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What do you think should be done about disruptive students in lessons? watch

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    (Original post by Emaemmaemily)
    Possibly they are given too many chances, but that doesn't mean they should be given no chances at all.

    I've already explained why two people with the same upbringing and education can react differently. I don't need to repeat it.

    No, my argument isn't. We are both arguing our opinions, and nothing more. Yours isn't any more worthy than my own.
    I can validate all my points with necessary sources - any specific ones?

    Of course they should be given chances! BUT there is a limit. And that limit is 3.
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    (Original post by im so academic)
    I can validate all my points with necessary sources - any specific ones?

    Of course they should be given chances! BUT there is a limit. And that limit is 3.
    Well I don't know why you've been arguing when I myself always said there should be a limit. I don't agree with 3, but whatever.

    You can't validate your OPINIONS with sources.
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    (Original post by im so academic)
    Oh come on! If it were as simple as "to give them help" we wouldn't have this problem.

    My God. Don't blame retarded 15 year olds' behaviour on their upbringing and their education. What about themselves?

    Correlation does not equal causation - I take it would fail Statistics tbh.
    Are you actually serious? What makes a person is a mixture of both their genetic makeup and their environment. Obviously, a person’s genetic makeup won’t affect their willingness to learn (much). So that leaves, the environment, the upbringing. If a person is taught to love learning, they will want to learn.
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    (Original post by Emaemmaemily)
    Well I don't know why you've been arguing when I myself always said there should be a limit. I don't agree with 3, but whatever.

    You can't validate your OPINIONS with sources.
    OK, so what do you think the limit should be set at?

    Yes I can. And have done actually.
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    (Original post by IFondledAGibbon)
    Are you actually serious? What makes a person is a mixture of both their genetic makeup and their environment. Obviously, a person’s genetic makeup won’t affect their willingness to learn (much). So that leaves, the environment, the upbringing. If a person is taught to love learning, they will want to learn.
    Or they could resent it. E.g. not everyone who attends a top private school is "passionate about learning". Likewise you could be a **** school yet still want to learn.
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    (Original post by im so academic)
    OK, so what do you think the limit should be set at?

    Yes I can. And have done actually.
    Opinions are subjective, you can't prove it to be 100% right.

    I don't know what the limit should be exactly, but definitely more in my opinion. But hey, let's not go round in circles.
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    They need to be gassed
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    (Original post by Emaemmaemily)
    Opinions are subjective, you can't prove it to be 100% right.

    I don't know what the limit should be exactly, but definitely more in my opinion. But hey, let's not go round in circles.
    Schools are reluctant to remove children from classrooms. Giving them help won't solve the problem, rather excluding them from the classroom does. It is currently hard to exclude a pupil hard out of the classroom - but I believe measures should be taken so it is easier for teachers to exclude disruptive brats outside the classroom.

    http://www.dag.gb.com/documents/Cons...Priorities.pdf

    My opinion - backed up.

    :rolleyes: >3 = too many chances. It's called persistent behaviour. If you were a teacher, I know 100% the students would taken advantage out of your leniency.
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    That programme that was on recently where the kids got sent to some progressive school.
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    (Original post by im so academic)
    Schools are reluctant to remove children from classrooms. Giving them help won't solve the problem, rather excluding them from the classroom does. It is currently hard to exclude a pupil hard out of the classroom - but I believe measures should be taken so it is easier for teachers to exclude disruptive brats outside the classroom.

    http://www.dag.gb.com/documents/Cons...Priorities.pdf

    My opinion - backed up.

    :rolleyes: >3 = too many chances. It's called persistent behaviour. If you were a teacher, I know 100% the students would taken advantage out of your leniency.
    You've gone back a step, we already discussed that.
    That's someone else sharing your opinion... Tories. That doesn't prove your opinion to be right, because I could find something similar with someone else who shares MY opinion, and we could go on forever.

