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    The biggest problem that you have is that you want to get into a very competitive game, employers are going to take architecture graduates from the top architecture places, Cambridge, Bath, York ect. I think your best option is to do the art foundation, you're sort of selling yourself out by doing the course for such a competitive profession at DMU, it's like doing law at Leeds Met and expecting to become a barrister. If you do the art foundation, and at the same time resit your A2 D and try and get an A or B in philosophy this year you could end up with AAB at A2. This will give you a better chance of going to a better Uni, improving your employment prospects for such a competitive profession
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    There seems to be a lot of surprisingly strong hate for DMU in this thread.

    According to their website, they have full accreditation with the RIBA and ARB.

    According to Unistats, 85% of graduates were working or studying within six months, and 70% of students in employment had a graduate level job.

    It's not Oxbridge, but is this not reasonable enough? To put this it into perspective, Manchester also has a 70% rate of graduate level jobs.
    Those tables are a con.

    They are geared towards general degree's were people go on to study in various different professions. With architecture there is by and large only one profession to go into. Anyone getting a job in Tesco's or as a bin man is counted towards the percentage.

    York doesn't offer architecture btw.
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    (Original post by KeyserNI)
    Those tables are a con.

    They are geared towards general degree's were people go on to study in various different professions. With architecture there is by and large only one profession to go into. Anyone getting a job in Tesco's or as a bin man is counted towards the percentage.

    York doesn't offer architecture btw.
    I was under the impression the figures only count people who are in "graduate" work, so clearly the checkout and being a binman are not included.
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    Bin man was a extreme example.

    My university was reported as having a 79% employment rate in the Guardian tables but a 92% employment rate in the Independent tables, which number is it? Out of 38 graduates in my year I would say a maximum of 10 found work in architectural practises with maybe 5 of those getting paid. Some other people found office work related to construction while many more found random work and a few volunteered for charities.

    Without a question of a doubt there were not anywhere between 31-35 people from my class working within architecture last year. Why are the numbers different? The tables apply different methodologies to how they arrive at a score, that's why in one of the tables my school in the late 20's and in the other two it's in the early teen's. To come up with a score a table might need over 25 responses to generate a number, now at my school that represents a decent portion of the class but at others with over 100 or more graduates it's not so good.

    Also don't forget not to overlook the fact that people that have successfully gotten a job are more likely to reply to the survey.

    Within the recent methodology statements from the Guardian and the Independent you need to look closely to see where they get their numbers from.

    Guardian: Listed as 79% at my school CareerProspects
    The employability of graduates is assessed by looking at the proportion of graduates who find graduate-level employment, or study full time, within 6 months of graduation. Graduates who report that they are unable to work are excluded from the study population, which must have at least 25 respondents in order to generate results.


    No mention of where they got them or from when and unlike other aspects of the table the national student survey isn't listed in conjunction with the details of the other things that go to make up the table such as overall satisfaction and assessment & feedback.

    Independent: Listed as 92% at my school Taken from HESA data for 2007-08.

    How does it work? The number of graduates who take up employment or further study divided by the total number of graduates with a known destination expressed as a percentage. Only employment in an area that normally recruits graduates was included. The results were then adjusted to take account of the subject mix at the university.?

    What should you look out for? A relatively low score on this measure does not mean that many graduates were unemployed. It may be that some had low-level jobs such as shop assistants, which do not normally recruit graduates. Some universities recruit a high proportion of local students. If they are located in an area where graduate jobs are hard to come by, this can depress the outcome. A measure of the employability of graduates has been included in the HEFCE performance indicators but this is only available at institution level. The HESA data was used so that a subject-mix adjustment was made.


    Now this one seems to actually state where the numbers are from and how exactly they tell you what a graduate level job is, it also mentions that they only count students that have graduate level jobs within the appropriate area but the numbers are from 07-08 which is over two years ago. Architecture was a completely different place then and I would beleive the 92% of that class where employed within architecture but those numbers are a bit irrelevant now wouldn't you say? Just for perspective the numbers from this table the year before indicated that 100% of that class managed to find jobs in architecture. The architecture world was a much different place in 06,07,08 than it is now.

