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    Hey,

    I've not been active on the forum for ages, but thought I'd get more involved in the politics thread!

    I studied Politics & IR at Kent for 18 months (had to withdraw before I finished though).

    I'd like to pose this question to people, do you think your political views have changed since you've started work?

    Cheers

    Chris
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    (Original post by random_bloke)
    Hey,

    I've not been active on the forum for ages, but thought I'd get more involved in the politics thread!

    I studied Politics & IR at Kent for 18 months (had to withdraw before I finished though).

    I'd like to pose this question to people, do you think your political views have changed since you've started work?

    Cheers

    Chris
    Yes, definitely.

    I used to be far more of a socialist. Now I favour a much more market-based economic approach.

    My views on the welfare system changed a fair amount too, particularly in regards to those who claim benefits, rather than work (if they have the ability to).
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    (Original post by Wilzman)
    Yes, definitely.

    I used to be far more of a socialist. Now I favour a much more market-based economic approach.

    My views on the welfare system changed a fair amount too, particularly in regards to those who claim benefits, rather than work (if they have the ability to).
    Exactly the same with me! I would still say I am certainly progressive, but I'm certainly much more of a realist on certain things. When you see the deductions from your pay I think you begin to care more where it's going! I know of people who have never worked, it would never occur to them to work and I can't help but get so incredibly angry about it.

    When I rant about it people say "I thought you were a socialist"; I see nothing socialist about stealing from workers whilst you sit on your arse! It's the opposite of socialism.
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    (Original post by random_bloke)
    Hey,

    I've not been active on the forum for ages, but thought I'd get more involved in the politics thread!

    I studied Politics & IR at Kent for 18 months (had to withdraw before I finished though).

    I'd like to pose this question to people, do you think your political views have changed since you've started work?

    Cheers

    Chris
    I've always supported Margaret Thatcher, but then I never really understood much of politics till I went to university...... I used to be an ardent Democrat supporter when in USA during most of my undergrad years.... but then I started working and I started leaning towards the Republican ideas and finally when I came to Britain I just followed on with the Conservatives, never changed since then.
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    (Original post by random_bloke)
    Exactly the same with me! I would still say I am certainly progressive, but I'm certainly much more of a realist on certain things. When you see the deductions from your pay I think you begin to care more where it's going! I know of people who have never worked, it would never occur to them to work and I can't help but get so incredibly angry about it.

    When I rant about it people say "I thought you were a socialist"; I see nothing socialist about stealing from workers whilst you sit on your arse! It's the opposite of socialism.
    Realism is the right word.
    If we could all sit on our backsides and do what we like, it would be great. Unfortunately, we live in a world where work is a necessity, and for some people to work extremely hard to support others who do nothing (even when they can) is simply unfair, and a rotten system.

    I'm really glad there are efforts in Gov't at the moment to change that side of the welfare system (that of laziness, and it being more profitable for a lot of people to remain on benefits than it is to work).
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    Although I can't answer this first-hand, I've noticed most peoples' political views tend to change after they enter the world of work, and it makes sense too... you experience first hand a lot of what you only hear or learn about and shape views according. Probably explains to an extent why a lot of people seem to become increasingly right-wing from their student days.
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    When I did work (before I fell behind on college work) my views changed slightly as in I wasn't as far right as I am now....
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    I don't think I've become more "right" as such (I think left/right is an increasingly redundant model), I just think I've become more pragmatic - more receptive to the reality that society has to function as best it can.
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    (Original post by Stressworthy)
    Although I can't answer this first-hand, I've noticed most peoples' political views tend to change after they enter the world of work, and it makes sense too... you experience first hand a lot of what you only hear or learn about and shape views according. Probably explains to an extent why a lot of people seem to become increasingly right-wing from their student days.
    It can go the other way. Discovering that you too are not immune from recession-caused unemployment and the welfare system is something you now need to survive is a big shock to some people. It's easy to say OTHER people should take any job going when you think you're safe in the knowledge that you won't ever be on minimum wage.
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    (Original post by foreveranon)
    It can go the other way. Discovering that you too are not immune from recession-caused unemployment and the welfare system is something you now need to survive is a big shock to some people. It's easy to say OTHER people should take any job going when you think you're safe in the knowledge that you won't ever be on minimum wage.
    I don't think anyone can be "safe in the knowledge" that you won't be on minimum wage. I think a lot of people will get a shock when they leave university.

