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How can I stop the Government getting back their student loan? watch

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    (Original post by Lemozo)
    Yes but I didn't expect to earn over the threshold, and so I'd always seen it as a grant rather than a loan.
    ok i have a solution. you give me all the money you earn over the threshold. and i'll pay off your student loan for you. problem solved.
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    You do realise that you will have a larger net amount of money earning over the threshold and paying a small pittance per month than earning less than the threshold and not paying anything back, right?

    And if you never thought you'd earn over £15,000 what were you doing at university for all those years?!
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    (Original post by WelshBluebird)
    You never expected to earn over £15k? What world do you live in?
    I don't think that this is that peculiar? I don't expect to ever earn over £15k, as jobs are scarce and well-paying ones are even rarer, and I know I'm not the most employable of people. But if I do, obviously I'll have no qualms about paying back my student loan - anyone earning over £15k has been helped into that position by their degree in the first place.

    I'm very interested by this loophole of moving abroad though :holmes: I was planning to move to Germany post-degree, but I'd assumed the SLC would expect repayments if you earnt £15k+ no matter where you did so - is this not the case?
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    (Original post by Lemozo)
    I'd always seen it as a grant rather than a loan.
    There's no such thing as free money.

    Keep that in mind for the future.
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    Why shouldn't you pay it back?! It's a loan, not a grant. Also I don't know what kind of full time job you were expecting to get where you would never earn over £15,000!
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    (Original post by kerily)
    I don't think that this is that peculiar? I don't expect to ever earn over £15k, as jobs are scarce and well-paying ones are even rarer, and I know I'm not the most employable of people. But if I do, obviously I'll have no qualms about paying back my student loan - anyone earning over £15k has been helped into that position by their degree in the first place.
    I get what you are saying.
    But what I mean is that the average wage is £25k. You go to university to better yourself, and most people going to uni expect to earn more than the average wage.
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    (Original post by History-Student)
    You're earning over £15k, is it really that much of a hardship to pay it back you ungrateful ****?
    It may not be, but I just disagree with the principle of paying it back.

    I am forced through taxation to pay for all the families on benefits and I don't want to, why can't all the money they receive be a loan that they have to pay back once their children have grown up. That would seem fair. Same with the Jobseekers allowance.

    I see absolutely nothing wrong with receiving a small amount of money each year to live on at uni and having the fees paid. Its not as if students can claim enough to keep them in a luxury lifestyle like ####### chavs can! They can't claim housing benefit or receive free meals etc.
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    (Original post by Elissabeth)
    I am forced through taxation to pay for all the families on benefits and I don't want to, why can't all the money they receive be a loan that they have to pay back once their children have grown up.
    Yes, there are benefit cheats out there. Yes there are people who are trying to bleed the system dry. But these aren't all claimants. Some, due to circumstances (often chronic unemployment, sickness/disability) have their earnings and prospects irrevocably damaged.

    Same with the Jobseekers allowance.
    Right...even those who go into low paid work? They have to fork out even more money, despite struggling to make ends meet? Even those who have actually paid taxes in the past (therefore paid into the system). Not all unemployed people are workshy toerags, you know, not even those who are long-term unemployed.

    They can't claim housing benefit or receive free meals etc.
    Some can (all part-time students are eligible to claim and some types of full-time students). You also miss out the important fact that all full time students are exempt from council tax.

    Most students are also eligible for free prescriptions, dental treatment and eyetests on the grounds on income. They just need to apply for it (I've forgotten the form).

    Luxury is relative. But, in these last eight years, I certainly haven't seen the students at my university live in worse conditions than a family on benefits.

    Then, this is Durham.

    Back on topic, what the OP is asking is wanting to do is effectively fraud. This is both illegal and highly unethical. It was his decision to get a degree. He knew that, when earning a cerain amount, he will need to pay it back. He cannot now turn around and complain about this.
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    (Original post by Elissabeth)
    It may not be, but I just disagree with the principle of paying it back.

    I am forced through taxation to pay for all the families on benefits and I don't want to, why can't all the money they receive be a loan that they have to pay back once their children have grown up. That would seem fair. Same with the Jobseekers allowance.

    I see absolutely nothing wrong with receiving a small amount of money each year to live on at uni and having the fees paid. Its not as if students can claim enough to keep them in a luxury lifestyle like ####### chavs can! They can't claim housing benefit or receive free meals etc.
    If you think everyone on benefits is living a life of luxury you are a misguided twit.

    And you say it's a small amount, but if it's a grant for all students that turns very quickly into a very big amount.
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    (Original post by River85)
    Yes, there are benefit cheats out there. Yes there are people who are trying to bleed the system dry. But these aren't all claimants. Some, due to circumstances (often chronic unemployment, sickness/disability) have their earnings and prospects irrevocably damaged.

    Right...even those who go into low paid work? They have to fork out even more money, despite struggling to make ends meet? Even those who have actually paid taxes in the past (therefore paid into the system). Not all unemployed people are workshy toerags, you know, not even those who are long-term unemployed.

    Some can (all part-time students are eligible to claim and some types of full-time students). You also miss out the important fact that all full time students are exempt from council tax.

    Most students are also eligible for free prescriptions, dental treatment and eyetests on the grounds on income. They just need to apply for it (I've forgotten the form).

