Turn on thread page Beta

Do UCL economics graduates have the same or similar employment prospects as LSE? watch

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    It has been a matter of debate then again whether if one should chose UCL or LSE if one get offers from both for economics(undergraduate). Provided that offers are similar......it is fair to assume that UCL provides a more sociable environment while LSE is more tedious......if both are considered as top tier Universities, I was wondering whether if the employments prospects for people who hav completed there undergrad from either would be the same or atleast similar?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    If you want a career in economics then it really has to be LSE. On the other hand, if you are thinking of pursuing a Phd you'd be better off getting a degree from UCL
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Check out: http://unistats.direct.gov.uk/

    Really helpful
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by zareef92)
    It has been a matter of debate then again whether if one should chose UCL or LSE if one get offers from both for economics(undergraduate). Provided that offers are similar......it is fair to assume that UCL provides a more sociable environment while LSE is more tedious......if both are considered as top tier Universities, I was wondering whether if the employments prospects for people who hav completed there undergrad from either would be the same or atleast similar?
    I think it is generally assumed that LSE would put you in a (slightly) better position for employment but in going to UCL you are more likely to end up as a social butterfly....
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    LSE has the better brand name and has a proven track record with its BSc Economics programme. That being said, UCL isn't that far behind at all - a top student will not be disadvantaged by choosing UCL for Economics over LSE.
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    go to hull
    Offline

    13
    (Original post by zareef92)
    It has been a matter of debate then again whether if one should chose UCL or LSE if one get offers from both for economics(undergraduate). Provided that offers are similar......it is fair to assume that UCL provides a more sociable environment while LSE is more tedious......if both are considered as top tier Universities, I was wondering whether if the employments prospects for people who hav completed there undergrad from either would be the same or atleast similar?
    Can't you be sociable at LSE?

    Why pick one or the other, just have both.
    • PS Helper
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    PS Helper
    Your degree will not get you a job :facepalm2:
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I'd say that LSE might have a slight edge in employability but it's not going to be significant. But really. Both will get you to the interviews. Beyond that, it all depends on your individual performance.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by kbountra)
    I think it is generally assumed that LSE would put you in a (slightly) better position for employment but in going to UCL you are more likely to end up as a social butterfly....
    So I might be just as well off going to UCL and considering he fact that it provides a better social life, I should decide on chosining UCL over LSE?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by zareef92)
    So I might be just as well off going to UCL and considering he fact that it provides a better social life, I should decide on chosining UCL over LSE?
    I would personally find it difficult to reject LSE on the basis that it is so renowned for Economics. Social life is what you make of it at the end of the day but UCL is more all-round so I guess you'd meet a wider mix of people if you went there. Which of the courses do you prefer because that has to be the most important factor in your decision?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    LBS is better than both
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by kbountra)
    I would personally find it difficult to reject LSE on the basis that it is so renowned for Economics. Social life is what you make of it at the end of the day but UCL is more all-round so I guess you'd meet a wider mix of people if you went there. Which of the courses do you prefer because that has to be the most important factor in your decision?
    I have applied for economics (undergrad) in both and have got offers from both. Ironically, I find the UCL offer slightly more difficult to fulfil. Nevertheless, my aunt had taken a floater at LSE and she told me that LSE classrooms were way to big to be of much help when it comes to education. Moreover, the environment was rather drab. However, I wish to get employed at good institution and if UCL helps me do that just as well as LSE, and if I have a better time at UCL, I can't think of great reason for chosing LSE over UCL. What do you think?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by zareef92)
    I have applied for economics (undergrad) in both and have got offers from both. Ironically, I find the UCL offer slightly more difficult to fulfil. Nevertheless, my aunt had taken a floater at LSE and she told me that LSE classrooms were way to big to be of much help when it comes to education. Moreover, the environment was rather drab. However, I wish to get employed at good institution and if UCL helps me do that just as well as LSE, and if I have a better time at UCL, I can't think of great reason for chosing LSE over UCL. What do you think?
    I'd choose LSE for Economics, purely for the course's reputation/prestige and the greater employment opportunities it would open up over UCL. But I would only choose LSE over UCL for the Economics course, nothing else...
    Here's how I put my decision across between UCL and LSE (for a different course though):
    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...9&postcount=86

    You have a tough decision to make, but it's a good dilemma to have
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by therealOG)
    I'd choose LSE for Economics, purely for the course's reputation/prestige and the greater employment opportunities it would open up over UCL. But I would only choose LSE over UCL for the Economics course, nothing else...
    Here's how I put my decision across between UCL and LSE (for a different course though):
    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...9&postcount=86

