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    (Original post by tintintintin)
    calling them won't do, because I emailed them saying I don't need a tv license because I don't watch any tv, and I allowed them to send someone here to check, which they never did!!! the first letter I recieved from them after telling them I don't need a tv license is a threatening letter saying they have evidence that I watch tv. says I should pay immediately to avoid prosecution, this is how they deal with it. keep threatening you !!!
    Yes I know, I said that.
    If calling won't do, then go to the place... If you've been summoned to court, go to court and state your case. Get a solicitor involved.
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    (Original post by py0alb)
    If you have neighbours downstairs, then they have no proof. You should go and make sure your tv is only tuned in for the dvd player and not to receive the tv signal, otherwise if they find that it is then that would be pretty strong evidence against you. As it is they don't have a leg to stand on and the case should be thrown out in no time at all. Just make sure you keep your story consistent, which shouldn't be difficult as long as you're not a complete retard.
    the tv was already there when I moved in, it's more than 10 years old , doesn't come with aerial, I don't have one either , I did not admit anything, yet they put so many 'evidence' on the witness statement.
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    (Original post by Emaemmaemily)
    Yes I know, I said that.
    If calling won't do, then go to the place... If you've been summoned to court, go to court and state your case. Get a solicitor involved.
    those *******s ,costing me money to have a solicitor involved, totally ruined my exam revision. tv licensing is such a bullying , and people say this is a free and just country?
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    (Original post by WelshBluebird)
    How?
    If the laptop is running on battery power then you aren't drawing power from the mains.
    He/she does have a point, intentionally or otherwise, which is what I anticipated before editing my original post. The ultimate source of the power is the mains, so it could be argued in either direction. I'd lean towards your view (mostly because I'd like to think there's a loophole) but it depends on what the purpose of the exception was
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    (Original post by tintintintin)
    those *******s ,costing me money to have a solicitor involved, totally ruined my exam revision. tv licensing is such a bullying , and people say this is a free and just country?
    Every country with capitalism isn't "free and just" in the sense it's supposed to be. But that's another discussion.
    Get a solicitor involved, state your case. If you've seriously not watched TV then they can't prosecute you. Deal with it properly, and stop worrying too much because that'll just make you feel worse.
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    (Original post by tintintintin)
    the tv was already there when I moved in, it's more than 10 years old , doesn't come with aerial, I don't have one either , I did not admit anything, yet they put so many 'evidence' on the witness statement.
    Having an aerial, even connected to a TV is utterly irrelevant.
    Being able to receive broadcasts without a licence is not an offence.
    The offence is watching tv without a licence. You have to be caught doing that to be prosecuted.
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    (Original post by tintintintin)
    it's a summon, can't ignore it, got to go to the court
    Go to court then. If you're innocent (which from what you've told us, it seems you are) then you have nothing to fear. You said you didn't sign the witness document. They haven't got proof that you've watched television without a license. Get in contact with a solicitor.
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    (Original post by TurboCretin)
    He/she does have a point, intentionally or otherwise, which is what I anticipated before editing my original post. The ultimate source of the power is the mains, so it could be argued in either direction. I'd lean towards your view (mostly because I'd like to think there's a loophole) but it depends on what the purpose of the exception was
    The initial source of the power does not matter though. How do you know it was the mains? As unlikely as it is, it could have been a generator or whatever. The fact it is battery powered is what matters.

    This is what direct.gov (the governments website) says:
    "Battery-powered equipment
    A TV set powered by its own internal batteries, such as a pocket-sized TV or mobile phone, is covered by a licence at your parents’ address. However, it must not be plugged into the mains while being used to receive television."

    So as long as it is not plugged into the mains while watching live TV, then you are fine.
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    (Original post by Emaemmaemily)
    Every country with capitalism isn't "free and just" in the sense it's supposed to be. But that's another discussion.
    Get a solicitor involved, state your case. If you've seriously not watched TV then they can't prosecute you. Deal with it properly, and stop worrying too much because that'll just make you feel worse.
    I don't watch tv, because the year before the visit, I bought tv license ,but I found the channels are no interest to me ,so never watched it again after the first few months, I turned it on for less than 10 times in the whole year. it just stays in my mind, because this is a criminal case, had no experience in court, worried about the presentation.
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    (Original post by L i b)
    :rolleyes:

    Tripe.
    The BBC run radio stations, therefore they need money to fund these radio stations requiring money from your TV license.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/aboutthebbc/licencefee/

    :rolleyes: Not sure if it is a legal requirement for you to pay money for having a radio, but money from your license certainly funds these radio stations. Get your head out of your arse.
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    (Original post by NeonSkies)
    The BBC run radio stations, therefore they need money to fund these radio stations requiring money from your TV license.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/aboutthebbc/licencefee/

    :rolleyes:
    Yes the licence fee is used to fund BBC radio stations.
    However you do not need a licence to listen to the radio (or to BBC radio stations).

