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downshifting after exiting motorway watch

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    (Original post by J_90)
    I know exactly how to lessen wear on components and I am fully versed in all aspects of driving (advanced driver + racing licenses), I didn't bother going into detail as most people won't understand or take it on board. The DSA also tell you to shuffle the wheel, I've been in a few situations where that's just stupid and could have ended badly, and a lot of experienced/pro drivers agree.
    Interesting you should say that, as most advanced drivers still tend to advocate the 'police shuffle' as the preferred method of steering afaik
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    (Original post by Jmzie-Coupe)
    You can't. The car does it for you. Unless you're talking about tip-tronic gearboxes?
    You can. You know those little numbers under D? Those are lockdown gears. Shifting into those will effectively downshift, but it's not that great for the gearbox to use the lockdown gears to downshift.

    On modern cars engine braking is very much your own choice. On old cars and especially trucks you pretty much have to. With four drum brakes on my car, brake fade is monumental and even a medium length hill leaves the brakes as useful as a chocolate teapot if you ride them all the way down, and they take a long time to cool off too. I've also acquired the skills to rev match very well and double-de-clutch, reducing the wear on my clutch and synchro rings to almost zero when downshifting.

    Skills like that are useful to have in everyday driving so are worth practising.
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    (Original post by Walter Ego)
    I quoted you because your attitude stank and still does. You initially referred to 98% of people not knowing what engine braking is, which you know full well is a fabricated statistic which you haven't a hope in Hell of proving or justifying. In the post I quoted here you brag and boast like you're the next Michael Schumacher, again trying to make out that you know best and everyone else is wrong. I too do racing, have organised my own track day events, attended more than you've had hot dinners, done The 'Ring, driven everything from road cars to supercars, to rally prep'd Scoobs and Evo's and single seat racers. I've been taught by some of the best, and acknowledge that I am nowhere near any of them, but getting better. I've driven just about every circuit in the UK, and many abroad too. I can also differentiate between road driving and race driving, and the best techniques for both, whether trying to achieve safety, control, mechanical sympathy, economy or speed, and tailor my style to suit what I am driving, where, and the prevailing road and weather conditions. My advice above was tailored to suit the majority of what you call 'morons', but will be perfect for most of what I call 'normal everyday drivers', driving ordinary cars on public roads. You may well be a good driver, but you are also a moron in the way you address people ! Also, if you keep up to date with things you will know that the DSA relaxed its position on 'shuffling' the wheel and simply want to see adequate safe control, and also encourage engine braking as it is more economical, but recommend it is used as I prescribed, minimising gear changes to retain safe control.
    I didn't brag or boast about anything, I was just stating what I had done in terms of driving, I don't remember saying I'm a driving god. I hate Schumacher btw, I don't respect drivers who win like he did, I hope he quits again soon, he's not good enough and it will be less dangerous for everyone in Formula 1. Obviously that statistic is made up, like most, but from just watching other drivers you can see how they use brakes unnecessarily. You honestly think the majority of people are good drivers? Ok then....
    I'm not going to keep up with DSA guidelines, it's pointless to me, I was just stating what I had heard from friends who have just passed their test. This wasn't that long ago either.
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    (Original post by Nuffles)
    You can. You know those little numbers under D? Those are lockdown gears. Shifting into those will effectively downshift, but it's not that great for the gearbox to use the lockdown gears to downshift.

    On modern cars engine braking is very much your own choice. On old cars and especially trucks you pretty much have to. With four drum brakes on my car, brake fade is monumental and even a medium length hill leaves the brakes as useful as a chocolate teapot if you ride them all the way down, and they take a long time to cool off too. I've also acquired the skills to rev match very well and double-de-clutch, reducing the wear on my clutch and synchro rings to almost zero when downshifting.

    Skills like that are useful to have in everyday driving so are worth practising.
    They only go as far as third though? Changing down at 70mph+ motorway speeds to second/third gear is a good enough way to **** up your engine. Pointless. Automatics are automatics for a reason.
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    (Original post by TheFatController)
    Interesting you should say that, as most advanced drivers still tend to advocate the 'police shuffle' as the preferred method of steering afaik
    I have been mentored by some ex pro racing drivers and I copy the way they drive and it's much better for me personally and they agree with it, who am I to argue.
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    (Original post by Nuffles)
    You can. You know those little numbers under D? Those are lockdown gears. Shifting into those will effectively downshift, but it's not that great for the gearbox to use the lockdown gears to downshift.

