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What do you think should be done about disruptive students in lessons? watch

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    (Original post by arabcnesbit)
    The parents would take out the loans not the children,or they would go to a charitable school or be home schooled etc



    No it wouldn't.



    The school would damage its reputation if it did this. I think this scenario would be very rare.



    Surely not? They would use our healthcare system for free instead of paying for it abroad? You've just blown my mind!



    You have insurance that pays your bills if you become unemployed. We should have this system instead of benefits.



    Glad one of the worst healthcare systems in the developed world makes you so proud. Not if they take out adequate insurance they wont.



    We've covered this point already. No school will keep badly behaved kids.

    Worst healthcare system in the developed world? Where's the proof or are you just citing your opinion from newspapers?


    http://www.photius.com/rankings/healthranks.html

    UK - 18th. If you look, there are MANY developed countries below us in the rankings. Including USA and Canada.

    France - best healthcare system - 77% of expendutures are paid for by the government. There are some private hospitals(around 30%), but most are public. Costs are moslty reimbursed and people pay a portion of their income straight to the government for health services. Generally France has more charges though for seeing people like GP's where it's around 7 Euros a visit - quite a good idea since it'd cut out hypochondriacs i think ...and reduce government pay to Doctors.

    'No it wouldn't.'
    ...Yes it would...You're not going to know what you want to do when you're older, University or otherwise. People are effectively going to have to pay 'to keep doors open'.

    The school would damage its reputation if it did this. I think this scenario would be very rare.
    What's to stop them? Technically it may be a 'donation' with a silent agreement between parent and headmaster.

    It does happen where private schools don't want to kick children out because their parents are reputable donors. Or because their parents have a high reputation.

    Surely not? They would use our healthcare system for free instead of paying for it abroad? You've just blown my mind!
    Yeah, i was interested about this also. Especially as she's very well of, her Dad is a big name lawyer and was a Mayor of her area (a very posh area outside new york). So i'd assume her family would be able to afford the best insurance etc.
    But she said she would prefer to use the NHS here - apparently support and care is much better.

    You have insurance that pays your bills if you become unemployed. We should have this system instead of benefits.
    I agree this would be much better than the current benefits system - but then i assume those who loose their jobs and have to claim job seekers, arn't the main problems to the benefit system.

    In addition, i'm not sure about the profitability for an insurance company - what about when long-term illnesses occur? Are insurance companies really going to want to accept low amounts of money each month and having to potensially pay out to someone for the rest of their lives? Morgage, Health insurance, living costs, utility bills, transport to and from hospital, child education (if it were private). That's a lot of money to fork out every month!

    Companies just wouldn't really make profit. And i'm assuming this may be why many Americans have to end up selling their homes to afford healthcare and living costs.

    Glad one of the worst healthcare systems in the developed world makes you so proud. Not if they take out adequate insurance they wont.
    How to pay healthcare insurance with no job if it's a long-term illness? Again, this I believe is why people in USA end up selling their houses.

    We've covered this point already. No school will keep badly behaved kids.
    I'm sure some may have too for financial reasons. If you look at a lot of London schools, if they removed all misbehaving kids, they'd be removing half of the school pupils lol. Many kids misbehave until they reach their A level

    Anyway, as most private school insitutions 'seem' to have less behaving pupils (from what i know of anyway, could be wrong) - Parents CAN pay for that priviledge.

    At the end of the day if a kid hates school, there's usually other reasons for it. But lets for the sake of argument say there is not - they hate school, they're bored by school, they misbehave - Having parents pay for their childs Education really isn't going to change the kids perception of education.

    Especially if they see lots of kids not in school and doing their own thing. I mean lets face it, how jealous would you be as a kid if you had a friend who never had to go to school? I'd have been jealous!(until i was maybe 13 and realised how important education is). And I quite liked school.

    Finally - there are 'naughty' school for kids who are constantly expelled or disruptive.
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    I messed around for a lot of Years 10 and 11, I had a hell of a lot of stuff going on at home that I'm not going to bother going into on here because there are many of you who won't even bother trying to understand it, as far as you lot will be concerned, I'm just another idiot trying to disrupt your learning.

    I didn't want to disrupt anyone else's learning, and often went out of my way not to - if people wanted to talk to me in class, I'd talk to them, if they didn't, I wouldn't. I did very little work and yes, there were times when I would chat loudly in class, because it was the only way of blocking out all the **** going on at home, but if anyone had told me to shut up (which they never did, and I was in the top set for everything so this isn't the "doss" classes either), I would have done because I accept it's not fair to ruin other people's education.

    Guess what - I still passed all 13 of my GCSEs. Just because someone messes around, doesn't mean they won't get good grades and are destined to live on benefits - it just means they're better at multitasking than you It's unfair to assume that all people who don't sit there in absolute silence for every single lesson do it purely to upset you. Funnily enough, their life probably doesn't revolve around the "nerd" in the class who, if they really were as clever as they thought they were, would be able to work regardless of the distractions anyway.

