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England has to pay £7.40 prescription charges, rest of UK don't. WHY? watch

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    I think anyone with long term health conditions should get free prescriptions.
    Thanks to prescription costs, if I get ill at uni I'll have to be literally dying on my feet before I go to see a doctor.
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    (Original post by ToastyCoke)
    Take a look at the population of England, then Scotland and Wales. And now, shut up. I've had to get 3 prescriptions in the past 2 months and it's been £3.50 a time. It's not like it's daylight robbery, jesus.
    shut up scotland
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    (Original post by (:Becca(:)
    I think anyone with long term health conditions should get free prescriptions.
    Thanks to prescription costs, if I get ill at uni I'll have to be literally dying on my feet before I go to see a doctor.
    i know its so awful and unfair
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    Usually I don't mind, but recently I had to pay £7.40 for 6 tablets that probably cost about 16p each. I forgot to get a form so I could claim it back :grumble:
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    For the past week, I've had a really painful UTI, and if I were just that little bit older and 19, I'd have had to pay that damn £7.40 prescription charge for a measly 6 pills (3 day short course of antibis). I'm not looking forward to having to pay when I'm 19 - personally I don't think any student should have to pay, as if I was 19 and wasn't at home at the time, if I did have to pay the charge I would have struggled.

    Looks like I'm due to go back to the docs, however. The area round one of my kidney kills and I hope it's not a side effect of these antibiotics. I had a really arsey doctor last time in the walk in clinic too.

    BAH, NHS. Sort your life out.
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    One of the reasons why I came to uni in Wales.... I've just worked out that if I had been in England, over the past 6 months I would have spent nearly £100 on prescription charges.. :eek: (Been trying to find the right medication for what I need..)

    It's actually one of the reasons why I'm refusing to be put back onto antidepressants... If I go onto them, I will probably have to be on them for years, if not for the rest of my life.. I can't afford them when I'm back in England for the summer (my Welsh doctors won't give me enough to get through the summer) or when I move back to England fulltime after uni. :sad:

    But free prescriptions really aren't all that great. I've found that in Wales, they've been putting me onto the cheapest medication (in terms of cost to the NHS) in the hope that it might work. Whereas, my doctors at home give me the medication they think will be the best for me, not the cheapest... (This is back when I still got free prescriptions in England as I was under 19.)
    Also, it takes a lot longer to be referred here. For example, (sorry if it's too much TMI for people but whatever) I haven't had a period for nearly 16 months now. So my last one was in December 2009. Went to my Welsh doctors in June 2010 and they told me that they don't investigative until you haven't had a period in over 12 months regardless of any previous investigations etc as it's policy. In July, I went to my doctors back home in England. They started investigating straight because it's policy to investigative after 6 months in England.
    Still took until January to get a diagnoses though thanks to having to switch back and forth between doctors...
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    (Original post by Hravan)
    One of the reasons why I came to uni in Wales.... I've just worked out that if I had been in England, over the past 6 months I would have spent nearly £100 on prescription charges.. :eek: (Been trying to find the right medication for what I need..)

    It's actually one of the reasons why I'm refusing to be put back onto antidepressants... If I go onto them, I will probably have to be on them for years, if not for the rest of my life.. I can't afford them when I'm back in England for the summer (my Welsh doctors won't give me enough to get through the summer) or when I move back to England fulltime after uni. :sad:

    But free prescriptions really aren't all that great. I've found that in Wales, they've been putting me onto the cheapest medication (in terms of cost to the NHS) in the hope that it might work. Whereas, my doctors at home give me the medication they think will be the best for me, not the cheapest... (This is back when I still got free prescriptions in England as I was under 19.)
    Also, it takes a lot longer to be referred here. For example, (sorry if it's too much TMI for people but whatever) I haven't had a period for nearly 16 months now. So my last one was in December 2009. Went to my Welsh doctors in June 2010 and they told me that they don't investigative until you haven't had a period in over 12 months regardless of any previous investigations etc as it's policy. In July, I went to my doctors back home in England. They started investigating straight because it's policy to investigative after 6 months in England.
    Still took until January to get a diagnoses though thanks to having to switch back and forth between doctors...
    Ah yes. The GP you went to must have been part of "Wales NHS trust" ergo it must be the same in all of Wales, right?