    I've worked on minimum wage when I've had to, it's not nice ... but you have to do it.
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    (Original post by random_bloke)
    I don't think anyone can be "safe in the knowledge" that you won't be on minimum wage. I think a lot of people will get a shock when they leave university.

    I've worked on minimum wage when I've had to, it's not nice ... but you have to do it.
    :ditto:

    I want to be a doctor and am heading to medical school in September. I expect to be on a relatively large salary, and it is a stable career, but if I lost my job, and had no choice, I would still work for the minimum wage rather than sit on my bum doing nothing.

    I've been on minimum wage for the past year, and as long as you curtail your standard of living/spending habits, it's not that bad (Although I can see it must be really hard for people with families to do that).
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    Once you've worked for a couple of years, all that warm fussy feeling you get from believing in the capitalist system, market system, or from Tory policies, flies out the window. Give it a couple of years and you'll probably be sympathising with those "not wanting to work". The comments here about supporting drastic changes to the welfare state which may involve taking away people's only means of support due to a perception that people are lazy, I suspect, are from people who have probably not spent much time in the world of work at all. I give these people a few years before they start coming round.

    There's a naievity about these type of people that a decade or two of hard graft and paying taxes would remove.
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    (Original post by foreveranon)
    It can go the other way. Discovering that you too are not immune from recession-caused unemployment and the welfare system is something you now need to survive is a big shock to some people. It's easy to say OTHER people should take any job going when you think you're safe in the knowledge that you won't ever be on minimum wage.
    Of course I can see that some people may take that view - was just commenting on my own experience... as in, most people I've seen and how their views have changed, tbh.
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    I wouldn't say I have changed massively, just I've become more open minded to ideas from both sides of the political-economic spectrum. When I was younger I used to always rail against the big profits made by 'corporations' and want them to face high taxes. Then you realise as you get older how the average joe has more vested interest in the performance of those corporations than he might expect. When corporations profits tumble then most peoples pension funds take a hit, and when business confidence falls, investment drops and unemployment is the result.

    On the other hand as I've got older I have realised that some of the simplistic arguments used by free-marketers don't stand up. The Laffer curve effect whereby if you cut taxes, overall tax revenues increase, is rarely found in reality, it works in text books but in the real world generally has the opposite effect. Privatising health care tends to result in more expensive health bills not cheaper, and countries like Switzerland where you have to pay for health insurance, end up being massively expensive. Just because you pay lower 'tax' you end up paying the difference and more in other things.

    So I am always open to both sides. I don't agree with all these people who **** off Mrs Thatcher or Gordon Brown, I think they both did a good job for the country in the circumstances that faced them. I know most people or the media don't agree but that's the conclusion I've come to.

    As for views changing after you start work, it depends what type of work you get. Most people who were lefties and into campaigns at university, who then go on to get a good graduate job, start to become more conservative in nature as they have more of a stake in the 'system'. They will look over its faults and think, well I've done well for myself, it must be a reward for my hard work, other people should follow my example.

    Then you get other people who end up getting disillusioned by the system because they find themselves working very hard for little reward. A lot of 6 formers are very right wing, you see this on TSR, they all probably expect that they're going to get a high flying job at that age, so they rail against the feckless lazy unemployed and so on. Some of them will get good jobs but you also get some who end up unable to land a graduate job and that's where views change and they become less pro-privatising everything and forcing the unemployed to work a manual job for their dole.

    As with all things most of the time people are very keen to say they support things like future students having to pay tuition fees, people living on low wage jobs, cuts for benefits, when they don't expect this will affect them themselves. They get a shock when it does and that's when peoples views do change.
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    I finished school. Worked for a year in the NHS, become more liberal socialist. Went to Sussex Uni (a very left wing uni), became more liberal (and less socialist). Then I'm back working in the NHs and have become more socialist.
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    I don't really feel great affinity to any political party. My views haven't changed after 5 years of work.
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    If anything, I've become more left wing after 4 years of tedious jobs. The system sucks.

    I wonder if the type of work you do has any bearing on it though..
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    Entering the world of work resulted in me being hit by taxes. It's all well and good wanting everything for free, but when it's your money that these "free" things are being paid for, yes, it does wake you up.

    Most importantly, work has taught me that ideology is nowhere near as important as the ability of people to effectively implement it. I draw the line when ideology reaches harman/ abbott levels of insanity, but still.
 
 
 
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