    Oh, and it's official. im so academic is Rebecca Black. Plus, it's spelt "I'm so academic"
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    (Original post by GottaLovePhysics! :))
    This has to be inane thing ive ever read on tsr. Get out.
    Lovely. But, let's put it this way; TSR isn't exactly the most exiting, progressive and open minded places is it?

    So er..really, this comment means nothing.

    Howeverrr, please say what was inane about it? OP is suggesting that schools should further tighten up on disruptive kids, when they already take harsh action on those who misbehave, leaving the only nuisances left to be those who just chat and sometimes piss about, but still get the grades. I think it would be ridiculous to expel them, because often they do take education seriously but just approach it in a different way. My school is full of them, people in all my classes talk away, the teachers included. Yet they still do well, I was actually pretty surprised. And I stick to my point that you lot need to loosen up and realize that you can't expect everyone to be as intensely education orientated as you. Also, you need to learn that in the real world colleges aren't going to act in the way you deem appropriate.
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    The ones that tend to piss me off the most are the students with the potential to excel at their subjects. I sometimes shout at some of my friends in my class and I have now analysed and found out that it's the ones that are not going to university or the ones going to much lower ranked universities that disrupt classes.
    Im sure some of us sometimes will feel like punching them but at the end of the day, that's not the way to solve such an issue.

    Some generally f**k about in classrooms and when it comes to exam period and getting results back, they achieve top grades.
    However, I do wish that the process of streaming could be introduced at 6th form/college as this will make it easier for the motivated students to work according to their potential while the less able or sometimes disruptive students will be able to work at their pace.
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    I think the persons situation really needs to be taken into account.
    If they are going through a lot at home for example, or are being bullied or whatever, then they deserve to be given a second chance IMO. Stress and the inability to cope does strange things to people.

    However, if they refuse to take that second chance, or clearly just do not give a ****, then they should be expelled / sent to a PRU.

    Also, I agreed with the "streaming" or "setting" of pupils, although not nesesarily giving the lower classes the crap teachers.

    (Original post by limetang)
    Most teachers SHOULD be able to spot ADHD and Autism etc.
    Well quite often they can't and don't

    (Original post by d4nny)
    These disruptive pupils will end up in prison, on benefits or contributing so little to the economy in taxes that it is by no means worth it.
    While that is true for some, it certainly is not true for all.

    (Original post by d4nny)
    Also, disruptive kids don't change.
    Rubbish.
    If you give them the learning and emotional support some of them need, then some of them do change.
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    (Original post by arabcnesbit)
    Nice try. No I wouldn't. Right to healthcare would also mean forced taxation, hence an abuse of someone else's property rights.
    Okay. Well I believe that healthcare, education etc. are rights too because for me the a right to life is more than a beating heart and a functioning brain. I can see that we disagree.
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    (Original post by d4nny)
    How ignorant! Have you ever even been to Africa or somewhere like that in the developing world? You are so lucky to be born into a country that has one of the best education systems in the world.
    I have been to Africa. However I have not been to all 53 countries inside the African continent. In fact only 1. An irrelevance anyway. Luck has nothing to with it. There isn't some spermosphere rotating around the planet shooting down ejaculate randomly into fertile women. I was either not going to be born or be born in this country.

    I'm sure in my ignorance I ignored the fact many African nations signed up to these rights. So therefore every member of that nation has a right to education. Whether or not they are able to doesn't remove this . I suppose I did misspeak. Privilege and right are not mutually exclusive terms. So it is true in a sense that I am not privileged enough to be able to afford a BMW, I still have the right to buy one. The term privilege can get tricky because whilst an Ethiopian may have the privilege of education they may not be privileged enough to have anything with which to educate themselves.
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    Disruptive students should be removed from lessons. If they can't operate in a 30:1 pupil to teacher ratio then they should be schooled by other means.
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    (Original post by Reml)
    Expulsion - no need to educate people who don't want to be, its a waste of time and is detrimental to others learning
    So when they've got no qualifications and are on JSA, all the hard working people have to support them?

    This is controversial, but I would suggest bringing back corporal punishment.
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    (Original post by im so academic)
    Well you should tbh.
    Again, I'm not disagreeing with you-but this isn't an ideal world and people don't.
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    I'm in 2 minds for this. I mean, I'm thinking back to me in secondary school and I was a disruptive, loud mouthed ***** and by the end of year 9, I had several teachers of optional subjects telling me they didn't want me to continue with their subject :/ Yet, I turned it around in year 10, got back on the right track, started working hard and caring about my work and now I'm at uni. I think if the educational system had of expelled me and told me I wasn't welcome in school any longer, or put me in some school aimed at training pupils for the working world, I wouldn't be where I am now - and that's a shame.

