Turn on thread page Beta

What do you think should be done about disruptive students in lessons? watch

Announcements
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    ^thats like me in aforesaid English class. Then I just shamed them all by taking out the Top in NZ place for Language... mwahahahha
    Offline

    15
    Line up all the disruptive chavs put them in a cage and let them bang eachother
    BUT DON'T LET THEM OUT! EVER!
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    There were lots of disruptive kids at my school. I don't care if they fail at life themselves, but my GCSE education was severely hindered because of people who couldn't be quiet. The teachers were constantly stopping the lesson to talk to the class, it never worked. Some people do not want to learn no matter what, it's had a knock on effect to this day in many respects... like I say when it starts to hinder me then I object.

    What can be done though? Unfortunately people in the UK are entitled to , nay, it's compulsory, that they attend school under the age of 16. Comprehensive schools are rampant with pupils who don't want to learn... that's If I had the money I would send my kids to a public school even though it goes against my principles. Sigh. I feel sorry for teachers.
    Offline

    15
    I believe they should all be shipped of onto and island to fend for themselves and no outside contact is allowed
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Research shows that 7 out of 10 teachers have considered quitting due to student's bad behaviour. 90% of which felt behaviour had got worse over the years. (2010)
    it's all about behaviourial management. You can't just ostrasize people because they don't do what you want. that's too extreme and hopefully society is a bit more advanced and understanding. What's the point of the Government/charities launching all these iniatitives to help people become better people if the reaction is to exclude them. Exclusion is not on in any form.
    It's about understanding these kids as individuals. They may well have learning disorders, problems at home etc. I am talking mainly from a early years perspective but people are people. Obviously this begs the question, where does the teachers role end? There isn't the time/money/knowledge for this individual approach unfortunately otherwise it would have happened by now. What has to be remembered is that kids are in school for 25% of their time so the discipline has to come from home/friends/the community too. The teachers only have certain influence.
    Research shows that in actual fact fair but strict discipline is the way forward. So critisize the wrongs but praise rights. Discipline through fear tends to inhibit learning. There are several theories for this including one which suggets there are 3 parts to your brain: neo cortex (thinking), limbic (feeling) and reptilian (survival) which can be activated according to the situation the person is in. The theory is, through fear the brain switches from neo cortext to reptilian and therefore the child just shuts down and stops learning.
    The point is, if you exclude poorly behaved students there will be consequences. They wont have the chance to improve and learn which in turn could potentially have harmful effects on society. It's not just about the here and now its about the future too.
    Granted it's hard for those being disrupted in lessons but equally being ignorant about the situation doesnt get results either.
    It's a tricky one!
    Offline

    15
    (Original post by charli_dc1990)
    Research shows that 7 out of 10 teachers have considered quitting due to student's bad behaviour. 90% of which felt behaviour had got worse over the years. (2010)
    it's all about behaviourial management. You can't just ostrasize people because they don't do what you want. that's too extreme and hopefully society is a bit more advanced and understanding. What's the point of the Government/charities launching all these iniatitives to help people become better people if the reaction is to exclude them. Exclusion is not on in any form.
    It's about understanding these kids as individuals. They may well have learning disorders, problems at home etc. I am talking mainly from a early years perspective but people are people. Obviously this begs the question, where does the teachers role end? There isn't the time/money/knowledge for this individual approach unfortunately otherwise it would have happened by now. What has to be remembered is that kids are in school for 25% of their time so the discipline has to come from home/friends/the community too. The teachers only have certain influence.
    Research shows that in actual fact fair but strict discipline is the way forward. So critisize the wrongs but praise rights. Discipline through fear tends to inhibit learning. There are several theories for this including one which suggets there are 3 parts to your brain: neo cortex (thinking), limbic (feeling) and reptilian (survival) which can be activated according to the situation the person is in. The theory is, through fear the brain switches from neo cortext to reptilian and therefore the child just shuts down and stops learning.
    The point is, if you exclude poorly behaved students there will be consequences. They wont have the chance to improve and learn which in turn could potentially have harmful effects on society. It's not just about the here and now its about the future too.
    Granted it's hard for those being disrupted in lessons but equally being ignorant about the situation doesnt get results either.
    It's a tricky one!
    http://recourse.custhelp.com/app/ans...tail/a_id/2278
    Nice lol
    Offline

    13
    (Original post by Gamma)
    I wonder if anyone here has any comprehension of what it's like to teach badly behaved kids. I know I don't but I know two brilliant teachers whom have told me about it. On the outside they may be strong but on the inside it's as tough as hell when you're dealing with trouble makers. Not even the best teachers can help them most of the time.

