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    Hi,

    i have a lot of extra curricular activities including:
    Brazilian jiu jitsu
    Boxing
    Wrestling
    Piano
    *volunteering at imperial hospital

    gcses;
    chem-a
    bio-b
    phy-b
    eng lit-b
    eng lang-b
    history-b
    maths-b

    and if i get AAA in biology, chemistry and history for as will i have a chance?
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    (Original post by adeel17)
    Hi,

    i have a lot of extra curricular activities including:
    Brazilian jiu jitsu
    Boxing
    Wrestling
    Piano

    gcses;
    chem-a
    bio-b
    phy-b
    eng lit-b
    eng lang-b
    history-b
    maths-b

    and if i get AAA in biology, chemistry and history for as will i have a chance?
    If you get AAA predictions for A2, then academically you have a chance.
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    Not trying to be negative, but why would they care that you're a good wrestler or play the piano? Don't you think that they'd be much more interested in you having work experience actually relevant to your course? I.E pharmaceutical/chemistry/volunteer work/ scientific work experience...how is the fact that you play the piano going to make you a better doctor than someone who doesnt? Second of all, why have you only done 3 A/S levels? Your GCSE's are less than stellar for a medical student and you'll be immediately dissadvantaged, most people do 4 A/S and the most academically able (I.E the ones who most likely could be doctors) do 5 or 6. There'll probably be about 8 people at least applying for your place at UCL and what exactly have you done to make them think "we want this guy on our course"?
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    (Original post by adeel17)
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    (Original post by hockeyjoe)
    Not trying to be negative, but why would they care that you're a good wrestler or play the piano? Don't you think that they'd be much more interested in you having work experience actually relevant to your course? I.E pharmaceutical/chemistry/volunteer work/ scientific work experience...how is the fact that you play the piano going to make you a better doctor than someone who doesnt? Second of all, why have you only done 3 A/S levels? Your GCSE's are less than stellar for a medical student and you'll be immediately dissadvantaged, most people do 4 A/S and the most academically able (I.E the ones who most likely could be doctors) do 5 or 6. There'll probably be about 8 people at least applying for your place at UCL and what exactly have you done to make them think "we want this guy on our course"?
    For Medicine @ UCL, one of the factors taken into account when deciding which applicants to interview is other interests, including music and sports. Furthermore, at the interview stage, the interviewers will be scoring your individual strengths, e.g. musical or sporting. Therefore wrestling and playing the piano will be advantageous.

    However, it is true that doing more relevant work experience would be very useful for your application, since it seems you have only had one. More than anything though, make sure that you are able to reflect upon your experience.
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    (Original post by adeel17)
    Hi,

    i have a lot of extra curricular activities including:
    Brazilian jiu jitsu
    Boxing
    Wrestling
    Piano
    *volunteering at imperial hospital

    gcses;
    chem-a
    bio-b
    phy-b
    eng lit-b
    eng lang-b
    history-b
    maths-b

    and if i get AAA in biology, chemistry and history for as will i have a chance?
    If you get/are predicted a minimum of AAA you have a chance. An A* would make your chances quite definite.

    For medicine, you need to do well in the BMAT. If you get 5, 5, 2.5C, in the BMAT you'll definitely get an interview, otherwise you'll get rejected (your academics aren't very strong at all, others will get preferences if there are any spaces left, realistically).

    In short, you're much more likely to get in to Biochemistry than Medicine, but who knows ~ if you do really well in the BMAT, you've got a good short (don't forget you need a good reference; work experience etc. for medicine).

    EDIT: You should do 4 AS Levels, like everyone else, in my opinion. Your chances will probably decrease, otherwise.
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    (Original post by hockeyjoe)
    Not trying to be negative, but why would they care that you're a good wrestler or play the piano? Don't you think that they'd be much more interested in you having work experience actually relevant to your course? I.E pharmaceutical/chemistry/volunteer work/ scientific work experience...how is the fact that you play the piano going to make you a better doctor than someone who doesnt? Second of all, why have you only done 3 A/S levels? Your GCSE's are less than stellar for a medical student and you'll be immediately dissadvantaged, most people do 4 A/S and the most academically able (I.E the ones who most likely could be doctors) do 5 or 6. There'll probably be about 8 people at least applying for your place at UCL and what exactly have you done to make them think "we want this guy on our course"?
    Total *******s. Most med schools go to the extent of disregarding any extra A2 or AS. Some medschools don't even require a 4th AS.
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    (Original post by adeel17)
    Hi,

    i have a lot of extra curricular activities including:
    Brazilian jiu jitsu
    Boxing
    Wrestling
    Piano
    *volunteering at imperial hospital

    gcses;
    chem-a
    bio-b
    phy-b
    eng lit-b
    eng lang-b
    history-b
    maths-b

    and if i get AAA in biology, chemistry and history for as will i have a chance?
    For entry into a top uni, EC's don't really hold any weight unless they are directly related to the degree's subject(s). In your case that would be medicine/biochem e.g. working in a hospital (I see you're doing that though which is good). You only have 7 GCSE's and those grades are relatively poor. You also haven't done a foreign language GCSE so you won't be considered for entry by UCL (all applicants aree required to have at least passed a modern foreign language at GCSE). And I'm pretty sure Maths is a required A-level...

