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What do you think should be done about disruptive students in lessons? watch

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    (Original post by MissNel)
    This is a really good idea, I just wish more schools would have this idea. As it is most schools give the best teachers to top sets and the poorer ability (and often, but not always, the most disruptive) classes to the poorer teachers. This starts way back in primary school where it is the norm for the Teaching Assistant to work with a low ability group while the teacher is with the rest of the class. The class teacher should always make the effort to work directly with pupils who are struggling even if it is only once a week, every few lessons or something. It gives the pupils confidence as well as them being taught by the most qualified and well trained person.
    Well, I wouldn't say it worked perfectly for my year. Because the better classes got the not so good teachers, they tended to do badly eventually and became quite laid-back. They probably did that so the statistics would even out and not be on the extremes.

    I guess my point is, get better teachers who actually know their stuff AND can teach. I've seen so many teachers with doctorates yet fail to inspire and teach students. But then again, it's not always the teacher's fault. Some kids are just too stubborn.
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    (Original post by ella37)
    Well, I wouldn't say it worked perfectly for my year. Because the better classes got the not so good teachers, they tended to do badly eventually and became quite laid-back. They probably did that so the statistics would even out and not be on the extremes.

    I guess my point is, get better teachers who actually know their stuff AND can teach. I've seen so many teachers with doctorates yet fail to inspire and teach students. But then again, it's not always the teacher's fault. Some kids are just too stubborn.
    Yeah that's a good point. The ideal solution would be for all teachers to be high quality but obviously thats never gonna happen. There are always gonna be the teachers who cannot even control the top set and, like you say, the ones who cannot bring things down to the pupils level even though they're ridiculously smart. My chemistry teacher was like this, knew exactly what he was talking about but couldn't explain it at all and got really annoyed when people didn't understand. The other chemistry teacher was a recently qualified teacher and it was her first year teaching A level but she was fantastic and in the end everyone did much better in her modules.
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    (Original post by EggmanD)
    Sigh..

    First.. we are talking about CHILDREN... not fully developed adults who know what is acceptable and not acceptable in society making your mirrored 'not punishable' and your whole basic 'change the scenario' argument useless.

    Second.. bordom creates disruption because it leads to frustration and anger which are either cured by annoying the teacher/other pupils or released from bullying or fighting. If the child displayed bordom to a certain subject at a certain age (im not a developmental psychologist so i dont know anything about this) they could opt in to do something they enjoy rather than suffer.. of course this should not allow them to do nothing as i did say "Obviously kids need a base learning of certain subjects to communicate, work out basic sums on a day to day basis or to have some idea of how the world we live on works but there needs to be more nurture and reason and less blanket punishment IMO."

    Example.. I have never used advanced equations or long devision in my life since i did maths at GCSE and i dont think ill ever come across more than 5 times when i will and i will probably ask my mate who does maths at uni to do it for me lol.. if i had done something i wanted to in place of something not considered a necessity then maybe i would be on a better path.

    At my old school my mates brother has the option to do something called groundworking which is some outdoor activities/studies **** as well as a greater range of gcse subjects.. including one i enjoyed at a level which is photography.

    In theory this should make pupils at this age less disruptive because those who are only bored will have more options and those pupils who are disruptive because they are brought up by scum and have no manners will be punished because they deserve it.

    This is only an idea and how i feel about this subject.. changing the scenario and ignoring others points is useless, stupid and if anything recessive.
    Well this little event I'm sharing with you happened when I was 13-14 (can't remember the exact age, but it was definatly either 13 or 14, I don't think it matters whether it was 13 or 14 as long as it was one of them, and it certainly was). So unless you are talking about primary school children, my argument is perfectly legit.

    Please don't get me wrong, I agree that forcing people to do maths ect is not a particularly good idea and the system of what subjects students *have* to do should be changed, but that's not the issue here. As of today, people still have to do maths ect for GCSE and sadly its not about to change any time soon.

    Now today as it stands, these people (who rightly or wrongly are forced to do subjects they might not find particularly interesting) should not be allowed to get away with ruining classes for other people, simply because they are "bored", and that should never, ever, EVER be considered a legitimate excuse for it.

    There are plenty of other students who are "bored", but manage to control themselves for the sake of their peers. Those who refuse to do so, MUST be disciplined and if that doesn't work then regrettably they MUST do their work in isolation in an empty room until they CAN control themselves (in my experience a few lessons in a deserted room very quickly made me appreciate how much more interesting having a teacher made the subject).
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    (Original post by ella37)
    Well, I wouldn't say it worked perfectly for my year. Because the better classes got the not so good teachers, they tended to do badly eventually and became quite laid-back. They probably did that so the statistics would even out and not be on the extremes.

    I guess my point is, get better teachers who actually know their stuff AND can teach. I've seen so many teachers with doctorates yet fail to inspire and teach students. But then again, it's not always the teacher's fault. Some kids are just too stubborn.
    I like the view that you put on the teachers; a lot of people put the blame solely on the students without holding the teachers accountable. I just finished my freshman year at the Uni and I have learned a hell of a lot. About the subjects I learned, the people around me, and about life itself. This idea of "bad teachers" becomes much more prevalent at a university as the students there (for the most part) are more serious about their education and there are sites like "rate my professor" that bring this idea forward; that sometimes it's the teachers that fail the students, figuratively and literally of course.
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    (Original post by Jamesey)
    Well this little event I'm sharing with you happened when I was 13-14 (can't remember the exact age, but it was definatly either 13 or 14, I don't think it matters whether it was 13 or 14 as long as it was one of them, and it certainly was). So unless you are talking about primary school children, my argument is perfectly legit.

    Please don't get me wrong, I agree that forcing people to do maths ect is not a particularly good idea and the system of what subjects students *have* to do should be changed, but that's not the issue here. As of today, people still have to do maths ect for GCSE and sadly its not about to change any time soon.

    Now today as it stands, these people (who rightly or wrongly are forced to do subjects they might not find particularly interesting) should not be allowed to get away with ruining classes for other people, simply because they are "bored", and that should never, ever, EVER be considered a legitimate excuse for it.

    There are plenty of other students who are "bored", but manage to control themselves for the sake of their peers. Those who refuse to do so, MUST be disciplined and if that doesn't work then regrettably they MUST do their work in isolation in an empty room until they CAN control themselves (in my experience a few lessons in a deserted room very quickly made me appreciate how much more interesting having a teacher made the subject).
    Most people are bored with their jobs but they tolerate them because it has its gains. If there was a better system to help children envision their future by highlighting how such subjects can help them rather than forcing them to learn i think it would reduce disruptiveness.

    When i was doing long equations and algebra i had no idea what i would use it for therefore i hated it. If i knew it would help with, say Chemistry which i enjoyed i might of focused harder.. Just a thought but i agree that there is a gap between children who are cracking jokes or doodling because they are bored and those who are a serious disruption to others regardless.
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    (Original post by EggmanD)
    Most people are bored with their jobs but they tolerate them because it has its gains. If there was a better system to help children envision their future by highlighting how such subjects can help them rather than forcing them to learn i think it would reduce disruptiveness.
    That's a really good idea. It probably would make things better.
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    haha! to be fair my degree was in early childhood studies so a majoirty of that was taught to me!
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    (Original post by charli_dc1990)
    haha! to be fair my degree was in early childhood studies so a majoirty of that was taught to me!
    Yeah Wow that post is so old I forgot as to why it was funny again :rofl:
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    Every teacher should have one of these in case of disruption

 
 
 
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