    Luxury is relative. But, in these last eight years, I certainly haven't seen the students at my university live in worse conditions than a family on benefits.
    T.
    No, not those in very low-paid work. Simply the same rules. Once they start earning over £15,000 they can start paying their benefits back directly.

    So what if someone's put into the system in the past? Many of us have paid tax on gap years as well, most of us that have part-time jobs pay National Insurance and so put into the system. And what do we get for it? Nothing.

    So what if we are exempt from council tax? Have you ever met a student who'd been awarded a council house?

    I've seen students who can barely afford food. Loads have to buy value brands. I've never heard of a chav kid going without an expensive christmas present or getting nothing for their birthday. Go to any estate and you'll see loads of cars. I know people on benefits who even manage to go on holiday!
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    (Original post by History-Student)
    If you think everyone on benefits is living a life of luxury you are a misguided twit.

    And you say it's a small amount, but if it's a grant for all students that turns very quickly into a very big amount.
    No, but for even one family to do so is morally wrong, IMO.

    The amount of students is neglible compared to the amount of families on benefits in this country, so drastically reducing what they receive would be the best way to save money.
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    (Original post by Elissabeth)
    No, but for even one family to do so is morally wrong, IMO.

    The amount of students is neglible compared to the amount of families on benefits in this country, so drastically reducing what they receive would be the best way to save money.
    That's the point though: non-scammers receive **** all because they don't play the system.

    My ex has £2.44/fortnight excess after necessary bills & a genuinely low food budget. You think it's fair that she has money taken away from her because some knobhead is pretending to be in a wheelchair?
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    Why not ring HMRC and ask them to stop taking your money, we'll see where you end up.

    My guess prison.
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    (Original post by Elissabeth)
    So what if we are exempt from council tax? Have you ever met a student who'd been awarded a council house?
    What??
    Council tax has nothing to do council houses!
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    Ummm... Even if you move aboard you do have to pay: http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/Educatio...98/DG_10034872
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    (Original post by Elissabeth)
    So what if we are exempt from council tax? Have you ever met a student who'd been awarded a council house?
    You do realise that council tax isn't exclusive to council houses, right?
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    **** you, and pay your taxes like an honest citizen you scrounging ****
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    (Original post by Elissabeth)
    No, not those in very low-paid work. Simply the same rules. Once they start earning over £15,000 they can start paying their benefits back directly.
    That's completely unworkable, or certainly very difficult.

    You also ned to consider family size, mortgage..

    £15,000 is not much more than minmimum wage. If that person is the main household earner, and has a mortgage and family to feed, then you really expect him or to to "pay back" the state?

    And before you say it, yes, I am aware that students are expected to pay their loan back at this amount. However, the difference is that studying for the degree and taking the loan was utlimately their choice. Someone who takes forced redundancy, or who becomes ill, did not do so out of choice.

    Moreoever, most graduates will be in their 20s and therefore unlikely to have a mortgage or family. Yes, I'm aware they they'd like to get onto the housing ladder and start a family but they know in advance they need to pay this money back and therefore plan their life as well as they can.

    So what if someone's put into the system in the past? Many of us have paid tax on gap years as well, most of us that have part-time jobs pay National Insurance and so put into the system. And what do we get for it? Nothing.
    Meaning that they have paid into the pot, therefore deserve to take what they need (not necessarily want) from the pot. Why should they pay twice?

    That's what the welfare state is, or is intended to be, a safety net. You will possibly benefit it it yourself eventually. You go to the NHS for treatment? You're planning on taking a state pension? Are you going to have kids? How do you know you'll always be employed all your life? How do you know you'll never be sick?

    So what if we are exempt from council tax? Have you ever met a student who'd been awarded a council house?
    What??? Do you have any idea what council tax is?

    Council tax is what you pay the council for local services (street cleaning, parks, refuse collection and so on). The amount you pay is based on the valuation of your home (in 1991, I think). It's not just for those who are in council houses....

    Full time students are exempt from paying this. Part-time students are not, though they are entitled to claim for council tax benefit (which will be awardeD)

    I've never heard of a chav kid going without an expensive christmas present or getting nothing for their birthday. Go to any estate and you'll see loads of cars. I know people on benefits who even manage to go on holiday!
    And here we go again...all people claiming benefits are "chavs".

    I don't know about chavs, but I certainly do know of families living on benefits who find it a struggle to feed themselves and certainly don't go on expensive holidays.

    (Original post by Elissabeth)
    The amount of students is neglible compared to the amount of families on benefits in this country, so drastically reducing what they receive would be the best way to save money.
    So, instead of targeting the cheats and making the system fairer (which is far more difficult that you imagine), you want to punish everyone claiming benefits even if it means plunging many families and individuals even further into relative poverty?

    Awesome.
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    (Original post by kerily)
    But if I do, obviously I'll have no qualms about paying back my student loan - anyone earning over £15k has been helped into that position by their degree in the first place.
    Uh... not true. I was on £15,000 without a degree. It actually got to £19,000 without one.
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    (Original post by krazykipper)
    Uh... not true. I was on £15,000 without a degree. It actually got to £19,000 without one.
    Oh sorry, I meant people who are earning £15k+ and have a degree at the same time - I do know that you can earn over £15k without a degree
 
 
 
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