Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

What do you think should be done about disruptive students in lessons? Watch

    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Hopple)
    If you don't want to learn, then don't - that's fair enough. But to infringe on other children trying to learn is criminal - the desire to learn should be cherished and encouraged to flourish, and anyone against that does not belong in a school.
    oh dear.
    how is it "criminal" then?
    that means i shouldnt be doing the job im doing as i should have a criminal record :O
    SHOCK.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by PonchoKid)
    oh dear.
    how is it "criminal" then?
    that means i shouldnt be doing the job im doing as i should have a criminal record :O
    SHOCK.
    It's their right to an education. They can waive it but can't infringe on others' rights.

    What job do you do?
    Offline

    13
    (Original post by Emaemmaemily)
    We were mostly discussing children aged around 12 though. By 15/16, yeah they should know by them, probably hard to get them to change at that point, but 12 is still quite young.
    So it's easy to just dismiss their behaviour because of some pathetic number?

    Habits will develop. Best to iron them out as early as possible.

    If a ****ing 5 year old can shut up, why can't a 12 year old?
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Hopple)
    It's their right to an education. They can waive it but can't infringe on others' rights.

    What job do you do?
    its everyones right to an education...

    and im training to be a youth worker, im also part of girlguiding UK.

    both of which i need a CRB.

    and due to the statment, im a criminal which means id have a criminal record which would show up on BOTH my CRB's :')
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by PonchoKid)
    its everyones right to an education...
    Exactly, so no one should infringe upon it, though they can waive their own right.

    and im training to be a youth worker, im also part of girlguiding UK.

    both of which i need a CRB.

    and due to the statment, im a criminal which means id have a criminal record which would show up on BOTH my CRB's :')
    Oh, you mean you were a nuisance child at school. You would have stopped doing that if you knew you would be kicked out, as would most of the troublemakers in schools. Besides, haven't you just highlighted yet another flaw in the CRB check rather than in how to deal with classroom pests? Did you still only need a CRB check from the last three years? I did when I went to work in a school, they would have had no idea what crimes I got up to if there were any.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by im so academic)
    So it's easy to just dismiss their behaviour because of some pathetic number?

    Habits will develop. Best to iron them out as early as possible.

    If a ****ing 5 year old can shut up, why can't a 12 year old?
    You don't listen at all.
    I clearly have never said to dismiss the behaviour, I've been saying to DEAL with it!
    And you know the answer to your question, because I've answered it a million times. You sound like a broken record. I answer your question, you ask it again.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by EggmanD)
    SIGH..

    this is the third damn post like this..

    WE ARE TALKING ABOUT CHILDREN. Changing the scenario holds no weight in a mature debate so either address the points i raised or stfu please.
    You're the one making pointless comments; you say that just because something is a natural reaction it is justified-wtf
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Emaemmaemily)
    You don't listen at all.
    I clearly have never said to dismiss the behaviour, I've been saying to DEAL with it!
    And you know the answer to your question, because I've answered it a million times. You sound like a broken record. I answer your question, you ask it again.
    How can you deal with a child that cares more about getting laughs than an education?
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by PendulumBoB)
    How can you deal with a child that cares more about getting laughs than an education?
    Dicipline, dicipline, and possibly some help if required
    Children are children, they're not going to grow up without some help.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Emaemmaemily)
    Dicipline, dicipline, and possibly some help if required
    Children are children, they're not going to grow up without some help.
    How can you force someone to learn; if they don't want to be in school, then don't make them.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by PendulumBoB)
    How can you force someone to learn; if they don't want to be in school, then don't make them.
    Easily if you do it properly :/ How do you not get this?
    They don't want to be in school because they're children and they don't understand the importance of it... More likely than not because of how their parents are. That's not their fault.
    It's the school's responsibility to make them understand the importance of it all and want to learn. Obvously you come to a point that you should give up because it's a waste of time, but they should try first.

    I don't know why you insist on going around in circles.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by PendulumBoB)
    How can you deal with a child that cares more about getting laughs than an education?
    There are far more extensions of bordom than just 'getting laughs'

    Theres no point forcing a child to do something they dont want to do over a reasonable level.

    for example.. i have never used advanced equations or long division since i did gcse maths and i never will.. well if i do then ill ask my mate who has a degree in maths to do it in a second! the subject bored me to tears and i would of happily spent my time doing something else seeing as i can add up my bills, divide them by 4, count my fingers.. figure out percentages or whatever else..