    On modern cars engine braking is very much your own choice. On old cars and especially trucks you pretty much have to. With four drum brakes on my car, brake fade is monumental and even a medium length hill leaves the brakes as useful as a chocolate teapot if you ride them all the way down, and they take a long time to cool off too. I've also acquired the skills to rev match very well and double-de-clutch, reducing the wear on my clutch and synchro rings to almost zero when downshifting.

    Skills like that are useful to have in everyday driving so are worth practising.
    afaik using engine braking (brake-gear overlap) is always acceptable when travelling downhill, especially where there is a risk of brake fade. I think the reason that it has traditionally been avoided is that in older vehicles (like the Minor, I would have thought), the car could try to pull to one side under braking, and it was considered safer for the driver to have both hands on the wheel whilst braking
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    Press 555 if you shook your head and face palmed at more than 50% of the posts in this thread.
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    (Original post by Jmzie-Coupe)
    Oh, and it's a DSG Gearbox, you moron. Not a DGS. My brother has one on his A3. You clearly don't know what YOU'RE talking about.
    Just a misspelling, I was rushing. So what's a DSG gearbox then?
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    I don't have a routine. It depends how fast I'm going, how fast the person in front of me is going, how steep the hill is on the off-ramp and whether it goes up or down, what the weather conditions are, etc. I do think though that if you're slowing down from 70mph you should be showing brake lights. The way I see it, the only times you would exclusively use engine braking is going down a steep hill at low speed, or in very icy/snowy conditions (which unfortunately new drivers aren't taught how to do and therefore crash at the first sight of ice). At other times the brake pedal is there to use. Changing down at high speed won't knacker the clutch as some people seem to believe as long as you use the right gears at the right speed, but brakes aren't made from milk bottle tops any more and in the grand scheme of things, slowing down on an off ramp twice a day using the brakes won't do much damage.
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    (Original post by J_90)
    I have been mentored by some ex pro racing drivers and I copy the way they do it and it's much better for me personally.
    Yeah that's definitely understandable - I think that there is generally a split between pro racing drivers and pro road drivers (in particular police driving schools) as to which method is best.
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    (Original post by SkinFadeHaircut)
    Just a misspelling, I was rushing. So what's a DSG gearbox then?
    No, it doesn't work like that. You said I was wrong. I asked you to explain, you have yet to do that.
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    (Original post by J_90)
    I'm not going to keep up with DSA guidelines, it's pointless to me, I was just stating what I had heard from friends who have just passed their test. This wasn't that long ago either.
    Check out P.55 of the DSA document DT1 which is the comprehensive guidelines for examiners conducting tests.....

    http://www.dft.gov.uk/dsa/Documents/..._procedure.pdf
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    (Original post by SkinFadeHaircut)
    Just a misspelling, I was rushing. So what's a DSG gearbox then?
    It's got tiny butlers in it IIRC :awesome:
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    (Original post by Jmzie-Coupe)
    No, it doesn't work like that. You said I was wrong. I asked you to explain, you have yet to do that.
    Give the **** measuring a rest, yeah?
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    (Original post by Jmzie-Coupe)
    They only go as far as third though? Changing down at 70mph+ motorway speeds to second/third gear is a good enough way to **** up your engine. Pointless. Automatics are automatics for a reason.
    Most autos only have four gears *facepalms*
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    (Original post by TheFatController)
    afaik using engine braking (brake-gear overlap) is always acceptable when travelling downhill, especially where there is a risk of brake fade. I think the reason that it has traditionally been avoided is that in older vehicles (like the Minor, I would have thought), the car could try to pull to one side under braking, and it was considered safer for the driver to have both hands on the wheel whilst braking
    Why would they pull to one side under braking? It's not hard to maintain brakes to a standard that the car pulls up straight..
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    Heel and toe sequentially down through the gears. Anticipate long in advance, use engine braking down to a sensible speed and then brake to a stop.

    If you time it properly, you will be just about to hit the foot brake when the traffic lights change and you can pull away in the correct gear because you have been shifting correctly.

    The thing about causing damage to your gearbox and clutch is utter BS if you can heel and toe (and go down a gear box sequentially).

    PS I guess I should say, don't try to heel and toe in a car that has pedals which are staggered. It won't work. But if you are just changing down and using engine braking, you can blip the throttle with your right foot as normal with your left foot on the clutch and rev match.
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    Loving the level of hatred in this thread.

    It depends but I would normally work my way down through the gears for the engine braking whilst using the brakes too, not something I'd think about though..
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    (Original post by Nuffles)
    Most autos only have four gears *facepalms*
    Err, no they don't? Perhaps you could provide some sources for that claim because even Renault Clio's have 5 gears. :facepalm:
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    Break until 50ish Mph, gear down to 4th, break until 20ish mph then straight to second
 
 
 
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