    You have a tough decision to make, but it's a good dilemma to have
    Don't you think LSE would take me up for econ if I applied for postgrad? And isn't that what counts eventually when it comes to employability. As mentioned in your hyperlinked post, I have heard that the undergrad education isnt that good at LSE.....its just the name that counts. So I am considering doing undergrad at UCL followd by postgrad at LSE......does that seem like a good decision?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by zareef92)
    Don't you think LSE would take me up for econ if I applied for postgrad? And isn't that what counts eventually when it comes to employability. As mentioned in your hyperlinked post, I have heard that the undergrad education isnt that good at LSE.....its just the name that counts. So I am considering doing undergrad at UCL followd by postgrad at LSE......does that seem like a good decision?
    It depends what you want in your career. If you just want to go straight into investment banking (and work for the Goldman Sachs ) then I'd say LSE undergrad due the networking opportunities it has and its position as a top target uni. But if you're looking at a Masters in Economics then UCL undergrad -> LSE MSc Econ is totally feasible.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by therealOG)
    It depends what you want in your career. If you just want to go straight into investment banking (and work for the Goldman Sachs ) then I'd say LSE undergrad due the networking opportunities it has and its position as a top target uni. But if you're looking at a Masters in Economics then UCL undergrad -> LSE MSc Econ is totally feasible.
    well......i do want to try investment banking....but i think im too young to decide......wouldnt investment banks take me in if i just decided to do my masters from LSE rather that both masters and undergrad? The questions arise because I just want to be sure on where LSE would have that edge over UCL
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by zareef92)
    well......i do want to try investment banking....but i think im too young to decide......wouldnt investment banks take me in if i just decided to do my masters from LSE rather that both masters and undergrad? The questions arise because I just want to be sure on where LSE would have that edge over UCL
    You wouldn't need to do a masters in economics to go into investment banking. A bachelors leading into a graduate job is the standard procedure. If you really like Economics, and want to take it to postgrad, then it's not like a MSc Econ at LSE will be detrimental in a CV. It might just be a bit unnecessary if you want to go into IB. At the end of the day, UCL Econ will just mean that on average you have a slightly smaller chance of getting into IB than if you went to LSE. It's no biggie, especially if you're a top student. Just choose the uni where you think you'll have the best educational and social experience over 3 years.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by zareef92)
    It has been a matter of debate then again whether if one should chose UCL or LSE if one get offers from both for economics(undergraduate). Provided that offers are similar......it is fair to assume that UCL provides a more sociable environment while LSE is more tedious......if both are considered as top tier Universities, I was wondering whether if the employments prospects for people who hav completed there undergrad from either would be the same or atleast similar?
    Well, you're in a fantastic position! I am not as fortunate (i.e. I only have an offer from UCL). Most LSE/UCL BSc Economics grads I have contacted told me that both are wonderful places to study econ. The gap between the two has become all-the-more narrower in recent times. LSE is a household name all over the world. But for IB, both UCL and LSE should be fine

    This is what a current IBer (if I may call him) told me:
    "One thing to note is that when you do an internship (or go to an interview for an internship), you will generally see alot more people from LSE than UCL. For this reason most people automatically assume that LSE must be a better university and superior over UCL. However the reason is more to do with simple statistics rather than how good the university is. LSE is a specialist university and as such alot of their courses are related to finance and have finance modules within them. The majority of people who go to LSE have gone there because they know they want to go into investment banking, and as a result the number of applications for internships by students from LSE is MUCH HIGHER than that of UCL. It's only mainly people studying economics/maths in UCL that are interested in investment banking, whereas in LSE you have finance/accounting/economics/econometrics/maths/business statistics etc... and as a result there are automatically alot more applicants from the LSE, which explains why you may see more students from LSE in investment banks as opposed to UCL. So overall you're not at a disadvantage at all by picking UCL, but one thing you need to remember is that the university will only get you an interview at most".
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by nishadpotdar)
    Well, you're in a fantastic position! I am not as fortunate (i.e. I only have an offer from UCL). Most LSE/UCL BSc Economics grads I have contacted told me that both are wonderful places to study econ. The gap between the two has become all-the-more narrower in recent times. LSE is a household name all over the world. But for IB, both UCL and LSE should be fine

    This is what a current IBer (if I may call him) told me:
    "One thing to note is that when you do an internship (or go to an interview for an internship), you will generally see alot more people from LSE than UCL. For this reason most people automatically assume that LSE must be a better university and superior over UCL. However the reason is more to do with simple statistics rather than how good the university is. LSE is a specialist university and as such alot of their courses are related to finance and have finance modules within them. The majority of people who go to LSE have gone there because they know they want to go into investment banking, and as a result the number of applications for internships by students from LSE is MUCH HIGHER than that of UCL. It's only mainly people studying economics/maths in UCL that are interested in investment banking, whereas in LSE you have
    finance/accounting/economics/econometrics/maths/business statistics etc... and as a result there are automatically alot more applicants from the LSE, which explains why you may see more students from LSE in investment banks as opposed to UCL. So overall you're not at a disadvantage at all by picking UCL, but one thing you need to remember is that the university will only get you an interview at most".
    wow......that realllly helps alot ...thanks!!
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: April 7, 2011
Poll
Is the Big Bang theory correct?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.