    Im not a developmental psychologist or an education secretary but there has to be a base understanding of subjects as well as a reasonable amount of options to prevent disruption. So called 'disruptive children' should have a decent selection of subjects or topics so they can find something they enjoy and actual disruptive children can be disciplined accordingly as they have issues that stem beyond bordom alone.

    In my old school they have added more GCSE subjects, more one off classes (we only had 'citizenship and reading') and on friday my mates brother who goes there has a day of 'ground working' once a fortnight.. i dont know what he does and i only know its outside..it sure sounds better than my friday as the only thing i looked forward to was the 3.30 bell, just like every school day.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Almost all real solutions to this problem will be deemed unethical. The main problem is that children MIGHT at some stage suddenly realise the error of their ways and want to learn so persecuting their previous behaviour will inevitably have a negative impact on their current situation. This is now wrong as they want to learn and the education is not provided like it is for other children.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by EggmanD)
    There are far more extensions of bordom than just 'getting laughs'

    Theres no point forcing a child to do something they dont want to do over a reasonable level.

    for example.. i have never used advanced equations or long division since i did gcse maths and i never will.. well if i do then ill ask my mate who has a degree in maths to do it in a second! the subject bored me to tears and i would of happily spent my time doing something else seeing as i can add up my bills, divide them by 4, count my fingers.. figure out percentages or whatever else..

    Im not a developmental psychologist or an education secretary but there has to be a base understanding of subjects as well as a reasonable amount of options to prevent disruption. So called 'disruptive children' should have a decent selection of subjects or topics so they can find something they enjoy and actual disruptive children can be disciplined accordingly as they have issues that stem beyond bordom alone.

    In my old school they have added more GCSE subjects, more one off classes (we only had 'citizenship and reading') and on friday my mates brother who goes there has a day of 'ground working' once a fortnight.. i dont know what he does and i only know its outside..it sure sounds better than my friday as the only thing i looked forward to was the 3.30 bell, just like every school day.
    That's my point; you shouldn't have been forced into doing something which you saw as being pointless
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Emaemmaemily)
    Easily if you do it properly :/ How do you not get this?
    They don't want to be in school because they're children and they don't understand the importance of it... More likely than not because of how their parents are. That's not their fault.
    It's the school's responsibility to make them understand the importance of it all and want to learn. Obvously you come to a point that you should give up because it's a waste of time, but they should try first.

    I don't know why you insist on going around in circles.
    If it were that easy, then the behaviour in state schools would be so much better, but it isn't. Also you fail to appreciate the fact that we have limited resources and can't go out of our way to sort out everyones behaviour.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    As is sometimes the case, especially with the young kids it is not entirely their fault if they are being naughty. It may be something that they caught from their parents, siblings.
    I do feel that these sort of students need to be ignored sometimes. But other times they need more attention. No body misbehaves for the sake of it. They probably have some sort of problems and need help. But just juking them out of school is not going to help anyone and not going to be able to advance overall. That student may be very bright and actually enjoy learning but their situation limits them.
    These comments are actually disappointing.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Hopple)
    Exactly, so no one should infringe upon it, though they can waive their own right.



    Oh, you mean you were a nuisance child at school. You would have stopped doing that if you knew you would be kicked out, as would most of the troublemakers in schools. Besides, haven't you just highlighted yet another flaw in the CRB check rather than in how to deal with classroom pests? Did you still only need a CRB check from the last three years? I did when I went to work in a school, they would have had no idea what crimes I got up to if there were any.
    yes i was a troublesome child, and no i didnt stop with the threat of kicked out.
    but as iv said before there were many underlying problems going on...

    the CRB checks are out of date as soon as they are printed, i dont deny that. i think their a waste, especially as im 19 and i have 2...

    what i was saying was if its a criminal record to misbehave, then i wouldnt be able to do anything im doing now, as i would have a criminal record and it would show up on my CRB.....
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    get a african woman standing by with a slipper to beat them
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by flowermaster91)
    get a african woman standing by with a slipper to beat them
    Lol I've thought about just saying "beat them" in this thread for ages :cool: africans know how it is
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Would you rather give up sugar, or salt?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Write a reply...
    Reply
    Hide
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.