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downshifting after exiting motorway watch

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    what do you think is the best to downshift when shifting down by gear like from 5 to 4 etc or do just brake you go straight from 5th to 2nd gear ?
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    I seriously wouldn't downshift into 2nd gear at 70+mph
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    Use the brakes.... brake pads are much cheaper to replace than a clutch.
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    Assuming you mean as you approach a junction, usually a roundabout off of a m/way, then simply come off the gas and move to the brake. At about 9 car lengths away clutch down, select 2nd and clutch up by 6 car lengths at about 15-20mph, allowing the final decision as to whether to stop or go.

    If it looks obvious that it will be a dead stop right from the moment you enter the slip (queues etc), maybe do a quick change to 3rd and simply brake right to the stop, clutching down a couple of car lengths before the stop to save the stall and pre-selecting 1st as you roll out, or neutral if you think the wait could be lengthy, applying the handbrake once stopped.
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    I change down gears and use engine braking, a concept that 98% of people don't understand.
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    (Original post by J_90)
    I change down gears and use engine braking, a concept that 98% of people don't understand.
    As has been stated above, brake pads, discs and even calipers are much cheaper and easier to replace than clutch and gearbox components (clutch, master and slave cylinders and the 'box itself). Brake to slow, gears to go is the DSA mantra, however, 'box-braking is fine and allows the engine to go into over-run which forces the ECU to shut down fuelling, saving money and reducing pollution slightly. The method I described above does exactly this too, and also reduces gear changes to one (possibly two) which keeps both hands on the wheel for safer and better control, and less wear and tear on those expensive drivetrain components. I fully condone using engine braking, but not at the expense of significant amounts of gear changing.
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    Foot off the gas from 70 - 50

    Brakes to 40, change to 4th
    brakes to 30, clutch in
    brakes and clutch to 15
    2nd, to stop / go

    To be honest it depends which car, but thats the routine I take :-) (It's smooth, and produces no weird noises or smells!)
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    Nah....

    Off gas and brake to 30 still in 5/6th,
    Clutch in and change to 2nd, coming off brakes at 15-20 as clutch engages second,
    Stop or go decision time ?

    Less work, less wear, same fuel use, better control.
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    (Original post by Walter Ego)
    As has been stated above, brake pads, discs and even calipers are much cheaper and easier to replace than clutch and gearbox components (clutch, master and slave cylinders and the 'box itself). Brake to slow, gears to go is the DSA mantra, however, 'box-braking is fine and allows the engine to go into over-run which forces the ECU to shut down fuelling, saving money and reducing pollution slightly. The method I described above does exactly this too, and also reduces gear changes to one (possibly two) which keeps both hands on the wheel for safer and better control, and less wear and tear on those expensive drivetrain components. I fully condone using engine braking, but not at the expense of significant amounts of gear changing.
    Why did you quote me? I know exactly how to lessen wear on components and I am fully versed in all aspects of driving (advanced driver + racing licenses), I didn't bother going into detail as most people won't understand or take it on board. The DSA also tell you to shuffle the wheel, I've been in a few situations where that's just stupid and could have ended badly, and a lot of experienced/pro drivers agree. Oh, just because I can drive quickly, and know the ins and outs of my car and it's limits, it doesn't mean I do. I save it for the track. Public roads are filled with morons who can't drive.
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    (Original post by J_90)
    Why did you quote me? I know exactly how to lessen wear on components and I am fully versed in all aspects of driving (advanced driver + racing licenses), I didn't bother going into detail as most people won't understand or take it on board. The DSA also tell you to shuffle the wheel, I've been in a few situations where that's just stupid and could have ended badly, and a lot of experienced/pro drivers agree. Oh, just because I can drive quickly, and know the ins and outs of my car and it's limits, it doesn't mean I do. I save it for the track. Public roads are filled with morons who can't drive.
    I quoted you because your attitude stank and still does. You initially referred to 98% of people not knowing what engine braking is, which you know full well is a fabricated statistic which you haven't a hope in Hell of proving or justifying. In the post I quoted here you brag and boast like you're the next Michael Schumacher, again trying to make out that you know best and everyone else is wrong. I too do racing, have organised my own track day events, attended more than you've had hot dinners, done The 'Ring, driven everything from road cars to supercars, to rally prep'd Scoobs and Evo's and single seat racers. I've been taught by some of the best, and acknowledge that I am nowhere near any of them, but getting better. I've driven just about every circuit in the UK, and many abroad too. I can also differentiate between road driving and race driving, and the best techniques for both, whether trying to achieve safety, control, mechanical sympathy, economy or speed, and tailor my style to suit what I am driving, where, and the prevailing road and weather conditions. My advice above was tailored to suit the majority of what you call 'morons', but will be perfect for most of what I call 'normal everyday drivers', driving ordinary cars on public roads. You may well be a good driver, but you are also a moron in the way you address people ! Also, if you keep up to date with things you will know that the DSA relaxed its position on 'shuffling' the wheel and simply want to see adequate safe control, and also encourage engine braking as it is more economical, but recommend it is used as I prescribed, minimising gear changes to retain safe control.
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    I think this question heavily depends on what car you are driving.

    First of all in an automatic you can't change down gears as others have suggested.

    I have an idea though, that MOST people don't seem to do, just take your foot off accelerator and slow car down naturally, then go through the gears (if manual).
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    Man... this forum is full of immature turds.

    What's with the neg reps....... oh well not that I care anyway.
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    (Original post by Jmzie-Coupe)
    I think this question heavily depends on what car you are driving.

    First of all in an automatic you can't change down gears as others have suggested.


    I have an idea though, that MOST people don't seem to do, just take your foot off accelerator and slow car down naturally, then go through the gears (if manual).
    You can But it isn't encouraged unless it's a DSG or Selespeed.
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    (Original post by Iorek)
    You can But it isn't encouraged unless it's a DSG or Selespeed.
    You can't. The car does it for you. Unless you're talking about tip-tronic gearboxes?
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    Ha, I'm glad I don't drive!!! Too many decisions :-)
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    (Original post by Jmzie-Coupe)
    You can't. The car does it for you. Unless you're talking about tip-tronic gearboxes?
    You can. You have no idea what you're talking about :/
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    (Original post by SkinFadeHaircut)
    You can. You have no idea what you're talking about :/
    Please explain it to me then since you clearly know so much.

    I presume you know there are two types of driving licence?
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    (Original post by Jmzie-Coupe)
    Please explain it to me then since you clearly know so much.

    I presume you know there are two types of driving licence?
    Firstly, do you no what A DGS gearbox is, or Selespeed? If no, you cannot disagree with it, since you do not know what they do.
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    (Original post by SkinFadeHaircut)
    Firstly, do you no what A DGS gearbox is, or Selespeed? If no, you cannot disagree with it, since you do not know what they do.
    When I said explain, I didn't say answer a question with a question, did I?
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    (Original post by SkinFadeHaircut)
    Firstly, do you no what A DGS gearbox is, or Selespeed? If no, you cannot disagree with it, since you do not know what they do.
    Oh, and it's a DSG Gearbox, you moron. Not a DGS. My brother has one on his A3. You clearly don't know what YOU'RE talking about.
 
 
 
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