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    I am thinking about doing a degree in economics, because obviously it is a 'good' degree that has the potential to lead me into a good career etc... and also because I enjoy Maths, although I very much doubt I could manage a degree in just maths.

    However, I don't really know whether or not I would enjoy the degree, and obviously it is important to me that i do. I have got the Economist a few times to see if I can decide how interested I am in it, and honestly, reading about all the numbers and what have you doesn't interest me hugely - so should I stop here and know it's not for me?

    I'm reading Freakonomics at the moment, and enjoying it, although I feel it's probably an extremely poor representation of what an economics degree would be like!

    So, is there any other way that I can tell how much I'd enjoy Economics before committing to a degree?

    Thanks.
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    Do the A level? Buy one of the University textbooks? Find some lectures online and watch them? Etcetc
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    Ask yourself this question: Do I want to get into (Investment) Banking and earn ****loads of money?

    If the answer is yes, Economics is not for you.

    EDIT: To whoever negged me: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ovmHfMKHuY8
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    (Original post by Arcanen)
    I am thinking about doing a degree in economics, because obviously it is a 'good' degree that has the potential to lead me into a good career etc... and also because I enjoy Maths, although I very much doubt I could manage a degree in just maths.

    However, I don't really know whether or not I would enjoy the degree, and obviously it is important to me that i do. I have got the Economist a few times to see if I can decide how interested I am in it, and honestly, reading about all the numbers and what have you doesn't interest me hugely - so should I stop here and know it's not for me?

    I'm reading Freakonomics at the moment, and enjoying it, although I feel it's probably an extremely poor representation of what an economics degree would be like!

    So, is there any other way that I can tell how much I'd enjoy Economics before committing to a degree?

    Thanks.
    That's because Freakonomics is interesting and The Economist is pretty dire . Even as an Economist I find the magazine pretty dull.

    If you don't like the maths side of economics (i.e. the numbers) then you shouldn't do it just because of the high maths content in decent economics degrees. I actually prefer the maths in economics than a proper maths degree as you're applying it to something useful.
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    (Original post by little_wizard123)
    That's because Freakonomics is interesting and The Economist is pretty dire . Even as an Economist I find the magazine pretty dull.

    If you don't like the maths side of economics (i.e. the numbers) then you shouldn't do it just because of the high maths content in decent economics degrees. I actually prefer the maths in economics than a proper maths degree as you're applying it to something useful.
    Hmm, well, that's what I like about maths though - when it's applied to something that seems worth doing, like some of the stuff in stats and what have you... I just still don't really know what I'd be doing in an economics degree...
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    The Economist is a good publication IMO but it doesn't give you much insight into what studying economics is like. It's more a general current affairs magazine with political comment, and some sections on economics and business. I always recommend people to read it because it makes you informed about whats going on in the world and able to make interesting conversation, but it won't teach you economics, it's a good supplement to understanding economics in context.

    Freakonomics....I'm not its biggest fan, I know lots of people like it but I don't think it's that useful. I reckon A level students looking for a 'pop' book on economics are better reading "The Accidental Theorist". It is aimed at people without much economics prior knowledge and written in a simple enough way to be an introduction to the subject, but it looks at proper issues in economics, eg employment, growth, national debt, rather than Freakonomics which is trying to bring up economics in unusual places.

    On amazon at the moment there's 28 'used' copies going from £6.25 for this book: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Principles-E.../dp/0324203098

    Principles of Economics by Greg Mankiw. This is IMO the best entry level textbook for someone wanting a readable guide to 1st and a bit of 2nd year undergraduate economics, so if you want to see what you'll be studying that's a good one to pick up. It's also a good one for anyone who is going into an undergrad course and wants to do some summer prep.
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    U do a lot of maths (unfortunately for me), consumers preferences, market strategies, ****load of models, game theories, pricing, explanation for inflation and unemployment of course ... etc, it's interesting to some extent.

    HOWEVER

    University largely rely on self-study, which did not (in my exp) contribute to me getting the subject entirely and memorising the concepts. The tutors are almost always horrible and the grading is absurd. Im in my second year, cramming for the exam in May, having panic attacks and wondering wtf am I going to do with that subject further in life...