    In exactly the same way the licence fee is used to fund the BBC website, yet you do not need a licence to use that either.
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    (Original post by WelshBluebird)
    Yes the licence fee is used to fund BBC radio stations.
    However you do not need a licence to listen to the radio (or to BBC radio stations).

    In exactly the same way the licence fee is used to fund the BBC website, yet you do not need a licence to use that either.
    Yeah read my edited post.
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    This is ridiculous. I know how pushy they can be from my own experience; one of their guys tried to barge his way into my home. I was terrified as I was on my own and didn't know who he was! (We had paid the license the day before he came round).

    Go to your local citizens advice beaureau and see what they have to say. If you want free legal representation, your local university should have an organisation for third year students who want the practice.

    Best of luck!
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    (Original post by SeaJay)
    This is ridiculous. I know how pushy they can be from my own experience; one of their guys tried to barge his way into my home. I was terrified as I was on my own and didn't know who he was! (We had paid the license the day before he came round).

    Go to your local citizens advice beaureau and see what they have to say. If you want free legal representation, your local university should have an organisation for third year students who want the practice.

    Best of luck!
    citizens advice beaureau doesn't help. you think the university students do that? then I believe many people in student room would do that too. any sugguestions?>
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    (Original post by tintintintin)
    citizens advice beaureau doesn't help. you think the university students do that? then I believe many people in student room would do that too. any sugguestions?>
    Perhaps go to your union, they sometimes help with legal advice. My own experience only pertains to disputes over accommodation though
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    (Original post by WelshBluebird)
    The initial source of the power does not matter though. How do you know it was the mains? As unlickely as it is, it could have been a generator or whatever. The fact it is battery powered is what matters.#

    This is what direct.gov (the governments website) says:
    "Battery-powered equipment
    A TV set powered by its own internal batteries, such as a pocket-sized TV or mobile phone, is covered by a licence at your parents’ address. However, it must not be plugged into the mains while being used to receive television."

    So as long as it is not plugged into the mains while watching live TV, then you are fine.
    Good to know, well ferreted.
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    (Original post by TurboCretin)
    Perhaps go to your union, they sometimes help with legal advice. My own experience only pertains to disputes over accommodation though
    yeah, don't think they can help, they can't even solve the issues about past exam paper solutions.
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    (Original post by tintintintin)
    I do have a tv, but rarely turned it on, I told him only use it for dvd, but very rarely,and that ******* put in the notes saying I watch live tv and have aerial which I told him I don't. my neighbour downstairs use tv frequently, I doubt they really use the detection. besides, the results from the detection can not be used as a proof, because it's always an estimation.
    doesnt matter if it's turned on or not.

    'If you've got a television but you don't watch broadcast TV on it then you can use it without needing a TV licence. For example, if you only use it for watching DVDs or with a games console then it's perfectly legal not to have a TV licence.

    However, you need to make sure that it's not capable of receiving a TV signal. The TV Licensing Officer - and courts - will struggle to believe you if the aerial is still plugged into the back of the TV. Covering up the aerial plug would be a good start.'
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    (Original post by petitflam)
    However, you need to make sure that it's not capable of receiving a TV signal. The TV Licensing Officer - and courts - will struggle to believe you if the aerial is still plugged into the back of the TV. Covering up the aerial plug would be a good start.'
    As far as I am aware, it does not matter.
    Innocent until proven guilty, and TVL have to have actual evidence that you were watching TV without a licence. Just having a cable going into the aeriel socket at the back of the TV is not evidence (as it could be a VHS set, or PS2, or whatever hooked up).
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    (Original post by SeaJay)
    This is ridiculous. I know how pushy they can be from my own experience; one of their guys tried to barge his way into my home. I was terrified as I was on my own and didn't know who he was! (We had paid the license the day before he came round).
    Really? You aren't legally obliged to let them in unless they have a warrant, I think they just assume that most people don't know this and take advantage of that.
 
 
 
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