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    Just buy one of these bad boys :sexface:

    They'll roll it before they can get a considerable distance anyway :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by Emma:-))
    keep your car keys with you at all times
    Not good advice. Always leave keys away from the front door so they can't be 'fished' through the letter box, but easily found once they have gained entry. The last thing you want is to be woken by 2-3 hammer wielding thugs, them all adrenalin'd up, you half asleep, and possibly your partner and kids in the house. Avoid confrontation and let them have the car rather than wind up badly hurt or worse. There have been several people badly hurt during car thefts in recent years as security systems on modern cars require the keys, and thieves will do what is necessary to acquire them. The more the car is worth, the more they will risk. It simply isn't worth it. You could be a black-belt, boxer, ex SAS or whatever, but outnumbered and half asleep you will lose. Better to lose the car.
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    Smear dog crap on the seats.
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    (Original post by warrenpenalver)
    disclocks can be had off in about 10 seconds
    I've not yet met anyone who's had a car stolen with a Disklok fitted. In every test I have ever seen published, whether by Thatcham (UK insurance security testing department), the police, or many magazine publication tests, it has always succeeded for the maximum time duration of the test. As it fully encloses the wheel and is made from very heavy duty thick steel it is very strong and resilient. Maybe you're confusing the Disklok with those Krookloks that used to loop around a pedal and hook over the steering wheel, they are useless.

    What Car Test

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    With my Civic, I don't really care. It'd be a nuisance if it got nicked, but I have no love for the car and I really doubt it would be targetted anyway. It has an immobiliser and if I'm parking it anywhere dodgy, which is not often at all, I put a steering lock on it.

    On my 7, however, I go to mega lengths. Due to the lack of a garage at my house, it spends a lot of time at the moment at my parents house, as it has a safe and importantly, warm-ish and dry garage there. When I DO have it at my house, it's parked on my drive and visible from the road, but it's not visible from the house, so I chain up the axle, have a steering lock, remove one tiny but essential part from under the bonnet and usually block it in with another car. If someone really, really wanted to, they could take it, but the amount of noise and time that'd be involved in doing so would hopefully put people off. They'd have to have a seriously heavy duty pair of bolt cutters and the means of transporting it.
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    (Original post by Walter Ego)
    I've not yet met anyone who's had a car stolen with a Disklok fitted.
    There are many imitations or fakes of the Dislok... some of them look so real it's darn near impossible to tell.... but the cheaper rip-offs can easily be dismantled as opposed to a genuine one.
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    (Original post by Walter Ego)
    I've not yet met anyone who's had a car stolen with a Disklok fitted. In every test I have ever seen published, whether by Thatcham (UK insurance security testing department), the police, or many magazine publication tests, it has always succeeded for the maximum time duration of the test. As it fully encloses the wheel and is made from very heavy duty thick steel it is very strong and resilient. Maybe you're confusing the Disklok with those Krookloks that used to loop around a pedal and hook over the steering wheel, they are useless.
    nope, not confusing the disklok with cheaper copys or inferior hook type locks. I know of 6 people in a relatively small community of car owners who have all had their cars stolen and the disklok was removed with relative ease. Sure they are better than most other products on the market but they still have their weaknesses and on expensive or valuable cars they arent a deterrant for a professional thief. The odd crackhead or teen joyrider, yes they will probably deter them but anyone else will get them off.

    Although to be fair, the theifs did at the same time bypass thatcham cat 1 alarms on all those cars.

    Obviously thats not considering if someone tows/hiabs a car away and they can then cut it off at thier leisure using a grinder.
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    The cheapest way would be, if you park somewhere dodgy, to remove a small but vital part such as the fuse for the fuel pump.

    Alternatively, buy a £2 toggle switch and wire it into the fuel pump or ignition circuit, and mount it in a hidden place, so the car won't be able to be started if you haven't flicked the switch.

    You can also cheaply get electrical switches that require a key to be operated, so you could do the above but your car would need two keys to be driven off
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    It's like being in the 1970's. My Granddad used to remove the rotor arm out of the distributor cap (no longer fitted to modern cars) every night, but thieves then used to carry a selection of those. My Dad wired a switch to the low voltage side of the coil (again, very rare nowadays), and another to the fuel pump, both of which were defeated when his car was stolen. However, thieves nowadays probably don't expect such ancient security measures
 
 
 
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