    I wanted to do joint with Business and Management (another absurd subject) but we'll see...

    FFS, If you are good at maths, pick engineering! You will regret doing econ.


    My suggestion is - check textbooks for 2nd and 3rd years
    Because first year in everything is ok. Afterwards it gets being "wtf, omfg, bla"

    I can give u one of mine - Microeconomics, Robert Pindyck and Daniel Rubinfeld (7th international edition)
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    (Original post by Victor-PP)
    Ask yourself this question: Do I want to get into (Investment) Banking and earn ****loads of money?

    If the answer is yes, Economics is not for you.

    EDIT: To whoever negged me: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ovmHfMKHuY8
    I wonder what your basing that statement on... I know investment banking is very competitive and I personally don't think I'm that interested in it as a career. But why do you think that a good degree in economics isn't a good foundation to go into banking? It seems like the most relevant degree you could do for such a career.
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    (Original post by tateco)
    I wonder what your basing that statement on... I know investment banking is very competitive and I personally don't think I'm that interested in it as a career. But why do you think that a good degree in economics isn't a good foundation to go into banking? It seems like the most relevant degree you could do for such a career.
    Agreed, but that's not what I mean. What I mean is that a lot of people want to read Economics at uni purely because they want to get into IB, despite they are not passionate about the subject as such and don't really know what IB is about - just that you can earn loads of money. So therein lies the problem - Economics is the most relevant degree for IB. And as someone who loves the study of Economics, I feel strongly about the matter.
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    (Original post by Victor-PP)
    Agreed, but that's not what I mean. What I mean is that a lot of people want to read Economics at uni purely because they want to get into IB, despite they are not passionate about the subject as such and don't really know what IB is about - just that you can earn loads of money. So therein lies the problem - Economics is the most relevant degree for IB. And as someone who loves the study of Economics, I feel strongly about the matter.
    I completely agree with you and personally want to study economics to a high level, not just get a 2:1 Bsc and go and work for a bank. I suppose it is annoying when people do a degree just for the money but at the end of the day most people only want jobs for the money and if a degree is going to help them get there then they will do it
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    Couldn't agree more with those recent comments. Many people are jus delusional with the fact that Economics = Investment Banking.

    I'm sure that there are lots more interesting career path the Economics opens up but majority just want to smash their way into IBs and internships therefore the have less interest in the actual course itself. They are only interested in what it could provide them in the future.

    I, for example, will be starting the Economics course this September and the main reason I have chose to study this degree is to further enhance my knowledge about Economics principles and policies and know how they work in real life situation. Economics at A'level for me wasn't the easiest of subject but I just had a strange love for the subject hence why I would love to carry on.

    I am also thinking of doing a masters and a PhD in Economics after my undergraduate year. At the end of the day, just simply being an Economist is more realistic and far more interesting to me than just Investment Banking. Although, if I do get the chance to land a job at one of the top 4 companies like Deloitte, Goldman Sachs, PWC, I wouldn't mind.
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    (Original post by *Hakz*)
    if I do get the chance to land a job at one of the top 4 companies like Deloitte, Goldman Sachs, PWC, I wouldn't mind.
    I don't think it works like that anymore. You have to go looking for them (and get the internships and relevant ECs etc).

    I'm of the same opinion as you though. I hope to study Economics because I like the subject; I have no interest at all in investment banking. Having said that, I would sell my soul to Deutsche Bank if it meant that I could possibly transfer to Frankfurt/Germany in the future <3 But as I said above, they aren't just going to offer me a job so I'll have to find another way to get a good job in Germany.
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    (Original post by thegenius31416)
    I don't think it works like that anymore. You have to go looking for them (and get the internships and relevant ECs etc).

    I'm of the same opinion as you though. I hope to study Economics because I like the subject; I have no interest at all in investment banking. Having said that, I would sell my soul to Deutsche Bank if it meant that I could possibly transfer to Frankfurt/Germany in the future &lt;3 But as I said above, they aren't just going to offer me a job so I'll have to find another way to get a good job in Germany.
    Yeah you are centainly right. Graduates will need to do their research and find out everything this is need to apply to one. Deutsche Bank would be a dream place to work in. If you set your mind to it and continue working hard, I see no reason why this cannot come to reality.
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    You won't know until you're actually in the midst of an economics degree. I thoroughly enjoyed A-Level Economics, but in reality A-Level is vastly different to economics at university. In addition, I used some university textbooks for my A-Level studies, and despite this, I still didn't realise quite what university economics was about. (The textbooks I used were Economics by David Begg and Economics by Richard Lipsey.)