    I realise that not every pupil will be like me, and a lot will not turn it around and will just drop out. But then, we can't ruin the futures of those who might turn it around at the last minute. They are just at school. I think it's different if we're talking about A-level students, but students who are still in compulsory education should be punished as they are doing now. In compulsory education, the majority of us are immature, do stupid stuff and stuff now as adults we facepalm ourselves for.

    My brother is now a problem at secondary school, and I can see what makes him tick. Yelling at him, giving him detention etc. does not work. This just makes him angrier and does not make the teacher's job any easier or make him any less disruptive. And we've told the school how to deal with him; positive reinforcement. Yet the school believes that their failing technique works. I am a strong believer of positive reinforcement, and I think there should be more time and effort spent into these people trying to figure out what it is that they want. Yes, the good people may deem this unfair because they are behaving themselves and more money is going into the disruptive ones. But these people are already getting full benifit from the school, and their education will only improve from the improvements to the "naughty" students.
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    (Original post by SophiaKeuning)
    Lovely. But, let's put it this way; TSR isn't exactly the most exiting, progressive and open minded places is it?

    So er..really, this comment means nothing.

    Howeverrr, please say what was inane about it? OP is suggesting that schools should further tighten up on disruptive kids, when they already take harsh action on those who misbehave, leaving the only nuisances left to be those who just chat and sometimes piss about, but still get the grades. I think it would be ridiculous to expel them, because often they do take education seriously but just approach it in a different way. My school is full of them, people in all my classes talk away, the teachers included. Yet they still do well, I was actually pretty surprised. And I stick to my point that you lot need to loosen up and realize that you can't expect everyone to be as intensely education orientated as you. Also, you need to learn that in the real world colleges aren't going to act in the way you deem appropriate.
    Ok, "You are going to have to learn to deal with people." This has nothing to do with what the OP is proposing. What are you suggesting here? That the OP should deal with these students himself? That this issue is brought on by contempt for otheres..? Elaborate.

    What would you say to the accusation that although these students may get the grades, others who are disrupted do not?
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    Depends what we mean by "disrupting lessons"
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    Why do you all automatically assume disruptive children are poor and stupid? A lot of children are disruptive because they are ahead of everyone else and become bored what do you do with those kids?
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    (Original post by Busby_Babe)
    Why do you all automatically assume disruptive children are poor and stupid? A lot of children are disruptive because they are ahead of everyone else and become bored what do you do with those kids?
    This. At my primary school, I had done most of the year six work by year four. Therefore, for two years I didn't do homework, lazed around and was quite disruptive.

    Not saying I was right-but that your point is completely valid. I'm sure that there are lots like this.
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    (Original post by limetang)
    I was just wondering what your opinions are on this issue, because I'm sure most of us have experienced students who plain and simple aren't interested in learning and so stop everyone else from learning. I mean personally I think if someone doesnt want to learn and has demonstrated this fact they should be taken out of education as they're a detriment to people who want to learn. Although I do see that there may be some issues with this.

    Anyway I was wondering what other students opinions were.
    All the teacher should do is throw them out of the class; I don't see why people don't just do that anyway. In universities you don't really have this problem; you might with freshman classes but by sophomore years (depending on your major) the idiots and/or people who aren't serious are weeded out.

    With the public education system it's obviously a little different and those people "have" to be there, no matter how much we want them to leave. I would like for them to be separated in separate classes where they wouldn't bother the people that are making something of their life.
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    (Original post by d4nny)
    What they need to do is stream them, right from Year 8 (people like this never change) into their own form and should be taught seperately in every subject.
    this is pretty much what it was like the school i went to.
    noone really kicked up much of a fuss in any of my classes, but the lower set there were only the odd few who wanted to learn who complained and got put in a different class.
    there was "isolation" for people who were really bad ( a table and chair set up in this tiny room above the staff room), we're talking throwing chairs that kind of stuff its the step before and after that thing which i cant remember the name of :| where your not allowed into school for a while, a week or few days or something...(my diss is eating my brain )
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    (Original post by Lazylisa)
    I think it depends on the age group really.

    I know the younger years for example Year 1....a simple threat to remove their break from them or their lunch is enough to make them quieten down and listen. If they're persistent in being disruptive them sending them to another class normally does the trick because they come back realising it's best to learn with their class rather than sit at the back of a strange one isolated!
    Yeah i agree.
    With older kids (secondary school age), detentions work for some, but for others they dont- the kids just go to the detention then carry on being naughty again. They should have some sort of punishment in front of the class, it may be a bit embarrassing but at least they wont do it again.
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    My English teacher used to throw things at them (pens, WB markers etc). Worked fairly well, i'd say...
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    I wonder if anyone here has any comprehension of what it's like to teach badly behaved kids. I know I don't but I know two brilliant teachers whom have told me about it. On the outside they may be strong but on the inside it's as tough as hell when you're dealing with trouble makers. Not even the best teachers can help them most of the time.

    So what do you do? Throw them out; expel them? Yeah, because that always works right..
 
 
 
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