    In other words, you have no chance of entry into UCL for Medicine or Biochem. These are extremely competitive courses and you don't even fulfill the entry requirements. To put it into perspective, my friend with 7A*'s 4A's at GCSE, A's at AS-level and predicted A*'s at A-level got a straight rejection from them.
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    (Original post by Straight up G)
    Total *******s. Most med schools go to the extent of disregarding any extra A2 or AS. Some medschools don't even require a 4th AS.
    Oh open your eyes will you mate, medicine is one of the most work intensive courses you can possibly do, who's better prepared for it, the student who's worked really hard to get A's in four or five subjects or the student whose coasted and gotten A's in three subjects? Universities aren't gonna be interested in anything apart from your drive to succeed, how good a doctor your going to make, and how likely you are to get a 1st, the best way to illustrate that is to get some solid grades in solid subjects and get some good work experience, this shows you have the brains, drive and work ethic to succeed in medicine, which is what they want at the end of the day isnt it. I'm sorry but doing three A/S levels just shows that your too weak a candidate, and look at the GCSE's for god sake, those are average at best and the OP asked the question "do i have a chance" baring in mind here they're talking about UCL, one of the best in the country, no he doesnt have a chance.
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    For 2012 entry UCL require a modern foreign language at GCSEs..
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    (Original post by hockeyjoe)
    Oh open your eyes will you mate, medicine is one of the most work intensive courses you can possibly do, who's better prepared for it, the student who's worked really hard to get A's in four or five subjects or the student whose coasted and gotten A's in three subjects? Universities aren't gonna be interested in anything apart from your drive to succeed, how good a doctor your going to make, and how likely you are to get a 1st, the best way to illustrate that is to get some solid grades in solid subjects and get some good work experience, this shows you have the brains, drive and work ethic to succeed in medicine, which is what they want at the end of the day isnt it. I'm sorry but doing three A/S levels just shows that your too weak a candidate, and look at the GCSE's for god sake, those are average at best and the OP asked the question "do i have a chance" baring in mind here they're talking about UCL, one of the best in the country, no he doesnt have a chance.
    Actually mate, you've got it wrong.

    Entry requirements for grades are usually just screening/shortlisting exercises. After a point, they become irrelevant, and so if a med school says they don't care about extra AS's, and you get As in all of the relevant exams, the chances are you will have another box ticked, and will be put through to the next round/next tickboxing session, where they will look at your UKcat, your PS, your reference, and then your interview performance. Many, if not most med schools just see grades as a tick box. If a med school says they only need 3AS levels, then they will definitely accept people with 3AS levels, and people would only be slightly at an advantage if they did more.

    You don't get a first, 2i or any other form of normal classification in medicine. It's a straight pass or fail. Some courses give 'Hons' (I think it has something to do intercalation etc) but its not common, at the end of the day you get a straight MBChB, MBBS etc.

    I didn't say anything about work experience, motivation to exceed or anything like that, (many candidates score highly on these things and not so well on grades(. I merely pointed out that you were wrong about medical students doing extra AS levels, because for the vast majority of medical schools, it's barely advantageous. If you were applying to Cambridge, of course, doing the Big 5 would mean that you were not at a disadvantage, but that is the exception rather than the rule. Doing brilliantly well in exams does not always shown a motivation to exceed, med schools look at motivation through one's PS not their academic abilities. A lot of Med applicants will just be naturally talented, will ace exams with ease, and yet they may have no motivation to do medicine. It is the personal statement and interviews that show your drive and desire, not your grades.

    OP has a miniscule chance at best, virtually brought down to 0 by his lack of MFL, but you just started going on about something you clearly don't know about.
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    (Original post by oHellno)
    For 2012 entry UCL require a modern foreign language at GCSEs..
    Would I be able to get in, if I get a C in a a GCSE in foreign Language, will UCL still consider me?
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    (Original post by hockeyjoe)
    Oh open your eyes will you mate, medicine is one of the most work intensive courses you can possibly do, who's better prepared for it, the student who's worked really hard to get A's in four or five subjects or the student whose coasted and gotten A's in three subjects? Universities aren't gonna be interested in anything apart from your drive to succeed, how good a doctor your going to make, and how likely you are to get a 1st, the best way to illustrate that is to get some solid grades in solid subjects and get some good work experience, this shows you have the brains, drive and work ethic to succeed in medicine, which is what they want at the end of the day isnt it. I'm sorry but doing three A/S levels just shows that your too weak a candidate, and look at the GCSE's for god sake, those are average at best and the OP asked the question "do i have a chance" baring in mind here they're talking about UCL, one of the best in the country, no he doesnt have a chance.
    You are talking rubbish. A Levels do not predict how good a doctor someone will be.

