least some extent. Also you mentioned that you had no particular academic interest, well is this because you were almost equally interested in all your school subjects or were they equally as boring as each other to you?
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    Even if you have a passion for something, academia can cause you to hate it. Sad but true.

    Well, I dunno. Did you set fire to your pyjamas as a kid or anything?
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    (Original post by W.H.T)
    but on a scale of 1-10 (with 10 being the most), how would you rate your interest in maths and physics? I'm really just asking out of curiousity as I would assume that you must've been interested in it to at least some extent.
    Honestly, for the stuff I was doing at school and Uni: 1.

    I like talking about basic ideas on a conceptual level - i.e. dinnertime conversation about special relativity etc, but when it comes to putting pen to paper, I really hated it. I had no interest in any of the stuff that I actually had to learn in my course.

    Also you mentioned that you had no particular academic interest, well is this because you were almost equally interested in all your school subjects or were they equally as boring as each other to you?
    All equally boring
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    (Original post by Chwirkytheappleboy)
    Honestly, for the stuff I was doing at school and Uni: 1.

    I like talking about basic ideas on a conceptual level - i.e. dinnertime conversation about special relativity etc, but when it comes to putting pen to paper, I really hated it. I had no interest in any of the stuff that I actually had to learn in my course.



    All equally boring
    Have to say, I'm quite surprised.

    But you also mentioned you're loving medicine now, so how comes you didn't find Biology and Chemistry interesting even to a tiny amount? (I mean, medicine isn't just about practising science right? it involves alot of theory learning from biology and chemistry as well?)
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    (Original post by Abc1234x)
    I know..but i have been bought up to believe that it goes from school to uni. I have never been open to any other alternatives. I don't even know any..well except for apprenticeships, employment..but i dont know how to go about it. The procedure of going to uni just seems the correct way but thats because its the one i have been most familiar with.
    You don't know how to go about getting a job? How do you expect to get employed after uni? A mystery employer doesn't just contact you on your graduation day you know
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    (Original post by W.H.T)
    Have to say, I'm quite surprised.

    But you also mentioned you're loving medicine now, so how comes you didn't find Biology and Chemistry interesting even to a tiny amount? (I mean, medicine isn't just about practising science right? it involves alot of theory learning from biology and chemistry as well?)
    That's a very good question. I guess I've started to find bits of it interesting. I have to say I still don't find the details of the chemistry particularly exciting; it's the overall function of the systems which fascinates me. Even so, I still find the less exciting bits pretty tolerable, so I suspect it's mostly because it's applied to Medicine. In A level you would sit there and memorise reactions or whatever, whereas the way we study it now, we're always thinking about what the effects are on the body. Also, I didn't do Biology A level so it's possible I might have enjoyed it had I done so.
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    You don't have to be "passionate" - it is far more important to be motivated. Study what ever you want to study and do it for your own reasons - just because you don't exhibit or feel X or Y opinion or emotion doesn't preclude you from being suitable.
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    It's fine =) At undergrad this is pretty normal anyway. During your course you are likely to find aspects more interesting than others, and might want to study the subject further (say at Masters or PhD level) where you are likely to have a lot more interest in it.
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    (Original post by Abc1234x)
    I was thinking of going into law- i mean i have a general interest in it but i am not the type to go home and read tons of books on it- im not that interested in it. The only thing i actually enjoy is english lit..My grades aren't actually that bad- i got an a and and a* at english gcse, but am struggling at a level.
    Take a gap year and do something different - travelling, volunteering or just finding some full-time work, maybe if need to take a break from education you'll have more room to think about what it is you really want to do, and it doesn't have to be uni.
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    Maybe you should take a gap year in order to have a think about what you want to do? Most degrees do not prepare you for a particular job - a lot of graduate schemes, for example do not state they need a particular degree.

    You could always try and get a job with training within a company - I know that is really easy to say, but they are about - you don't want to end up in a dead end job either.

    I did not go to university right away - I started a job with training (legal) but realised I missed English Literature... am in my first year and love my course more than I thought I would!
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    (Original post by Chwirkytheappleboy)
    I know how you feel - I was exactly the same when I was your age. I had no particular interests (academically speaking) at school, so when it came to applying to Uni, I felt that I had to lie about my "passion" for a subject that I really wasn't interested in. That's exactly what I ended up doing. I chose to study what I was good at (which happened to be Maths & Physics) and spent four years doing a degree that I didn't enjoy. Do I regret it? No. University was the best time of my life. I had great fun, made some awesome lifelong friends who I shared some incredible experiences with, and I ended up getting a qualification that helped me land a job with a starting salary of £35k.

    Let me quickly address a couple of misconceptions for you:
    1.) University is not all about studying a subject you're passionate about. It's about a million things more than that. It's about being independent and having loads of great experiences, it's about learning about life and maturing, it's about making friends and forging networks. My degree was only 5% of what I got out of Uni, and I'm glad it was that way.
    2.) You don't have to be passionate about your subject and do it as a pastime activity to achieve good results. I'm probably a good example of this actually... I didn't like Maths or Physics, but I graduated with a 1st class honours degree. I'm not particularly clever either - you just need to do the right amount of work at the right time (i.e. cram in the third term each year before exams) and you can spend the rest of your time having fun.
    3.) Your subject is not necessarily going to define your career. Most graduates end up in jobs that bear little relevance to their degree. The biggest graduate employers are those offering training contracts and they usually employ graduates of any discipline. Many of your peers will end up as accountants, bankers, management consultants, retail managers etc having done nothing relevant to those careers at Uni. The important thing is to make the most of your time at Uni, have fun, and get a good degree. You can worry about work later.

    To finish, I thought I'd tell you the rest of my story. I have now, finally, found a real genuine passion. Having never even considered it at school, I have now returned to University and am studying Medicine as a second degree, which I absolutely love. I feel like it's my true calling and I couldn't be happier to be at Medical School. It's not uncommon for people to find their true passion later on in life, so if you haven't discovered it by age 18, don't worry. Just take things as they come, be flexible, work hard, have fun, and make the most of the opportunities that present themselves. If you want to go to Uni to study a subject you don't enjoy, go for it, maybe it'll take you somewhere you never expected
    I wanted to rep you for this, but i ran out.
    OP should really take this on board.
 
 
 
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