    Now I'm in my second year, and while I enjoy it, there are certain aspects I don't enjoy. In addition, last year I enjoyed certain topics and not others whereas this year I've found it's the reverse. I thoroughly enjoyed macroeconomics and econometrics last year and disliked microeconomics whereas this year I'm the complete opposite.

    At the end of the day, you're bound to enjoy certain areas within economics and dislike others. It's natural, and this is true for all degree disciplines. If you think you're vaguely interested in economics, then go for it.

    Also, as others have noted, the publications you're reading are a bad indication of what economics is about. During my pre-university studies what most attracted me to economics was labour markets, and additionally at the time labour markets were heavily in the news with the French and German elections and how both countries wanted to revitalise their economies and reduce unemployment. If you can find something like that and find it immensely interesting, then I'd hazard a guess economics is for you.
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    (Original post by Arcanen)
    I am thinking about doing a degree in economics, because obviously it is a 'good' degree that has the potential to lead me into a good career etc... and also because I enjoy Maths, although I very much doubt I could manage a degree in just maths.

    However, I don't really know whether or not I would enjoy the degree, and obviously it is important to me that i do. I have got the Economist a few times to see if I can decide how interested I am in it, and honestly, reading about all the numbers and what have you doesn't interest me hugely - so should I stop here and know it's not for me?

    I'm reading Freakonomics at the moment, and enjoying it, although I feel it's probably an extremely poor representation of what an economics degree would be like!

    So, is there any other way that I can tell how much I'd enjoy Economics before committing to a degree?

    Thanks.
    Economics is a MASSIVE field. Contrary to popular belief, we are not all about GDP per capita in Q3 and M3 expansion over the last business cycle.

    For one, I have specialised in microeconomic modules, looking at the economics of social policy (I did my dissertation on the US health care reforms), environmental economics and public economics (taxation). Do you have an interest in current policy issues about the NHS and how it is run? Do you want to explore if we can really keep extracting fish from the sea because it's a renewable resource/ if we will ever run out of oil/ how best to stop the planet from overheating? Are you curious about what the optimal level of income tax should be and why (you will not be able to guess the answer)?

    These are things that people don't necessarily think of when they think about economics, but they are huge issues that the subject has a massive literature on.

    What about macroeconomics? If fiscal and monetary policy ain't your thing (which is fair enough, because they are pretty dry), then how about considering developmental economics - why do some countries grow faster than others? Are they held back by developed countries, or is it internal problems that keep them from achieving? Why do countries like Sudan, with MASSIVE potential oil wealth, not prosper, as you'd expect? 50 years ago, Africa was expected to grow massively quickly, and Latin America to stagnate; to an extent, it has been the other way around.

    Economics is far more than equations and econometric regressions and whatever the economist (which, for what it is worth, is an awful magazine) tends to chuck out.
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    I assume this thread is dead now, but for anybody that is still around their opinion would be greatly appreciated!

    I am very interested in how we, as a society, have organised ourselves and distribute resources (hence economics) and I am also interested in where we are going and what is the purpose of government etc. Perhaps my ultimate interest is sustainable development. With this in mind, I am struggling to decide between two degrees. One is at Glasgow and is pure economics but with the Scottish system of diverse study, and the other is at York on the Environment, Economics & Ecology course.

    How vital is a thorough study of economics in trying to help solve some of the worlds current problems, such as reliance on decreasing energy sources, organizing society to be sustainable and to understand how to best move forward as a civilization in the future? The Glasgow course seems to delve into many economic concepts whereas the York course covers only really environmental economics and applied economics and is thus causing me concern. Should I go straight into specializing in environmental economics at York or get a broader understanding and 'suffer' studying some more boring modules at Glasgow?

    Link for info: http://www.york.ac.uk/environment/un...-2014/bsc-eee/
 
 
 
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