    So what do you do? Throw them out; expel them? Yeah, because that always works right..
    But their behaviour should in no way be tolerated and if they are not willing to comply then yes, they should be thrown out. It's just a waste of taxpayer's money tbh. Sure they may have problems at home but why harm other people's learning? All you have to do is listen and shut up; I see it for myself, it's sad most people are incapable of doing so.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by im so academic)
    But their behaviour should in no way be tolerated and if they are not willing to comply then yes, they should be thrown out. It's just a waste of taxpayer's money tbh. Sure they may have problems at home but why harm other people's learning? All you have to do is listen and shut up; I see it for myself, it's sad most people are incapable of doing so.
    your a waste of tax payers money.
    im sorry but, you think kicking them out of school will save the tax payer money. your sadly mistaken.
    what do you think theyl do once theyv been kicked out???
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by PonchoKid)
    your a waste of tax payers money.
    im sorry but, you think kicking them out of school will save the tax payer money. your sadly mistaken.
    what do you think theyl do once theyv been kicked out???
    Deal drugs, loiter with intent and waste police time, probably.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by UpsidedownLandMan)
    Deal drugs, loiter with intent and waste police time, probably.
    highly unlikely, but you clearly have that perception so ok then [=

    they are most likely to go on the dole, which oh yeah that wastes the tax payers money as well doesnt it :')

    ahhh you lot make me laugh [=
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    Kick them out of the classes... if they re just too disruptive and won't obey anything, have them take anger management classes, behavioural classes - if they just don't want to co-operate at all then they re just outta there, they don't have to be in school after 16 anyway
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Reml)
    Expulsion - no need to educate people who don't want to be, its a waste of time and is detrimental to others learning

    (Original post by Jacke02)
    if they don't want to learn do they really deserve to live?

    (Original post by zazamak)
    Extreme but very very logical.
    I hate people that are ignorant of this privilege

    (Original post by arabcnesbit)
    Education is a privilege, not a right. If you can't behave yourself like a civilised human being then why should you gain the privilege of education?

    We worry far too much in this society about helping the"poor little darlings" who can't/won't behave themselves. Lets concentrate on helping the people that actually want to help themselves instead.

    (Original post by d4nny)
    A good idea, but schools will not do this as they spend funding right up to what they get for the last pupil.


    What they need to do is stream them, right from Year 8 (people like this never change) into their own form and should be taught seperately in every subject. They should get all of the rubbish teachers, freeing up the good ones for those who want to learn.

    (Original post by im so academic)
    Wait a second, just because you do not understand, it does NOT give you the right to mess about.

    You shut up and ask for help.

    Why the **** should a teacher help someone who misbehaves?
    This thread makes me uncomfortable.

    I have been expelled from 2 institues in my school career due to bad behaviour. I am now about to end my second year of Economics at Edinburgh. Just because we misbehave in school doesn't mean we are unwilling to learn and are stupid. :dontknow: lots of my chav friends who were top of the class and i'd argue brighter as kids to most of the dull kids whose parents waited till they were financially rich and old to have them. But those kids got tutors, books, pushy/understanding/academic/educated/helpful parents. Whilst my friends had junkie parents who were barely adults themeselves, didn't value education, didn't take kids to the museum, didn't encourage academics and swore/got drunk/were asbolic around their kids.

    I know i'm not as brainy as you guys and I know my roots are not good, clean ones - a lot of my family are on benefits, I have relatives behind bars, we live in a coumcil house etc and we aren't the most educated people but we are still human. I came under a special scheme for chavs which allowed me to access higher education, see the bigger picture and hopefully grow up to be educated and bring my kids up not to be disruptive *******s like I was. I'm sorry.

    I know all you on this thread will hate me because i'm demeaning you and it was my kind that 'ruined your learning' but its true. How could I at 7/11/14 know what education could bring me or decide I wanted to behave when I hadn't been taught better? If some small coincidences and events didn't happen in my life, i'd be the type of guy many TSRians talk about 'sterilising' - education changes everything and all of you are advocating to take a disruptive child out of education?

    I feel so **** right now, because i've left my rightful place, to enter a section of society that looks down on who I was born to be.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by pooo)
    This thread makes me uncomfortable.

    I have been expelled from 2 institues in my school career due to bad behaviour. I am now about to end my second year of Economics at Edinburgh. Just because we misbehave in school doesn't mean we are unwilling to learn and are stupid. :dontknow: lots of my chav friends who were top of the class and i'd argue brighter as kids to most of the dull kids whose parents waited till they were financially rich and old to have them. But those kids got tutors, books, pushy/understanding/academic/educated/helpful parents. Whilst my friends had junkie parents who were barely adults themeselves, didn't value education, didn't take kids to the museum, didn't encourage academics and swore/got drunk/were asbolic around their kids.

