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    Firstly, I'd call the surgeon on the way and tell him there was no point, next I'd apply my insane medical skills into the surgery, which I will be performing by myself. As the patient is slowly dying, I will use my skill called 'The healing touch' which will slow down time, then I will finish the surgery with precision in under 4 minutes, stopping all problems with the patient and close the wounds with my laser eyes...
    Oh, this isn't trauma centre? :/
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    (Original post by No Future)
    How's Manc med school?
    The course is much better than when I did it (2002-2008), but even then, I had a great time. PBL in the UK was pioneered at Manchester, and though it's not for everyone, it's definitely for me (who cares about being spoon-fed the knowledge when you can learn how to find the information out for yourself? - an important skill for any medic, and indeed a wonderful life skill that has had greater reaching effects on me than just medicine).

    As for the school itself, it's modern, has great facilities, including being one the few remaining places that does cadaveric dissection, and is obviously one of the greatest cities in the UK, with a great population of people, patients and students. I have lived here since I was 13, half my life, and only after 13 years am I finally getting bored and seeking pastures new.

    Oh, and Manchester students statistically have more sex than any other uni.
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    (Original post by electricjon)
    The course is much better than when I did it (2002-2008), but even then, I had a great time. PBL in the UK was pioneered at Manchester, and though it's not for everyone, it's definitely for me (who cares about being spoon-fed the knowledge when you can learn how to find the information out for yourself? - an important skill for any medic, and indeed a wonderful life skill that has had greater reaching effects on me than just medicine).

    As for the school itself, it's modern, has great facilities, including being one the few remaining places that does cadaveric dissection, and is obviously one of the greatest cities in the UK, with a great population of people, patients and students. I have lived here since I was 13, half my life, and only after 13 years am I finally getting bored and seeking pastures new.

    Oh, and Manchester students statistically have more sex than any other uni.
    Cool. May go for clinicals.

    More than London? How did they get that?
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    (Original post by electricjon)
    Oh, and Manchester students statistically have more sex than any other uni.
    pointless given how ugly manchester chicks are.
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    (Original post by No Future)
    Ok. Is there a left neck of femur fracture as well?
    Indeed! Well spotted!
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    (Original post by No Future)
    Cool. May go for clinicals.

    More than London? How did they get that?
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/education/413791.stm

    Cambridge and Manchester top the table apparently.
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    (Original post by FailWhale)
    pointless given how ugly manchester chicks are.
    Takes one to know one I guess...
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    not a chick brah. but seriously 30% are having sex on the reg and 1/11 claim once a day (lol at cambridge claiming this with some of the nastiest broads around... smarts are inversely proportionate to attractiveness). how is that even impressive? get a gf and have sex as often as you want, its not that hard.
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    (Original post by FailWhale)
    pointless given how ugly manchester chicks are.
    I'm a female, but it's interesting to know nonetheless.
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    (Original post by electricjon)
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/education/413791.stm

    Cambridge and Manchester top the table apparently.
    Wish there was a more recent one!
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    The orthopaedic surgeon should deffoz get struck of for that!! .... And yeah ur last paragraph is right, despite me not being a doctor ..... You also have a long way to go ....
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    to become a Max fax that is!
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    Wow. That sounds like an utter nightmare.

    Perhaps stupid questions, but:

    If the ortho reg had arrived sooner, given the severity of bleeding etc, could he have done much? Was this guy basically ****ed, as you say?

    If this was during daytime, was there no ortho consultant around to help/deal with trauma cases?

    So the ortho reg was supposed to be on site whilst on call? Is that the rule for ortho or all specialties?

    Will the reg seriously get struck off?

    Useful advice and feedback, noted.
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    Who can say? All we can conclude is that without surgery he would have died no matter what. There's no way of knowing either way for sure. Such is medicine, we're not magicians and we can't see the future, so we just have to put every ounce of effort in and make every second count. Major trauma cases like this are rare enough as it is, and this was easily the worst I had ever seen (the other one being a decapitation - but then again, we couldn't do much about that!).

    As for the ortho's - I messed up the times. The x-ray says 0010, but I put 1130-1300 in the case. This happened in the early hours of Sunday night/Monday morning. So no consultants about. In retrospect we should have called the ortho consultant in as well, but then again, a lot went wrong, and a lot of heads will roll. It might even make the news.

    The ortho reg isn't obligated to stay on site, but if he takes 2 hours to get in (20% of a 10 hour shift), then can that even be considered "on-call" in the first place?
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    What makes the ortho reg so special enough to not be obligated to stay on site .... You should get that privilege also if thats the case .. Take ur time going into work if u know what I mean .. its only someones life
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    (Original post by electricjon)
    Who can say? All we can conclude is that without surgery he would have died no matter what. There's no way of knowing either way for sure. Such is medicine, we're not magicians and we can't see the future, so we just have to put every ounce of effort in and make every second count. Major trauma cases like this are rare enough as it is, and this was easily the worst I had ever seen (the other one being a decapitation - but then again, we couldn't do much about that!).

    As for the ortho's - I messed up the times. The x-ray says 0010, but I put 1130-1300 in the case. This happened in the early hours of Sunday night/Monday morning. So no consultants about. In retrospect we should have called the ortho consultant in as well, but then again, a lot went wrong, and a lot of heads will roll. It might even make the news.

    The ortho reg isn't obligated to stay on site, but if he takes 2 hours to get in (20% of a 10 hour shift), then can that even be considered "on-call" in the first place?
    What would be a "reasonable" period of time to arrive the scene (for this case) if you're on call?

    Sounds like the ortho reg is in deep ****. Is this sufficient grounds to be struck off - that he took 2 hours to get in?
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    This link has a good classification of pelvic fractures and their suggested management


    http://www.patient.co.uk/doctor/Pelvic-Fractures.htm
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    This link has a good classification of pelvic fractures and suggested management

    http://www.patient.co.uk/doctor/Pelvic-Fractures.htm
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    It's all a question of accountability and salvageability. We'll have to wait for the post mortem. If the cause of death is clearly exsanguination from pelvis fracture (as opposed to, say, a non-survivable brain injury), then yes, the ortho reg could be held entirely accountable for this man's death.

    To be struck off? Well... that depends on the nature of the delay. If he was busy brushing his teeth, then yes, no more fancy sports cars for him I'm afraid. If he lived 2 hours away, why the hell is he working at our hospital? If he got pulled over by the police for speeding, then... I don't know.
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    (Original post by mummyperson)
    This link has a good classification of pelvic fractures and their suggested management


    http://www.patient.co.uk/doctor/Pelvic-Fractures.htm
    Thanks for that. Angiography and selective embolisation may have been a life saver here.
 
 
 
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