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    I need help big style!!
    I dont have a clue how to set out my coursework etc so if anybody has a template or any relevant notes etc I would be grateful!
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    (Original post by ClaretDingle92)
    I need help big style!!
    I dont have a clue how to set out my coursework etc so if anybody has a template or any relevant notes etc I would be grateful!
    What exam board are you on? What's your question?
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    Edexcel- In considering the political development of Ireland in the years 1890-1990, how far would you consider Easter Rebellion to be the key turning point in Anglo-Irish relations?
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    (Original post by ClaretDingle92)
    Edexcel- In considering the political development of Ireland in the years 1890-1990, how far would you consider Easter Rebellion to be the key turning point in Anglo-Irish relations?
    oooh different exam board to me, that's a shame If I was doing that question, I'd probably first consider why the Easter Rebellion was a turning point. Then, I would probably discuss why other events could be argued to be the turning point. Then probably conclude by saying how far the Easter Rebellion was the turning pt and if it wasn't, what was. It would probably be a good idea to get in a good chronological range of events-we're being advised to do this.

    Can't really say much beyond this, cos different exam boards are after different things.
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    before that the IPP was happy to settle for home rule which involved dominion status. After 1916 and the brutal reaction people were radicalised, the IPP went into decline and sinn fein were the popular nationalist party clearly winning the 1918 general election. the want for a republic which was a minority desire was now mainstream among nationalists. Relationships broke down and the anglo irish war between the dail government and the british government ensued in 1921.
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    Which would you say is the key turning point, Easter Rebellion, Anglo-Irish treaty or Bloody Sunday?
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    (Original post by ClaretDingle92)
    Which would you say is the key turning point, Easter Rebellion, Anglo-Irish treaty or Bloody Sunday?
    for me the easter rising and many historians can be quoted to back that up but you also have to look at historians who believe otherwise.

    You normally have to quote to get replies
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    I did this question kinda, we had what was the greatest point out of easter rising, bloody sunday and the deployment of British troops..... My teacher told me to do the deployment of British troops because it was the hardest i got full marks for my couursework in the end
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    (Original post by ClaretDingle92)
    Which would you say is the key turning point, Easter Rebellion, Anglo-Irish treaty or Bloody Sunday?
    Turning point in what exactly?
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    (Original post by Jack-Jimmison)
    I did this question kinda, we had what was the greatest point out of easter rising, bloody sunday and the deployment of British troops..... My teacher told me to do the deployment of British troops because it was the hardest i got full marks for my couursework in the end
    God forbid if you pointed out the British troops actually came to Northern ireland to protect the Nationalist community. No Republican would want you to acknowledge that.
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    (Original post by Daniel1987)
    God forbid if you pointed out the British troops actually came to Northern ireland to protect the Nationalist community. No Republican would want you to acknowledge that.


    I would have thought the person was referring to the deployment of the Auxiliaries and Black and Tans, who were not protecting anyone.

    Strange to see it written as the Easter Rebellion. We always refer to it here as the 1916 Rising. There is a huge emphasis on it, moreso than the foundation of the first Dáil, the War of Independence, the Civil War, or the Treaty. For a failure, it WAS a turning point. If I were you I would focus on the attitudes of the people before and after. Most people did not care one way or the other before the Rising. The vast majority were very poor and it did not effect their daily lives. Those involved in the IRB and the various aspects of the Gaelic Revival were generally middle-class, upper class..and often Protestant. Those wanting Home Rule were the same. The outbreak of WWI did a lot for the swing from Home Rule to physical force Nationalism. Home Rule was shelved, and Redmond urged the joining up of the Volunteers. Many did, tens and tens of thousands. But the minority of the Volunteers saw this as an act of treachery and so the Volunteers split. The 'National' Volunteers fought for England. The 'Irish' Volunteers reformed under Eoin MacNeill. 'England's difficulty is Ireland's oppurtunity'- it was seen as the perfect time to stage a rebellion. Anyway yeah so that was planned....delays etc...low numbers. When it happened, Dubliners were taken by surprise. Most were absolutely bewildered and thought the country had been invaded by the Germans, or that they were Sinn Féiners (note: Sinn Féin as a party were NOT involved). Lots of women in particular were disgusted because while the Rising was ongoing, they were unable to collect their war allowances- husbands etc. fighting in WWI. In general, hostility and confusion. No celebration. The fact that the shops were looted, the centre of Dublin was destroyed, much of the city was cut off and only the most determined efforts could get food to the starved slums and that more than 200 civilians were killed meant that the rebels when they were being taken to prison were jeered, booed and had rotten vegetables thrown at them. People did not understand their motivation, held them up as a joke of an army in comparison to the troops of WWI, and were angry at the destruction.

    The swift execution of 15 (or 16? I can't remember) rebels changed EVERYTHING. That is a really important point. Maxwell was warned not to make martyrs of them, but ignored all warnings. The last to die was Connolly, who had to be strapped to a chair to be shot. This in particular outraged people, especially given his status. Opinion swung around completely, ballads were made etc. This manifested itself in the 1918 election. The IPP who were previously extremely popular and who supported Home Rule lost by a landslide. Sinn Féin, who were wrongly given credit for the Rising, swept to victory. This led to the creation of the first Dáil, and ultimately led to the outbreak of the War of Independence. The rebels were held up as martyrs during the time period. The Rising was a crushing failure but it clearly inspired future actions and future Nationalists.Before the Rising, the majority were content with Home Rule, those that cared that is. After, Home Rule fell by the wayside and the majority wanted total independence. That is why the Rising was a turning point.
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    (Original post by Daniel1987)
    Turning point in what exactly?
    Anglo-Irish Relations
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    All three are very important, but all of them are born from the Easter Rising. Up to that point, physical-force Nationalism paled in comparison to Home Rule and its advocates. After the Rising, violent republicanism completely took over. This was the turning point- the motivation for independence sprang from the Rising. The Treaty is extremely important in that it split the entire movement and sparked the Civil War and Bloody Sunday..hmm. Important obviously but so were other reprisals. Would not call it a turning point. The burning of Cork is significant too, and barely merits a mention. So yeah- the Rising is the key turning point out of the three.
 
 
 
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