    You can't take all those numbers at face value you also can't take anything the universities say when trying to recruit students at face value. On the DMU website they say that lots of there students get jobs but are they using the same numbers at the independent to determine that or are they asking last years students? They will use whatever numbers make their institution look the best and disregard the rest. That's why my school only talks about the Independent and the Times rankings and disregards the Guardians.
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    Yeah, good post thanks! Kind of makes the employment statistic somewhat pointless. I was wondering how the the employment statistics varied so much for any given course. With regards to the whole economic situation at the moment, I guess I'm hoping that by the time I graduate from part 1 things will have started to look up, and by the time I complete the whole system and fully qualify that we will be out of the current economic situation.

    The guardian employment statistic for DMU architecture is still something like 77% mind.

    (would have given a longer reply, but its so nice outside, so im off to play football in the park)
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    (Original post by KeyserNI)
    Those tables are a con.

    They are geared towards general degree's were people go on to study in various different professions. With architecture there is by and large only one profession to go into. Anyone getting a job in Tesco's or as a bin man is counted towards the percentage.

    York doesn't offer architecture btw.
    I recommend having a closer look at Unistats, as it does actually give a breakdown of the specific sectors graduates found work in.

    It states that 15% of DMU graduates join the 'Architects, town planners, surveyors' bracket within six months.

    Again, I think we're all agreed, this isn't a stellar score, but to draw a comparison, Manchester has only 20% of graduates in this bracket within six months. On this basis, I don't think the OP would be getting a terrible deal going to De Mont.

    What's this about York by the way?

    Edit: another good frame of reference - only 10% of Cambridge graduates fell in the 'Architects, town planners, surveyors' bracket six months post graduation. This isn't to say that their course is sub-par, but surely it means it's better than a kick in the teeth to have a DMU architecture degree.
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    Wow! So many people speaking so much dribble and nonsense and the chances are they don't even know you and the situation you're in.

    You're clearly ready for Uni, you're challenging yourself to think about all aspects and different options and are clearly trying to wise about this.

    My advice is simple, and the chances are people will have a critical comment. They're grades that allow you to get into university. DMU is a great Uni, I'm not biast because I haven't gone there yet, but I've learnt that from what people have said. Architecture is becoming a more and more so vocational degree and DMU has the facilities to accommodate that, probably more so than most Universities. A degree and the quality of it is what YOU make of it. You can work damn hard and do the extra research and get that 1st, or you can **** about and come out having got a 3rd.

    But a degree is a degree and for the reason that the Education system is training (not teaching) pupils to pass A-levels with exam techniques, we're no more clever than those in the 80's we're just taught entirely differently. Therefore to have a job that earns you £20 000+, apart from the extreme cases you NEED a degree.

    Next year the fees go up, and if you can support yourself to do that financially then don't make it a worry, but if it is a concern take it seriously into account.

    Take in every single factor, make a wise decision with your head firmly on your shoulders and go and do what your heart is in.

    I don't think a foundation degree is what you need, I think you need the motivation at Uni to earn yourself a great degree, but if to get you in that mindset you need to spend a year getting experience do that.

    I really hope you work it out, and do what's right for you, and if you end up at DMU let me know, I'm going there this September. And for other's information I turned down Universities higher up the league table because it's not about the prestigiousness of the University it's about what you want from the University experience and what you make of it.
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    Hey your results spell the name of my tutor group...
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    (Original post by sarahmiriam)
    Wow! So many people speaking so much dribble and nonsense and the chances are they don't even know you and the situation you're in.

    You're clearly ready for Uni, you're challenging yourself to think about all aspects and different options and are clearly trying to wise about this.

    My advice is simple, and the chances are people will have a critical comment. They're grades that allow you to get into university. DMU is a great Uni, I'm not biast because I haven't gone there yet, but I've learnt that from what people have said. Architecture is becoming a more and more so vocational degree and DMU has the facilities to accommodate that, probably more so than most Universities. A degree and the quality of it is what YOU make of it. You can work damn hard and do the extra research and get that 1st, or you can **** about and come out having got a 3rd.

