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5 year tuition fee limit.. Apparently means I don't get any next year! Help? watch

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    Hey gang,

    I did two years of an architecture course and failed the second year. I'm now starting a new course in september which is 4 years long. After a phone call to Student Finance apparently they can only give me a total of 4 years tuition fees, plus 1 year contingency.. but that's still 1 year less than my total number of years will be so they want to not give me tuition fees in september for that whole year.

    Am I gonna have to ask my dad to lend me £3000+? I already owe him £3000 for this years "gap year" accommodation.. Anything I can do to just get them to do my tuition fees anyway?

    Ben
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    Any particular reason for leaving the previous course?
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    Yeh, I failed the second year :P Off to do what I should've done from the start
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    The assessment is correct then, I'm afraid.

    It's not a set number of years, it's the length of the new course +1 year, minus years you've previously been in attendance. So for the new course it'd be (4+1) - 2 = 3 years support. The regulations state that any years of support must be allocated from the final year of the new course working backwards, until all entitlement is used. This would give you help with fees in years 2, 3 and 4 but restrict you to a maintenance loan only in the first year.
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    (Original post by Taiko)
    The assessment is correct then, I'm afraid.

    It's not a set number of years, it's the length of the new course +1 year, minus years you've previously been in attendance. So for the new course it'd be (4+1) - 2 = 3 years support. The regulations state that any years of support must be allocated from the final year of the new course working backwards, until all entitlement is used. This would give you help with fees in years 2, 3 and 4 but restrict you to a maintenance loan only in the first year.
    Out of curiosity, why do they pay the last three years of the course instead of the first? To me it would make more sense to not pay the final year, and therefore give the OP the chance to save up £3k with summer jobs/termtime work over the next three years...
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    (Original post by Becca-Sarah)
    Out of curiosity, why do they pay the last three years of the course instead of the first? To me it would make more sense to not pay the final year, and therefore give the OP the chance to save up £3k with summer jobs/termtime work over the next three years...
    Hold onto the money longer and not have to pay it out as soon.

    Edit: /cynicism.
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    (Original post by Becca-Sarah)
    Out of curiosity, why do they pay the last three years of the course instead of the first? To me it would make more sense to not pay the final year, and therefore give the OP the chance to save up £3k with summer jobs/termtime work over the next three years...
    It's done because the regulations that go before parliament each year state that to be the case. One way of looking at it, would you really want to do 2 or 3 years of a course, and realise in your final year you couldn't afford the fees?

    If that happened, then some students would never be able to gain a degree, because the years funding they had to get there would be used up if they were forced to start again.

    You also have a case where a student will conveniently forget they were not entitled to that final year, then kick up a fuss at the end. It's better to set it clearly in that first year, rather than have to deal with it later.

    I guess it's also a way of the student demonstrating that they're able to actually undertake a course and get their head down, for what would be a 3rd attempt at a first year.
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    (Original post by Taiko)
    It's done because the regulations that go before parliament each year state that to be the case. One way of looking at it, would you really want to do 2 or 3 years of a course, and realise in your final year you couldn't afford the fees?

    If that happened, then some students would never be able to gain a degree, because the years funding they had to get there would be used up if they were forced to start again.

    You also have a case where a student will conveniently forget they were not entitled to that final year, then kick up a fuss at the end. It's better to set it clearly in that first year, rather than have to deal with it later.

    I guess it's also a way of the student demonstrating that they're able to actually undertake a course and get their head down, for what would be a 3rd attempt at a first year.
    That actually makes a lot of sense, now I think about it. I was quite concerned when I saw the title of the OP, given that I'm extending my course to 6 years - I wouldn't want to have done 5 years of this to find that I couldn't afford that final hurdle! Not a great deal of people have £3k in immediate funds to pay out to start a course, though I guess if, as you say, SLC insist they pay the first year of the course, it gives them an opportunity to take time out beforehand to earn that money than leave in the middle of their degree.
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    Ok, guys I some help with my situation...OK so I started at university doing a foundation year which wasn't the full fee amount as a normal a degree program it was like £1200 or something. However I failed due to my grandad passing away and having to attend to family duties because of this, which was during my may exam period. I wasn't able to pass the year due to this. I told the university why I failed and they allowed me to retake the year but only the modules that I failed. I passed the foundation and successfully went on to my degree program in which I am in my final year. I didn't have any knowledge of the university only funding 4 years. My degree is a 3 year course as I did not do a placement year. So I did foundation for 2 years and now on my degree in final year. Up until now i was receiving my full tuition fee, full maintenance loan and grant, however now they are saying last minute that they will not be paying the tuition fee's. What can I do? The only thing i can think of is asking them if i can pay one of the foundation year off in full and receiving the tution fee for my final year?
 
 
 
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