    I know i'm not as brainy as you guys and I know my roots are not good, clean ones - a lot of my family are on benefits, I have relatives behind bars, we live in a coumcil house etc and we aren't the most educated people but we are still human. I came under a special scheme for chavs which allowed me to access higher education, see the bigger picture and hopefully grow up to be educated and bring my kids up not to be disruptive *******s like I was. I'm sorry.

    I know all you on this thread will hate me because i'm demeaning you and it was my kind that 'ruined your learning' but its true. How could I at 7/11/14 know what education could bring me or decide I wanted to behave when I hadn't been taught better? If some small coincidences and events didn't happen in my life, i'd be the type of guy many TSRians talk about 'sterilising' - education changes everything and all of you are advocating to take a disruptive child out of education?

    I feel so **** right now, because i've left my rightful place, to enter a section of society that looks down on who I was born to be.
    I wasn't being serious lol when u quoted me :P
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Reml)
    Expulsion - no need to educate people who don't want to be, its a waste of time and is detrimental to others learning
    Apart from the whole legal requirement thing
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Jacke02)
    I wasn't being serious lol when u quoted me :P
    Yeah I know, yours was the sarcastic one that jokely reflects how most tsrs think. Sorry for quoting!!
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    It's a decision that needs to be made between funding and access to learning. If we could fund these people to be educated at home until the age of 16, that would be the ideal solution. But we can't. At the same time, you can't stick them all in one remedial class at school (a) because that'll reinforce their self-images as no hopers, and (b) because they'll spur each other on.

    I think it's a problem that needs to be tackled at the root, which is parenting. If all parents supported their children's academic progress and worked with schools to promote it, I don't think these problems would be nearly so severe. There's a side issue that many parents simply set a woeful example of how to behave, and fail to discipline their children properly.
    Offline

    13
    (Original post by pooo)
    This thread makes me uncomfortable.

    I have been expelled from 2 institues in my school career due to bad behaviour. I am now about to end my second year of Economics at Edinburgh. Just because we misbehave in school doesn't mean we are unwilling to learn and are stupid. :dontknow: lots of my chav friends who were top of the class and i'd argue brighter as kids to most of the dull kids whose parents waited till they were financially rich and old to have them. But those kids got tutors, books, pushy/understanding/academic/educated/helpful parents. Whilst my friends had junkie parents who were barely adults themeselves, didn't value education, didn't take kids to the museum, didn't encourage academics and swore/got drunk/were asbolic around their kids.

    I know i'm not as brainy as you guys and I know my roots are not good, clean ones - a lot of my family are on benefits, I have relatives behind bars, we live in a coumcil house etc and we aren't the most educated people but we are still human. I came under a special scheme for chavs which allowed me to access higher education, see the bigger picture and hopefully grow up to be educated and bring my kids up not to be disruptive *******s like I was. I'm sorry.

    I know all you on this thread will hate me because i'm demeaning you and it was my kind that 'ruined your learning' but its true. How could I at 7/11/14 know what education could bring me or decide I wanted to behave when I hadn't been taught better? If some small coincidences and events didn't happen in my life, i'd be the type of guy many TSRians talk about 'sterilising' - education changes everything and all of you are advocating to take a disruptive child out of education?

    I feel so **** right now, because i've left my rightful place, to enter a section of society that looks down on who I was born to be.
    Sorry I'm not falling for this, at the end of the day, you messed about and please, don't blame your as for your actions. Why should the education system take sympathy for people who waste an opportunity?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by im so academic)
    Sorry I'm not falling for this, at the end of the day, you messed about and please, don't blame your as for your actions. Why should the education system take sympathy for people who waste an opportunity?
    Can you blame an 12 year old for not fully realising the opportunity?
    Offline

    13
    (Original post by Jacke02)
    Can you blame an 12 year old for not fully realising the opportunity?
    Yes - 12 year olds are fully aware of the consequences yet still pursue to mess about.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by im so academic)
    Yes - 12 year olds are fully aware of the consequences yet still pursue to mess about.
    Yes if, as 'pooo' mentioned, your brought up in a nurturing environment, so u would know the consequences.

    Anything below a level/GCSE, i found, was boring as ****. I sympathise with anyone who messes about.

    I remember failing my tech (graphics) exam on purpose (well i got a D in tech and 7/8a*s), messing about and doing nothing in class. Tech had no appeal to me, i was rubbish at drawing, the teacher was a prick. Someone with no aspirations of oxbridge like you, someone who never has never exceeded, will not see the opportunity in learning the periodic table.
 
 
 
Poll
Which accompaniment is best?
Useful resources

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.