    But a degree is a degree and for the reason that the Education system is training (not teaching) pupils to pass A-levels with exam techniques, we're no more clever than those in the 80's we're just taught entirely differently. Therefore to have a job that earns you £20 000+, apart from the extreme cases you NEED a degree.

    Next year the fees go up, and if you can support yourself to do that financially then don't make it a worry, but if it is a concern take it seriously into account.

    Take in every single factor, make a wise decision with your head firmly on your shoulders and go and do what your heart is in.

    I don't think a foundation degree is what you need, I think you need the motivation at Uni to earn yourself a great degree, but if to get you in that mindset you need to spend a year getting experience do that.

    I really hope you work it out, and do what's right for you, and if you end up at DMU let me know, I'm going there this September. And for other's information I turned down Universities higher up the league table because it's not about the prestigiousness of the University it's about what you want from the University experience and what you make of it.
    Congratulations on your place, hope you have a great time at De Montfort.
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    I've never actually heard of anyone getting rejected from London Met or Southbank.. well done.
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    (Original post by Aarroonnn)
    I've never actually heard of anyone getting rejected from London Met or Southbank.. well done.
    Maybe you need to learn to read, I didn't get rejected from London Met, I didn't even apply there... and London Met is supposed to actually be quite good for architecture and is thus fairly competitive so your clearly an idiot.
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    (Original post by TheMeters)
    Maybe you need to learn to read, I didn't get rejected from London Met, I didn't even apply there... and London Met is supposed to actually be quite good for architecture and is thus fairly competitive so your clearly an idiot.
    Yes im taking reading lessons, dont worry. Maybe you should have applied to London Met then? with those amazing a-level predictions you've got im sure you'd get in with no problems.
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    (Original post by Aarroonnn)
    Yes im taking reading lessons, dont worry. Maybe you should have applied to London Met then? with those amazing a-level predictions you've got im sure you'd get in with no problems.
    What? I think you need to read the thread properly, you clearly have no idea.
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    I know 2 people from De Monfort. They are quite bad students.
    One of them had actually failed in one of the years and was about to fail again when I met him, he was resiting exams in august) -Plus, he was also pretty jealous of people from other schools-

    I have not seen their portfolio work though! (met them at a Photoshop tutorial hahaha)

    TheMeters, I would say you go to DMU and work very hard, get yourself a part 1 and go to a better school for part 2.

    And that's gonna be hard.Do your best to motivate yourself
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    do an art foundation year to bump up your portfolio. its not worth paying that much to go to a bad uni....with tution fee hikes like this you need to look at your degree from the perspective of a consumer, is it value for money?. is it worth the investment?

    the answer is probably not. do the foundation year, i wish i had, everyone i know who did it had a great time learnt lots of stuff . seemed to have a uni like vibe and made friends for life.

    if you're passionate about archtiecture and want to be a good architect you owe it to yourself to get into a good school that will offer you the teaching and support you need. becuase you've never done anything like architecture before ....you really DO need to be 'taught' it .
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    (Original post by bone-machine)
    do an art foundation year to bump up your portfolio. its not worth paying that much to go to a bad uni....with tution fee hikes like this you need to look at your degree from the perspective of a consumer, is it value for money?. is it worth the investment?

    the answer is probably not. do the foundation year, i wish i had, everyone i know who did it had a great time learnt lots of stuff . seemed to have a uni like vibe and made friends for life.

    if you're passionate about archtiecture and want to be a good architect you owe it to yourself to get into a good school that will offer you the teaching and support you need. becuase you've never done anything like architecture before ....you really DO need to be 'taught' it .
    I agree with you, but I don't know how much of a better uni doing a foundation year will get me in to, especially with it getting more competitive each year.

    I've got myself a couple of work experience places over the summer though, and purely coincidently the one guy who interviewed me did architecture at DMU (or Leicester Polytechnic as it was then).
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    (Original post by TheMeters)
    I agree with you, but I don't know how much of a better uni doing a foundation year will get me in to, especially with it getting more competitive each year.

    I've got myself a couple of work experience places over the summer though, and purely coincidently the one guy who interviewed me did architecture at DMU (or Leicester Polytechnic as it was then).

    ok it sounds like you've made your decision so good luck with it and good luck on your work placements
 
 
 
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