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    Anyone here doing the course or thinking of transferring to it? What do you think of the course? Do you intend on going into research later? If so, what kind?

    I'm a prospective applicant and Chemistry is one of my current interests and would like some feedback on the above.

    Thank you.
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    Looks like it's a new course that they've just implemented. I remembered Chemistry w/Mathematical Physics being one of the courses before; perhaps this is just a renamed version of it?

    If it's anything with physics, then expect a lot of the side-courses to be quite mathematical with a lot of computational analysis/maths tutorials combined with your chemistry tutorials. I heard it's pretty tough workload wise and the exams were difficult even for the majority who took Further Maths at A Level. They found it enjoyable however, and I think it'll stand you in good stead for the future because the content of its maths ventures into what the physics undergrads do in their 1st/2nd years, so it's pretty damn advanced.
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    (Original post by Madrigal)
    Anyone here doing the course or thinking of transferring to it? What do you think of the course? Do you intend on going into research later? If so, what kind?

    I'm a prospective applicant and Chemistry is one of my current interests and would like some feedback on the above.

    Thank you.
    For those students taking CwMP, the only difference in course is that you need to take Maths and Physics for Chemists 1 and Maths and Physics for Chemists 2 in years 1 and 2, respectively. Then, the elective courses you take in years 3 and 4, as well as your MSci Literature report (end of 3rd year), and MSci Research report (4th year) have to be chosen from a select few.

    If you fail to take any of the courses that you need to, you'll just get dropped down into the MSci.

    Of the 10 or so people who started on the CwMP course when I started, only 2 or 3 remain. Neither want to continue with research, and haven't a clue as to what they want to do for jobs, etc.

    EDIT: And to the person above me, the course has been going since 2006.
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    (Original post by Rofl)
    Looks like it's a new course that they've just implemented. I remembered Chemistry w/Mathematical Physics being one of the courses before; perhaps this is just a renamed version of it?

    If it's anything with physics, then expect a lot of the side-courses to be quite mathematical with a lot of computational analysis/maths tutorials combined with your chemistry tutorials. I heard it's pretty tough workload wise and the exams were difficult even for the majority who took Further Maths at A Level. They found it enjoyable however, and I think it'll stand you in good stead for the future because the content of its maths ventures into what the physics undergrads do in their 1st/2nd years, so it's pretty damn advanced.
    This sounds appealing. While I don't love Mathematics or Physics (nor Chemistry for that matter), all of them are subjects I enjoy, mostly because of my (near) obsession with wanting to know things work and the kicks I get at trying to problem solve.

    (Original post by Cyco)
    For those students taking CwMP, the only difference in course is that you need to take Maths and Physics for Chemists 1 and Maths and Physics for Chemists 2 in years 1 and 2, respectively. Then, the elective courses you take in years 3 and 4, as well as your MSci Literature report (end of 3rd year), and MSci Research report (4th year) have to be chosen from a select few.

    If you fail to take any of the courses that you need to, you'll just get dropped down into the MSci.

    Of the 10 or so people who started on the CwMP course when I started, only 2 or 3 remain. Neither want to continue with research, and haven't a clue as to what they want to do for jobs, etc.

    EDIT: And to the person above me, the course has been going since 2006.
    Yes, this is what I read on the course's page. But is the Maths and Physics for Chemists anything like Rofl mentioned?

    What did the lot of you, when choosing the course and first starting, expect from it? Assuming, there were any kind of expectations? Why choose that specific course? I imagine that if you were eligible for that, you must have been eligible for other programs, such as Mathematics or most of the engineering disciplines.
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    Does anyone know what careers this could lead to
    so far I've seen materials science and research scientist.
    I'm not sure what type of work place it would lead to, i.e. a plastics company, or in a hospital?
    Are there anythings I should read when applying for this course so I could integrate this into my personal statement?
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    Hey Abiramy1997,
    I'm a third year chemistry with molecular physics student at Imperial and I can assure you the options are broad- I would say possibly broader than standard chemistry. With Molecular Physics on your transcript you have proof to all employers that you have strengthened mathematical skills- a highly sought after transferable skill in these times. Therefore, from corporate finance in IBanking, Physical Sciences (nanoplasmonics, photonics, solid state physics e.t.c), materials science and engineering your employability will only rise with Molecular Physics. Furthermore, to think that CMP reduces employability in areas such as synthesis is just not true. The course at imperial is designed such that you do as much synthesis/traditional chemistry as everyone else in the first 2 years- your options are only chosen from third year and can still lead to equal contributions from each chemical subsection. Therefore, you are just as employable as a pure chemist in synthetic chemistry. Essentially, you are as employable as it gets from a purely degree perspective (disregarding extracurrics).

    In terms of reading, read anything that you may find interesting and can talk about. I've had conversations with various lecturers previously and they all get bored of reading about the stereotypical applicant reading the same old books. They are less interested in what you read but are highly interested in you taking a passion in some area.
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    (Original post by otr12)
    Hey Abiramy1997,
    I'm a third year chemistry with molecular physics student at Imperial and I can assure you the options are broad- I would say possibly broader than standard chemistry. With Molecular Physics on your transcript you have proof to all employers that you have strengthened mathematical skills- a highly sought after transferable skill in these times. Therefore, from corporate finance in IBanking, Physical Sciences (nanoplasmonics, photonics, solid state physics e.t.c), materials science and engineering your employability will only rise with Molecular Physics. Furthermore, to think that CMP reduces employability in areas such as synthesis is just not true. The course at imperial is designed such that you do as much synthesis/traditional chemistry as everyone else in the first 2 years- your options are only chosen from third year and can still lead to equal contributions from each chemical subsection. Therefore, you are just as employable as a pure chemist in synthetic chemistry. Essentially, you are as employable as it gets from a purely degree perspective (disregarding extracurrics).

    In terms of reading, read anything that you may find interesting and can talk about. I've had conversations with various lecturers previously and they all get bored of reading about the stereotypical applicant reading the same old books. They are less interested in what you read but are highly interested in you taking a passion in some area.

    Hi,
    Since you're a third year chemist at imperial- I was wondering if you know Imperial's policy on 2nd year entry for their chemistry courses i.e. is it possible to transfer from a different university to Imperial to study chemistry?
    Thanks.
 
 
 
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