    I wouldn't be a lenient teacher. I would, as I've been discussing, send any child disrupting out of the classroom. It is then up to the appropriate people to sort them out in the appropriate way.
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    (Original post by im so academic)
    Or they could resent it. E.g. not everyone who attends a top private school is "passionate about learning". Likewise you could be a **** school yet still want to learn.
    Yes, but that would be due to some other environmental factor; such as uninterested parents with money (or vice versa). The point is you can’t blame children for not wanting to learn, it’s their upbringing. So we should be addressing the cause of this and giving people alternate options. Not just disregarding them as ‘troublemakers’ and expelling from help of any kind.
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    (Original post by Emaemmaemily)
    You've gone back a step, we already discussed that.
    That's someone else sharing your opinion... Tories. That doesn't prove your opinion to be right, because I could find something similar with someone else who shares MY opinion, and we could go on forever.

    I wouldn't be a lenient teacher. I would, as I've been discussing, send any child disrupting out of the classroom. It is then up to the appropriate people to sort them out in the appropriate way.
    You are contradicting yourself in many ways:

    "Any child who disrupts would be out of the classroom" compared with "3 chances are not enough".

    Wth?
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    (Original post by IFondledAGibbon)
    Yes, but that would be due to some other environmental factor; such as uninterested parents with money (or vice versa). The point is you can’t blame children for not wanting to learn, it’s their upbringing. So we should be addressing the cause of this and giving people alternate options. Not just disregarding them as ‘troublemakers’ and expelling from help of any kind.
    If they are harming other people's education in the process - expel them. We shouldn't tolerate those brats.
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    (Original post by im so academic)
    You are contradicting yourself in many ways:

    "Any child who disrupts would be out of the classroom" compared with "3 chances are not enough".

    Wth?
    This just shows that you haven't read my points at all.
    Yes, you send them out of the classroom... then someone else deals with them, both in a diciplinary way, and in a way that helps them change if necessary. After this they will be allowed back in to behave. If they begin to misbehave again, they will be sent out again.
    This causes next to no disruption of the other children's education.
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    (Original post by Emaemmaemily)
    This just shows that you haven't read my points at all.
    Yes, you send them out of the classroom... then someone else deals with them, both in a diciplinary way, and in a way that helps them change if necessary. After this they will be allowed back in to behave. If they begin to misbehave again, they will be sent out again.
    This causes next to no disruption of the other children's education.
    They refuse to get out of the classroom? Disruption ensues.
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    (Original post by im so academic)
    They refuse to get out of the classroom? Disruption ensues.
    This doesn't happen often, and threatening them with something they will hate usually gets them to move fast. It's quite easy.
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    (Original post by Emaemmaemily)
    This doesn't happen often, and threatening them with something they will hate usually gets them to move fast. It's quite easy.
    :lolwut: You do not even know the reality of the British education system.

    Your ignorance sickens me.
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    (Original post by im so academic)
    :lolwut: You do not even know the reality of the British education system.

    Your ignorance sickens me.
    Yes I do. I work part time as a TA, I see it happen all of the time.
    Stop assumiong you're the only one who's experiences count for anything.
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    (Original post by im so academic)
    If they are harming other people's education in the process - expel them. We shouldn't tolerate those brats.
    And what? Let them fend for themselves, drive them to steal and sell drugs? How about providing alternative options for these people who don't want formal education? Giving people the freedom (as much freedom as you can get in a capitalist state) to choose their own path. A path that will produce productive members of society.

    It’s quite sickening that you would banish people from help just because they don’t conform to your perception of ‘how people should act’.
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    (Original post by Boobies.)
    Not if they do it correctly. All it needs is for a teacher to stop for a minute, tell them to get out
    The only issue with this is what happens when its more than just one kid messing about? You can hardly send half a class outside. I think the best way to deal with it in the long term is to make class sizes smaller, from 30 to 20 instead.

    A lot of the time kids mess around because they either don't understand it or aren't interested in the subject. I think a good way to help these kids would be to seperate them into more practical/career based subjects and maintain the core subjects of maths, English and Science.
 
 
 
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