    Oh, wait...
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    (Original post by Philbert)
    Usually I don't mind, but recently I had to pay £7.40 for 6 tablets that probably cost about 16p each. I forgot to get a form so I could claim it back :grumble:
    Yeah. I'm sure the millions of pills that were developed and tested for whatever condition it was meant to treat and didn't work, all the specialist lab work, the drug trials and materials gives an end cost of 16p each when the correct formula is reached.
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    Becuase Scotland's spending per head is £2,000 more than in Endgland. Disgraceful i know when it's us down here, especially in the south that create all that tax revenue.
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    (Original post by RollerBall)
    Ah yes. The GP you went to must have been part of "Wales NHS trust" ergo it must be the same in all of Wales, right?

    Oh, wait...
    No, I'm just saying that in my experience it's what I've found...

    My sister had a similar experience in Cardiff as well...
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    Wales & Scotland are responsible for setting their own health budgets. The Welsh Assembly and Scottish Parliament are not provided with any extra money to fund free prescriptions, it's something they do at a cost to something else in their budgets. The people who whine about it tend not to understand how the financial arrangements of British devolution work.
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    Only about 10% of patients actually pay?
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    (Original post by Helevorn)
    It's free in Northern Ireland too, not that anybody has bothered to mention us..
    Northern where??

    [only joking]
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    (Original post by wilshere)
    It is simply pathetic and unfair.
    I think its unfair too. Kids and OAP's should get free prescriptions. For everyone else- either everyone should get free prescriptions or no one should.
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    They're Welsh or Scottish - far worse than paying £7.40 in my eyes...
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    At least there are options for people who can't afford it. For example, HC2 certificates, which students living off a loan are very likely to qualify for. Or under 18's in education not having to pay. Or no charge for contraceptives. Or free prescriptions for some long term illnesses. Or pre-payment cards that save a lot of money.

    All in all, the charge isn't 'ideal' but it's still a pretty good system that I wouldn't want to lose, and at least the money can go back in to health care.
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    because english MPs don't vote on Scottish and Welsh issues, but Welsh and Scottish MPs do vote on English issues. The Scottish and Welsh MPs therefore vote against the best interests of the English. It's called the West Lothian question, and shows how biased the parliamentary system is against the English.
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    A lot of the people complaining spend more on beer in in an hour or on cakes and chocolates passing through Tescos.

    Does the principle bother you?
    Wales and Scotland are taking funds away from elsewhere to pay for this.

    I think it's a reasonable amount. Many medicines cost a lot more than £7.40, so for one off medicines it's fine. For chronic illnesses, they ought to review this and also look at providing it for free to those that are unemployed.

    If we go back to a free system, why not consider a redemption system. Then maybe we'll get a lot of people who don't actually care about £7 odd not bothering, and those that are desperate making sure they get back every penny. I dunno, just a thought. The healthcare service is abused though. You get a lot of people getting medicines for absolutely any and everything.

    It's funny students are up in arms when they don't even pay taxes lol

    IF YOU WANT A REAL TOPIC about excessive charges, let's talk about hospital car parking. It's a bloody rip-off and it's unethical!
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    (Original post by Panthea)
    I totally agree - if anything needs an overhaul it's the list of conditions that qualify for free prescriptions. It might have changed now, but it used to be the case that a Cystic Fibrosis patient (a genetic condition, nothing you can do about that) who relied on drugs to stay alive wasn't on the list...that's just crackers in my opinion!

    Also, I believe that any drugs you take to manage chronic/lifelong conditions (e.g. asthma inhalers) are free, but others you need on an ad hoc or short-term basis (e.g. antibiotics) are chargeable. I take thyroxine and will have to for life, so I qualify for free prescriptions. I feel bad that it covers everything, so I pay for anything that isn't thyroxine. Makes me feel like it's fairer
    Good for you My housemate qualifies for free prescriptions due to a thyroid condition, but doesn't pay for any medication, and doesn't intend to, even when she's earning. I can sort of see why she doesn't at the moment, as she's a student, but I'd much sooner see a system where more drug dependent conditions have free medication for needs relating to the condition but not other short term problems.
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    i actually don't go to the doctors when i'm ill cos i know i can't really afford the prescription. finally went this pay day after spending 8 weeks with a very nasty ear infection and now i've got my meds its cleared up considerably i'm very prone to ear infections and the drops aren't to be used after 28 days so it's a bit of a pain. and i can't really afford to prepay either.
 
 
 
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