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What do you think should be done about disruptive students in lessons? watch

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    (Original post by SophiaKeuning)
    No not at all. But I really doubt anyone's education is severely compromised by a few people in class having a chat. Of course the teacher/lecturer should be able to remove them from the class, but from the college? That's way too harsh. I'm never disrupted by a relaxed, chatty environment-it softens the atmosphere, and can be calming. People need to learn that in the real word, we can't just get rid of what we don't agree with, or what we don't like, people will always be a pain in the arse...
    I think this is a very good point, however we need to clarify between people chatting and people being disruptive. Those people are having a detrimental effect on the learning of others and should be made to face the consequences, something like keeping them in isolation or making them clean the school after hours.
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    Beat them! Beat them with anything, sticks, TVs or smaller children! :mob:
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    Reading this thread makes me glad I go to a grammar school :erm:
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    I would like to make an anecdotal point here.

    When I was doing GCSE maths I was in an apaulling class. There was nothing wrong with the teacher but about 1/2 -2/3 of the class didn't want to learn. The end result was our teacher spending so much time babysitting this class that we never finished all the materiel for the exam. The end result was me getting a B in GCSE maths whereas now being in a new school in a new class that wants to learn I'm getting A*'s at A level.

    So I guess my point is why on earth should disruptive students be tolerated when (as shown by my personal experience) they can cause others to massively underachieve.

    So for people saying a few disruptive students doesnt really harm anyone else my answer is that it does, it massively harms others education and that's not fair.
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    They should be taken out of the class as it's unfair to those who do actually want to learn something.
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    (Original post by im so academic)
    What if the teachers regularly check if you need help, but you say you don't, even though you do?

    What if they're willing to help, but you're not able to?



    Excuse me?! It is their fault. Who misbehaves? Oh, the child. I'm personally disgusted by your answer. Do NOT blame your misbehaviour on family problems.

    There are kids all over the world who experience even worse **** than "friendship issues", and they bloody respect their education.



    But if those kids aren't willing to be worked with, and not willing to co-operate, then yes, ****ing expel them. Children these days are given too many chances.



    You don't get excluded for no reason.

    Act like a little ****, receive the consequences.

    How difficult is it to button it and work?

    I think a lot of what you're saying is based on personal opinion, i haven't gone through all your posts but from what i gather you go to private school and are fairly well off (apologies if this is wrong or w/e) the kids we're talking about live in impoverished areas with high levels of crime and drug abuse. it's not simply a case of ignoring them and putting them out of sight. These people need help and encouragement, with specialized support staff, not to have opinionated girls rant about them.
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    (Original post by medbh4805)
    Reading this thread makes me glad I go to a grammar school :erm:
    Same! But it still happens at grammar school. Teachers often question how some got through the 11+ with the intelligent pupils! One publically asked a disruptive kid if he had slipped a tenner in his test paper. He's gone now...
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    (Original post by Boobies.)
    I'm sorry but why the hell should my education be compromised because people can't shut up and respect the teacher? You must be one of the people who think it is acceptable to gossip about your boyfriend consistently through lessons.

    In my opinion, in high school and onwards, teachers should be able to remove a child or a teenager at college from a class and for them to be exempt from the rest of that class, using force if necessary. If the problem persists, expulsion is a viable option.
    Wherever you go, you are going to get people that mess around. Learn to deal with it.
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    If you are that much bothered about 1 child and can't get over it, then just go to a public school!!!!

    State schools will always have those kids that dont want to learn, especially at GCSE and below...but to be honest, ignore them, it is very easy, dont pay attention to the idiots, they will get bored, very very simple psychology...

    And those 'top performers' that dont like the idiots, get over it, you're clever, its GCSE, you can do the exams with a few weeks, even days of reading the books....
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    It's a bit of a conundrum really a question like this. I've seen pupils with such terrible behaviour in one lesson go into the next period and be good as gold. I think in the end it comes down to the teacher. Some teachers can adapt and make the lesson engaging and interesting for all whereas others, who may not necessarily be bad teachers per se, prefer to teach in their comfort zone which may or may not be appealing to all students.

    It's a tough line to walk as you can end up alienating those who want to learn and those who don't if you stray either side.
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    (Original post by d4nny)
    Same! But it still happens at grammar school. Teachers often question how some got through the 11+ with the intelligent pupils! One publically asked a disruptive kid if he had slipped a tenner in his test paper. He's gone now...
    yeh, there were a few disrupters, most of them didn't meet the entry requirements for sixth form so had to leave after 5th year :erm: To be honest, a lot of them (not all) were absolutely horrible girls who treated everyone in the school, not just teachers, like ****.

    I don't get why people are talking about students being "failed" by the system. yes the school has a pastoral care duty to the student but there comes a point where the student has to start taking responsibility for their own actions.