    You can't get 1sts in medical degrees - they are unclassified.

    4 As levels, and 3 A2 levels are perfectly fine for medicine - I did and I got 4 interviews, and I know of many who didn't do more than 4.
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    (Original post by Markh1000)
    You are talking rubbish. A Levels do not predict how good a doctor someone will be.

    You can't get 1sts in medical degrees - they are unclassified.

    4 As levels, and 3 A2 levels are perfectly fine for medicine - I did and I got 4 interviews, and I know of many who didn't do more than 4.
    do you know how long ago i posted that? and if you can be arsed to read the whole thread from the beginning, then you can be arsed to read how many other users have slaughtered me for saying that, you dont need to add your 2 cents by saying the exact same thing like ten other people have so **** off
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    (Original post by notepad)
    If you get/are predicted a minimum of AAA you have a chance. An A* would make your chances quite definite.

    For medicine, you need to do well in the BMAT. If you get 5, 5, 2.5C, in the BMAT you'll definitely get an interview, otherwise you'll get rejected (your academics aren't very strong at all, others will get preferences if there are any spaces left, realistically).

    In short, you're much more likely to get in to Biochemistry than Medicine, but who knows ~ if you do really well in the BMAT, you've got a good short (don't forget you need a good reference; work experience etc. for medicine).

    EDIT: You should do 4 AS Levels, like everyone else, in my opinion. Your chances will probably decrease, otherwise.
    I don't think anyone has definite chances no matter who you are.
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    I have a place at UCL. Your application looks good, but every year they reject great students so it's not guaranteed.
    Grades are important to get their attention, but the contents of your PS are the clincher.
    They care a LOT about work experience and volunteering and the like. By the time interview comes around, they will have already decided they like you academically, so you can wow them with the extras. Best of luck and don't become a UCAS whore (doing all sorts of nonsense just to put in in you PS/Ucas Form)

    Also not too much BS in your PS :P

    ETA: Ace your BMAT, because they use it prominently in the process of shortlisting for interview
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    (Original post by therealOG)
    For entry into a top uni, EC's don't really hold any weight unless they are directly related to the degree's subject(s). In your case that would be medicine/biochem e.g. working in a hospital No, This isn't true.(I see you're doing that though which is good). You only have 7 GCSE's and those grades are relatively poor. You also haven't done a foreign language GCSE so you won't be considered for entry by UCL (all applicants aree required to have at least passed a modern foreign language at GCSE).Yes this is true. But only for MEDICINE. But weak GCSE's can be balanced out with an outstanding BMAT, PS and A level. And I'm pretty sure Maths is a required A-level...NO. Tshis is definitely not true.

    In other words, you have no chance of entry into UCL for Medicine or Biochem. You don't know that for sure about Biochem. I think OP might have a very good shot there.These are extremely competitive courses and you don't even fulfill the entry requirements. To put it into perspective, my friend with 7A*'s 4A's at GCSE, A's at AS-level and predicted A*'s at A-level got a straight rejection from them.That literally means nothing.
    This is an example of the danger that TSR can present to prospective medics. Information that just isn't true.
    It's to good to give advice but the right advice needs to be given.
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    (Original post by hockeyjoe)
    do you know how long ago i posted that? and if you can be arsed to read the whole thread from the beginning, then you can be arsed to read how many other users have slaughtered me for saying that, you dont need to add your 2 cents by saying the exact same thing like ten other people have so **** off
    Well people giving **** uniformed advice is far too common.

    I hadn't noticed the date, but a month is hardly that long, and I wasn't the one who bumped the thread.
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    The thing is, someone who coasted through A levels has far far more reserve ability in the tank that hasn't been used yet. Oh and the chances of success if you don't apply are 0%.
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    (Original post by Aku-gila)
    For Medicine @ UCL, one of the factors taken into account when deciding which applicants to interview is other interests, including music and sports. Furthermore, at the interview stage, the interviewers will be scoring your individual strengths, e.g. musical or sporting. Therefore wrestling and playing the piano will be advantageous.

    However, it is true that doing more relevant work experience would be very useful for your application, since it seems you have only had one. More than anything though, make sure that you are able to reflect upon your experience.
    I'm untalented in terms of music and sports, but I love drawing and am quite good at it, would that still count?
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    Its so annoying when people apply for biochem at unis incase they don't get into med when they know they aren't going to do biomed if they get four rejections, just takes up peoples places who actually want to do the biochem/med.
 
 
 
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