    I don't have the patience for such people. Most of the people in my school are on EMA, a fair proportion get FSM and I have a number of friends who have serious problems at home. however they all work hard and want to be here. Good manners cost nothing and I wouldn't tolerate someone treating me with no respect no matter what their social background. So why should the teacher?
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    (Original post by im so academic)
    You're saying that an overwhelming *majority* of children have those disorders? Bull****.

    Then they should ask for help. How would the school and others ever know?

    Again, doesn't give them the right to harm other people's education. Look at countries where children experience EVEN WORSE than people in here - they respect their education.

    Excuse me? It's bloody obvious why education is important. If you can't see the benefits of an education, then tough.

    Right, you're expecting overworked teachers to tailor their lessons to 12 different types of learning and what not? Every child can listen...

    Good luck with that!

    Excuse me? The school is not to blame, the child is. In fact, it is currently VERY HARD to permanently exclude a pupil.

    Better to expel one and it is detrimental to one person's future; than to let that kid stay in school and hinder the education of many.

    Trust me, before a pupil can even be suggested for expulsion, they have many, MANY chances.
    Have you ever done teacher training - or even worked with children? I've done both - and yes, the VAST majority of challenging behaviour is caused by some sort of problem. Not ALL children can listen. Noone is bad for the sake of it. Clearly you've never had to cope with difficult life situations either - it isn't as simple as simply telling someone, especially not if you are a child.
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    (Original post by Tara_Ward)
    ...These people need help and encouragement, with specialized support staff...
    You support staff people (not just you) have to get out of your fantasy world where everything is free. Support staff, taylored education, etc. costs money! Too much for someone who will just end up in prison or on benefits.
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    (Original post by Tara_Ward)
    I think a lot of what you're saying is based on personal opinion, i haven't gone through all your posts but from what i gather you go to private school and are fairly well off (apologies if this is wrong or w/e) the kids we're talking about live in impoverished areas with high levels of crime and drug abuse. it's not simply a case of ignoring them and putting them out of sight. These people need help and encouragement, with specialized support staff, not to have opinionated girls rant about them.
    Private Messaged you. Please read.
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    (Original post by LiamTheKook)
    It's a bit of a conundrum really a question like this. I've seen pupils with such terrible behaviour in one lesson go into the next period and be good as gold. I think in the end it comes down to the teacher. Some teachers can adapt and make the lesson engaging and interesting for all whereas others, who may not necessarily be bad teachers per se, prefer to teach in their comfort zone which may or may not be appealing to all students.

    It's a tough line to walk as you can end up alienating those who want to learn and those who don't if you stray either side.
    I agree with this, there were teachers who you just didn't misbehave in front of. These teachers had a lot of respect from all pupils and teachers alike.

    I went to a Grammar school, but only in the title. It hadn't been a Grammar school for 200 years, it was part of an education authority in the bottom 5 of the country. The amount of drugs dealt in lessons and miss-behaviour that went on in certain lessons was a joke. Several of the less respected teachers were repeatedly locked in cupboards and storerooms time and time again because they were too frightened to discipline the class (or remember to not leave the key on the outside of the door). Some of the children acted in a sickening way, 14 year olds acting like animals. Yet stick a certain teacher in front of them and suddenly they'd be sat wide eyed paying attention.

    I have an enormous amount of respect for teachers, but only ones who entice their pupils into learning by having dynamic lessons but also keeping an eye out for those who are struggling. Those who continuously get themselves locked in cupboards, I have no respect for.
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    (Original post by SteveBwfc)
    If you are that much bothered about 1 child and can't get over it, then just go to a public school!!!!

    State schools will always have those kids that dont want to learn, especially at GCSE and below...but to be honest, ignore them, it is very easy, dont pay attention to the idiots, they will get bored, very very simple psychology...

    And those 'top performers' that dont like the idiots, get over it, you're clever, its GCSE, you can do the exams with a few weeks, even days of reading the books....
    Arguably hours?
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    (Original post by medbh4805)
    yeh, there were a few disrupters, most of them didn't meet the entry requirements for sixth form so had to leave after 5th year :erm: To be honest, a lot of them (not all) were absolutely horrible girls who treated everyone in the school, not just teachers, like ****.

    I don't get why people are talking about students being "failed" by the system. yes the school has a pastoral care duty to the student but there comes a point where the student has to start taking responsibility for their own actions.

    I don't have the patience for such people. Most of the people in my school are on EMA, a fair proportion get FSM and I have a number of friends who have serious problems at home. however they all work hard and want to be here. Good manners cost nothing and I wouldn't tolerate someone treating me with no respect no matter what their social background. So why should the teacher?
    Agree with you, but to be fair to the teacher, the pupil was an absolute scumbag who often skived, didn't work and gave the teacher way too much lip. He was the old type (my favourite!) who called pupils by their surname and was trained to teach with caning and without political correctness.
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    ignore them ? ...
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    (Original post by d4nny)
    You support staff people (not just you) have to get out of your fantasy world where everything is free. Support staff, taylored education, etc. costs money! Too much for someone who will just end up in prison or on benefits.
    Sometimes it doesn't even work.
 
 
 
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